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Old 07-27-2013, 11:33 AM   #1
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Ford 120 Lehman

Greetings
I am a new Trawler owner. I am performing all maintenance that I am aware of. Was just informed that I need to change oil in fuel pump every 50 hrs. Was not aware that I needed to change it at all. Am requesting input on what is the recommended maintenance for the fuel pump Thanks
Dale
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Old 07-27-2013, 12:41 PM   #2
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Every Oil Change works for me
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Old 07-27-2013, 12:54 PM   #3
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The injector pump is the weak link to the Ford Lehman. The recommendation is indeed every 50 hours. I do it every oil change..... Generally every 75-100 hours. It's actually the easiest thing for me to do on the engine. There isn't much oil in there. You will use the same 30wt oil you use in the engine. You will need a small funnel and I use a plastic dust pan that has a grooved channel for the oil to slide down and into a bowl/cup when emptying. Keeps it clean

30wt Chevron Delo oil is the best oil for your Lehman. Good luck, the Lehman is pretty easy to work on. One of our posters here created this step by step guide which has been extremely helpful to me. http://trawler-beach-house.blogspot....hange.html?m=1
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Old 07-27-2013, 01:28 PM   #4
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The Ford/Sabre does not need this service performed.
I found this out while trying to change the oil on my pump and spending a bunch of time not finding a way to do it.
Sabre improved the design by incorporating a pressure and return line to the rack.
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Old 07-27-2013, 04:30 PM   #5
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The Ford/Sabre does not need this service performed.
I found this out while trying to change the oil on my pump and spending a bunch of time not finding a way to do it.
Sabre improved the design by incorporating a pressure and return line to the rack.
SP135 as well.
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Old 07-27-2013, 10:32 PM   #6
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Welcome to TF and to Lehmans.

A PDF of the service manual is available on the Grand Banks forum or from the Boat Diesel website, or PM me and I can email one to you.

Bob Smith at American Diesel, 804-435-3107, is a great resource. He does a diesel class at Trawlerfest, supplies parts, and will talk to you on the phone about service and maintenance recommendations. His history with Lehman Fords is long.

He also has a "New Owners Information Sheet" that is free and good information.

Some people in the Pacific Northwest prefer Delo 15W-40 because the engines usually run cool with our 48 - 55 deg. water, but that opens up quite a box of strong opinions.

A quick list of things that often need to be attended to after a boat has been sitting for sale, in addition to oil change:
Fuel filters
Torque head bolts
Valve adjust
Transmission heat exchanger
Oil heat exchanger
Main heat exchanger zincs
Cooling water hoses, both fresh and salt
Engine mounts
Align engine and prop shaft
Check exhaust elbow

There are several maintenance differences between the 120 and the 135, so make sure any recommendations or specs you use are 120-specific. For example, a 120 requires head bolt re-torquing but a 135 uses one-time stretch bolts, and the valve clearances are different between the engines.

North Harbor up in Anacortes is good, but if you're comfortable with an oil change and valve adjustment you can do it all yourself.
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Old 07-28-2013, 09:05 AM   #7
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The Trawler Beachhouse has a blog chocked full of helpful information. They detail the injector pump oil change with pictures that I found helpful. The Trawler Beach House: Care And Feeding Of The Ford Lehman Diesel

I found the change out of the fuel filters to be a pain and will install a screw on system next time I need to change them out. Overall the 120 is pretty straight forward. Best of luck,
Arch
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Old 07-28-2013, 09:59 AM   #8
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The Trawler Beachhouse has a blog chocked full of helpful information. They detail the injector pump oil change with pictures that I found helpful. The Trawler Beach House: Care And Feeding Of The Ford Lehman Diesel

I found the change out of the fuel filters to be a pain and will install a screw on system next time I need to change them out. Overall the 120 is pretty straight forward. Best of luck,
Arch
I second Arch's comments. Chuck knows alot about the Lehman! Also Mark at American Diesel is very helpful in Virginia.
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Old 07-28-2013, 04:13 PM   #9
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Some people in the Pacific Northwest prefer Delo 15W-40 because the engines usually run cool with our 48 - 55 deg. water, but that opens up quite a box of strong opinions.

So, I'm buying oil at Walmart yesterday. They had 2.5 gal jugs for $32. But they only had 15W-40 (this was in Rockland, Maine). I asked afisherman, who was also buying and he said they all use 15W-40. As Walmart, did not even have any straight 30W, I figured they knew what sold and what didn't.

I've been using 30W, but am thinking that for these cooler climes, (water temp is 53F), i am better off using a multi grade.

BTW engine is SP135

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Old 07-28-2013, 08:09 PM   #10
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Some people in the Pacific Northwest prefer Delo 15W-40 because the engines usually run cool with our 48 - 55 deg. water, but that opens up quite a box of strong opinions.

So, I'm buying oil at Walmart yesterday. They had 2.5 gal jugs for $32. But they only had 15W-40 (this was in Rockland, Maine). I asked afisherman, who was also buying and he said they all use 15W-40. As Walmart, did not even have any straight 30W, I figured they knew what sold and what didn't.

I've been using 30W, but am thinking that for these cooler climes, (water temp is 53F), i am better off using a multi grade.

BTW engine is SP135

Richard
That oil will be fine, it is much better then the best oil available when the engine was manufactured. I use Shell Rotella as that is what they sell at Sam's.
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Old 07-28-2013, 08:38 PM   #11
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Ditto here on the Rotella 15w4

It you are interested in adjusting engine valve lash I posted info a while back- the 120 should be almost the same. I would be glad to answer any questions about setting the 120. Lehman SP135 Adjusting engine valves
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Old 07-28-2013, 11:30 PM   #12
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Some people in the Pacific Northwest prefer Delo 15W-40 because the engines usually run cool with our 48 - 55 deg. water, but that opens up quite a box of strong opinions.

So, I'm buying oil at Walmart yesterday. They had 2.5 gal jugs for $32. But they only had 15W-40 (this was in Rockland, Maine). I asked afisherman, who was also buying and he said they all use 15W-40. As Walmart, did not even have any straight 30W, I figured they knew what sold and what didn't.

I've been using 30W, but am thinking that for these cooler climes, (water temp is 53F), i am better off using a multi grade.

BTW engine is SP135

Richard
This thread is titled Lehman 120, which calls for 30W in the manual. If someone wants to go dirt cheap...... Buy the Rotella 30W from Walmart for the Lehman 120/80.
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Old 07-29-2013, 06:55 AM   #13
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The OLDer LEHMAN manuals call for only single weight oils...the newer manuals are updated to include multi-weights.

American Diesel still recommends single weights but have never really heard a good reason why...kinda like the general internet discussion of single versus multiweight oil.

The are many Lehman wners out there that have been using multiweight oil for years and no one has reported a failure yet...and I doubt they ever will.

An independent oil analysis rated Walmart oil as good as some of the maor brands and better than some other well known brands...the trouble is will it be that consistenly in the future? Maybe...maybe not.

Bottom line is that in most of the oil threads I have read, no one has really ever shown where ANY oil has without a doubt either lengthened or shortened the service life of their diesel.

And to say one oil is better than another is pretty hard to back up. Most oils have formulations that are different enough that oil analysis labs squirm and usually refuse to say which is better...but they may say which may help YOUR particular engine based on an oil analysis.
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Old 07-29-2013, 07:19 AM   #14
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... oil analysis labs squirm and usually refuse to say which is better...
An oil analysis lab will tell you what is in the sample you submitted and compare the findings to published industry standards and previously submitted samples.

They are not so foolish as to make a subjective call as to which oil is "better" than another. That is between you and the machinery manufacturer.

I think it is kind of amusing that we never read these religious debates about fuel oil and that stuff lives a far harder life in a much more critical application.
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Old 07-29-2013, 07:33 AM   #15
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If Sam's Club or 7-Eleven only had fuel docks.....

I'm still trying to figure out why Lehman Fuel Injection Pumps need such frequent oil changes..I've never really heard a specific reason other than "wear".

Anyone ever hear a specific?
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Old 07-29-2013, 08:19 AM   #16
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Greetings,
Mr. psneeld. It is my understanding that once an injection pump starts to "wear", raw fuel leaks past the internal seals and dilutes the oil in the body of the pump, thus decreasing the lubricity of said oil. So, yes, "wear", is the reason for the "frequent" oil changes.
IMHO, any name brand oil (in my case I use the single weight) changed on a, as suggested, regular basis will provide adequate protection and lubrication for our Lehman 120's. Bottom line is "Change your oil."
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Old 07-29-2013, 09:05 AM   #17
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Greetings,
Mr. psneeld. It is my understanding that once an injection pump starts to "wear", raw fuel leaks past the internal seals and dilutes the oil in the body of the pump, thus decreasing the lubricity of said oil. So, yes, "wear", is the reason for the "frequent" oil changes.
IMHO, any name brand oil (in my case I use the single weight) changed on a, as suggested, regular basis will provide adequate protection and lubrication for our Lehman 120's. Bottom line is "Change your oil."
OK...I buy the wear explanation...but 50 hrs? wouldn't it make more sense to put a magnet pickup on one of the plugs, etc..etc rather than a 50 hr change?

Can't imagine the wear is an issue until several thousand hrs of operation so to say 50 hrs on higher time engines makes sense so you catch oil dilution early...but even then...a small dip and smell should reveal dilution...no need for a full change.

Of course all that said...it's not that big of a deal...just once a week cruising seems excessive. I'm guessing that if I went to 75 hours cruising hard I'm never really going to see an issue.
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Old 07-29-2013, 10:42 AM   #18
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OK...I buy the wear explanation...but 50 hrs? wouldn't it make more sense to put a magnet pickup on one of the plugs, etc..etc rather than a 50 hr change?
Spot on in my opinion.

Those same pumps go for ages on tractors with no oil changes at all, just the odd top up when someone notices the level is low, which might be years later. From what I have read, most owners who even bother (since many of them own the things for a hobby as the tractors they are on are vintage units) change the pump oil when they change the crankcase oil.

The injection pump plungers are lubricated by fuel, the cam and governor parts are splash lubricated by oil. Diluted oil splashes quite well. Has anyone had an injection pump fail because the cam or governor wore out?

And for what it's worth generally, a magnetic plug will only tell you what has already suffered substantial and rapid wear, it won't prevent much besides chunks of iron rattling around.
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Old 07-29-2013, 10:55 AM   #19
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fuel dilution is the problem in lubricating the fuel pump . I believe you could smell the oil drained from your pump see if you are experiencing this problem changing the oil in the pump is a simple job and takes less than a quart of oil I don't see the issue
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Old 07-29-2013, 12:36 PM   #20
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fuel dilution is the problem in lubricating the fuel pump . I believe you could smell the oil drained from your pump see if you are experiencing this problem changing the oil in the pump is a simple job and takes less than a quart of oil I don't see the issue
Just curious....I like to know why I do things that may be simple but still take time, energy and money....those 3 issues might be important if I'm still cruising at 85...

So many things have dragged on as old wives tales...you know how many people still don't think they should put their batteries on concrete?

Just wanted to know if the 50 hour change came from the same mindset that I might only get 19,000 hours instead of 20,000 hours out of a Lehman if I use multiweight oil or use Walmart oil instead of something 2x as expensive.
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