Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 03-24-2013, 01:37 PM   #1
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Flushing the cooling system

I have a couple of cooling questions.

I have a plan to flush out the heat exchanger with Peak radiator flush. Reading the directions, it's a pretty involved process of drain, fill with water, run to temp, drain, fill with water again (I assume to get the coolant out of the block that is behind the thermostat). Then fill with water and flush and run for a few hours with just the flush/water combo. Any pointers you all can give here? It seem pretty straight-forward. Is there any danger to running with just water or in leaving the flush/water mixture in the cooling system for a week between our trips?

Thanks.
Tom-
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 07:25 AM   #2
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
A good flush system will have a cleaner , then a nutrelizer as part of the kit.

Yes flushing multiple times is a chore but required,enjoy!
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 07:33 AM   #3
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Hmmm... A multi-part system? I must know more! If there was a "tool" I could use... A portal or maybe some kind of engine that would allow me to conduct a search of the web. Lemme think. LoL!

Should the thermostats be removed for this process?
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 08:01 AM   #4
Guru
 
swampu's Avatar


 
City: Biloxi, MS
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cajun Rose
Vessel Model: Biloxi Lugger
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,144
What does the stuff do? Do you have the keel coolers? I just used a wet vac and blew the water out.
swampu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2013, 08:12 AM   #5
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Clean any possible scale deposits out of the heat exchanger and water jackets in the engine.
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2013, 02:16 PM   #6
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
So i nust finished flushing the cooling system. Basically, I chickened out of using the flushing fluid. What I did was just flush with clean water five times. I drained the heat exchanger, filled with clean water, run engine to temp, then repeat four more times. Then today I just blasted the hose thru it until the water ran clear. Took about 25 gallons.

My cooling system holds 5 gallons total and the heat exchanger holds about 2.5 gallons. When I was done flushing out as much of the old coolant, i just filled the tank with 100% Fleet Charge coolant and run engine up to temp one more time to mix coolant charge to 50-50 mix

That should do for a year or two.
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2013, 05:34 PM   #7
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,792
So did you get a good look at, or better yet pull the heat exchanger itself and see what condition it is in?
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 09:10 AM   #8
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Nope.

Certainly, had I attempted such a feat, I would have shared it here
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 10:50 AM   #9
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,792
When was the last time the H/E was checked and cleaned? They really need attention in our waters. I have mine done every couple of years. Also when was the last time the cooling system was actually cleaned vs flushed? If it has been awhile you will probably be amazed at what comes out when you do. By the way, here is IMO the best stuff for these exercises:

Marine | PenrayPenray
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 09:44 PM   #10
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
Not in the four years I have had it. I feel like if it was showing signs of overheating, I would go that route, but I am well within spec temps (190 degrees). I will talk to my trusted marine engine tech and see what they recommend. Thanks.
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2013, 11:08 PM   #11
Guru
 
Capthead's Avatar
 
City: Long Beach, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Heads Up
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 950
I always check my coolant with an ohm meter. This will show the current that the coolant is drawing and the electrolysis it's creating inside your engine eating away at the internal metal. It's best to change out coolant every 2 or 3 years regardless of hours on the engine. Antifreeze becomes acidic over time and acid with dissimilar metals makes electricity.

When I replace my coolant I always flush my engine a few times and I replace it with a 50/50 mix using distilled water so I don't make solids in the engine with mineral deposits.

When I clean out the salt side of the heat exchangers I use a mild acid and let it work about 30 minutes then start the engine. When I go aft and look at the water I can see small pieces of mineral or salt chunks coming out. I can inspect the exchangers by opening the end cap.

To test the coolant. Take your VOM meter and set it on the lowest DC setting. Place the positive in the coolant not the over flow tank and the neg against the block. It should read under .10 volts and .3 is acceptable but anything over that is bad.
Capthead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 11:14 AM   #12
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capthead View Post
I always check my coolant with an ohm meter. This will show the current that the coolant is drawing and the electrolysis it's creating inside your engine eating away at the internal metal. It's best to change out coolant every 2 or 3 years regardless of hours on the engine. Antifreeze becomes acidic over time and acid with dissimilar metals makes electricity.

When I replace my coolant I always flush my engine a few times and I replace it with a 50/50 mix using distilled water so I don't make solids in the engine with mineral deposits.

When I clean out the salt side of the heat exchangers I use a mild acid and let it work about 30 minutes then start the engine. When I go aft and look at the water I can see small pieces of mineral or salt chunks coming out. I can inspect the exchangers by opening the end cap.

To test the coolant. Take your VOM meter and set it on the lowest DC setting. Place the positive in the coolant not the over flow tank and the neg against the block. It should read under .10 volts and .3 is acceptable but anything over that is bad.
Thanks for the tip. That's a new one to me, will have to try it. I use the little "litmus test" strips from Penray or Detroit Diesel.

I just as soon not wait for the engine to start running hot as a way of determining if the HE is getting clogged. Kind of like waiting for your engine to start stalling out as a way of deciding when to change the fuel filters.
I am not sure there is a similar way to determine if your turbo intercoolers (or aftercoolers as the case may be) are getting clogged either, but I'm not going to wait around and find out....
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2013, 12:19 PM   #13
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 2,739
I pull all heat exchangers apart every 3 years or so and clean them out with muratic acid, bore brushes, then flush clean, reseal and paint.
Last time I did that (a year ago) I found one the main mounting plate had broken at the braze joint. I don't know if I would have spotted that if I didn't completely remove it.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Attitude Adjustment
40 Albin
Mystic,Ct. /New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 06:46 AM   #14
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
A quick underway check is to use a heat measuring gun on the output side of the cooler where the sea water leaves.

Under 140F is required ,lower is better! otherwise salt is slowly plugging the heat exchanger.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 07:23 AM   #15
Guru
 
Capthead's Avatar
 
City: Long Beach, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Heads Up
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 42 Classic
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 950
I have a not so funny story about Muriatic acid. Several boats down from me is a Striker with twin Cat's in it. Their friend was telling them to flush with it to get all the salt build up out of their cooling system. They went out and bought nine gallons of it and flushed and flushed and flushed. When they tried to start one engine the acid had eaten all the way through and water was inside two cylinders. They hydrolocked it. They had to tear the engine down and do a rebuild.


A little goes a long way with that acid. I use a mild phosphoric acid like lime away and it works fine and will wash away with water.
Capthead is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-02-2013, 12:37 PM   #16
Veteran Member
 
tiku's Avatar
 
City: Espoo
Country: Finland
Vessel Name: Carpe Diem
Vessel Model: Storebro 34
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 74
Would citric acid do the trick? It's safe (classified as foodstuff) and can be discharged as normal waste.


I have used it in getting rid of rust from pot iron parts and especially when it is heated it works wonders in rust removal purposes.
__________________
Storebro 34 Royal Cruiser - 1969
Twin Volvo Penta Tamd 40b with shafts
www.storebro34rc.blogspot.fi
tiku is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 05:14 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Bendit's Avatar
 
City: Auckland
Country: New Zealand
Vessel Name: Pioneer
Vessel Model: Westcoaster 53 converted to pleasure
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 283
Don't know about citric acid, but I do use it to descale the coffee maker!

For the HE, I use white vinegar. Empty the HE, fill with vinegar, leave for a few days then empty and turn the raw water intake back on.

I do this every 2 years and notice a few degrees drop in operating temp each time.
Bendit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 05:38 PM   #18
Guru
 
Tom.B's Avatar
 
City: Cary, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Skinny Dippin'
Vessel Model: Navigator 4200 Classic
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 5,153
And then your exhaust smells like pickles. Talk about a win-win!!
__________________
2000 Navigator 4200 Classic
(NOT a trawler)
Tom.B is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 07:14 PM   #19
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 15,883
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom.B View Post
And then your exhaust smells like pickles. Talk about a win-win!!
Use veggie oil biodiesel and you can add the french fry smell....
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-04-2013, 06:50 AM   #20
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
Most heat exchanger can be taken apart , rodded out (use a proper sized dowel) and reassembled for only the cost of a gasket or O ring set.

No acid required.
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:02 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012