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Old 08-26-2014, 07:54 AM   #21
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[QUOTE=LarryM;260922]Yea, breathtaking isn't it?

Each of my boats have excellent exhaust elbows.....however someday....
Please post a general price range for this hi dollar stuff, you have my curiosity up. Thanks...
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Old 08-26-2014, 08:17 AM   #22
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Bevel cut and glass fiberglass tube to get what you need to fit. Join to mixer and to muffler with six inch sleeves of softwall rubber exhaust hose. Lowest dollar option and still good engineering.
Totally agreed. Epoxy the cut pieces together to hold them in place, clean up the inside, then several wraps of resin-soaked fiberglass tape around the joint.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:24 AM   #23
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[QUOTE=Mule;260983]
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Yea, breathtaking isn't it?

Each of my boats have excellent exhaust elbows.....however someday....
Please post a general price range for this hi dollar stuff, you have my curiosity up. Thanks...
The elbows are surprisingly reasonable, but the corrugated silicone hose is crazy expensive. The straight silicone hose is a little less expensive if you don't need the extra flexibility.
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:32 AM   #24
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it's still relatively easy to burn through the blue silicon hose.... the 454 on the assistance towboat tried it for 2 seasons and it burned through when the sea water plugged and some throttle was used.

It's good ....but far from VERY high heat resistance...then again I have burned through the fiberglass tubes also...
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Old 08-26-2014, 10:00 AM   #25
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it's still relatively easy to burn through the blue silicon hose.... the 454 on the assistance towboat tried it for 2 seasons and it burned through when the sea water plugged and some throttle was used.

It's good ....but far from VERY high heat resistance...then again I have burned through the fiberglass tubes also...
Yea, I know the feeling. We once burned through some blue VHT hump hoses on a Donzi, it happened in about 15 seconds when we picked up a plastic bag. We switched to red VHT which is rated at 500F, but it doesn't stand up long to raw, un-cooled exhaust gas! I've seen burnt fiberglass tubes too, on an old Cape Dory sailboat with a little 2-cyl Volvo diesel. It melted the muffler too! It doesn't matter how big or small the engine is, without cooling water, things change mighty fast. Scary stuff . . . even when you try to do everything right..
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Old 08-26-2014, 10:26 AM   #26
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Yea, I know the feeling. We once burned through some blue VHT hump hoses on a Donzi, it happened in about 15 seconds when we picked up a plastic bag. We switched to red VHT which is rated at 500F, but it doesn't stand up long to raw, un-cooled exhaust gas! I've seen burnt fiberglass tubes too, on an old Cape Dory sailboat with a little 2-cyl Volvo diesel. It melted the muffler too! It doesn't matter how big or small the engine is, without cooling water, things change mighty fast. Scary stuff . . . even when you try to do everything right..
Good examples of the best not really being good enough and the cheap working fine till things go wrong.

Always a crapshoot where to spend your money...
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Old 08-26-2014, 10:47 AM   #27
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Attached (crappy - sorry) pics show where I'd cut the existing pipe (yellow lines) - then use the flexible pipe (clamped onto the two ends). So yes - it would be in the wet part of the system.
.
I'd get rid of all the stainless steel (not try and use the elbows) and just use hose, and if needed fiberglass elbow/s then you can forget the whole thing without thinking that the elbows are going next.
A cooling water flow alarm is a must for me...
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Old 08-26-2014, 10:54 AM   #28
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I'd get rid of all the stainless steel (not try and use the elbows) and just use hose, and if needed fiberglass elbow/s then you can forget the whole thing without thinking that the elbows are going next.
A cooling water flow alarm is a must for me...
In all cases where I have burned hoses, the engine coolant never got warm...doesn't take much water flow on a 454.

The obvious best sensor in my cases would be an exhaust temp sensor.

I have a water flow sensor on the Trawler's Lehman but I still get nervous about downstream issues like when my oil cooler fell apart on the towboat...flow sensor would have been normal as I'm filling my bilge, but the exhaust would be skyrocketing.
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Old 08-26-2014, 11:11 AM   #29
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In all cases where I have burned hoses, the engine coolant never got warm...doesn't take much water flow on a 454.

The obvious best sensor in my cases would be an exhaust temp sensor.

I have a water flow sensor on the Trawler's Lehman but I still get nervous about downstream issues like when my oil cooler fell apart on the towboat...flow sensor would have been normal as I'm filling my bilge, but the exhaust would be skyrocketing.
You are right, you can fry your exhaust b/4 your coolant temp gauge even moves but I am talking about raw water flow sensors.

You can install most flow sensors (check temp range allowed) anywhere in the seawater system and mine is installed in the water discharge thus will warn of almost any break or malfunction in the system
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Old 08-26-2014, 11:17 AM   #30
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You are right, you can fry your exhaust b/4 your coolant temp gauge even moves but I am talking about raw water flow sensors.

You can install most flow sensors (check temp range allowed) anywhere in the seawater system and mine is installed in the water discharge thus will warn of almost any break or malfunction in the system
Sorry...you are correct...just before the injection would be best but not always possible.

I'm thinking of moving mine...just got to alter a few things..
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Old 08-26-2014, 12:04 PM   #31
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Sorry...you are correct...just before the injection would be best but not always possible.

I'm thinking of moving mine...just got to alter a few things..
I haven't attached mine yet, but Borel's instructions are:

SENSOR INSTALLATION.
Sensor band will fit exhaust hose in the range of 2 to 7 diameter. For larger diameter exhaust hose, use extension kit for up to 14 diameter. Locate band down stream of water injection just after existing stainless steel hose clamps.


Some have mentioned that there can be a hot spot at the top of the hose, just down stream from the mixer elbow at low engine speeds. Apparently there is not enough 'mixification' (new nautical term) and the water is just running down the hose in a stream, which keeps the bottom cool, but allows the top to become hotter. Because of this, false alarms can occur. In this case, they recommend placing the sensor(s) along the bottom of the hose.
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Old 08-26-2014, 04:06 PM   #32
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I'm thinking of moving mine...just got to alter a few things..
Mine is an old Aqualarm made of CPVC good for 250F they said, so I moved mine.
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Old 08-26-2014, 04:28 PM   #33
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I'm familiar with the Trident 252V hose that has been recommended. It really is great hose. If my memory is correct it can be had in 3, 6, 12 and 60 foot lengths.
I also know a Trident distributor with great prices who ships to Oz, but the forum rules prevent me from saying who it is.

But I can I believe.

Try contacting these fine folks: Hopkins-Carter Marine Supply and Fishing Tackle
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:16 PM   #34
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Thanks Bill! He did!
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Old 08-26-2014, 09:05 PM   #35
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As I've already pulled the system apart (thus cannot run my engine to find out) - can anyone gove me a ballpark figure of what temps I'd be looking at that close to the water injection? The discovery of the trident Extreme temp hose (thanks Parks!) has me wondering if I shouldn't go up to that rating (rather than the 'standard' high temp hose rated to 180 deg C).

So.. if anyone can help with those temps I'd be mighty thankful.

Cheers!
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Old 08-26-2014, 11:49 PM   #36
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As I've already pulled the system apart (thus cannot run my engine to find out) - can anyone gove me a ballpark figure of what temps I'd be looking at that close to the water injection? The discovery of the trident Extreme temp hose (thanks Parks!) has me wondering if I shouldn't go up to that rating (rather than the 'standard' high temp hose rated to 180 deg C).

So.. if anyone can help with those temps I'd be mighty thankful.

Cheers!
For decades in both gas and diesel, I have always heard that you should be able to rest your hand on the riser or hose when running at cruise or <140F. The exhaust hose on my Yanmar 4JH3E runs about 110F in the summer and a little cooler in winter. On my old Donzi, with a Mercruiser 525SC the risers and hoses were only warm to the touch. We always checked the risers by hand and never had any unpleasant surprises. Lucky I guess.

Borel and Aqualarm use temperature sensors that activate in the 175-200F range for their cooling water alarm system.

Maybe some other TF members have experience they can share.

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Old 08-27-2014, 02:30 AM   #37
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Thanks Larry. Wow - that's kind of surprising to me - I never would have thought the exhaust could be cooled that quickly. This is my first wet exhaust system - I'd never even consider touching a dry system pipe. I suppose there's a fair bit of water being pumped into it - but even so... quite amazing.

Thanks all for the input - it's been very interesting.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:17 AM   #38
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I'd never even consider touching a dry system pipe. I suppose there's a fair bit of water being pumped into it - but even so... quite amazing.
Yes, a dry stack is a very different beast. Why don't you post the exact engine(s) you have in your boat so others might chime in with their observations.

BTW, I believe that standard black marine exhaust hose is rated at 250F, which is well above the overheating thresholds established by the alarm manufacturers. Many thousands of boats are equipped with standard hose, and run for a very long time with the original hose(s) installed by the builder or rigger.

I would use blue or red silicone hose if you have an application that requires it, or if you simply want the extra capability and durability, or even just for the cool factor, but most applications will be just fine with standard hose. I only used it in my application because I needed the flexibility of the corrugated silicone hose, and I found a remnant that was half price.

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Old 08-27-2014, 08:35 AM   #39
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They are Volvo TAMD41A's, Larry.

I got a good deal on some purosil hose from a guy close by today - so I'll be sporting nice new cool factor blue pipe
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:51 AM   #40
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Looks like standard black hose on your original install, if that did not burn out it should be fine. Normal wet exhaust runs maybe 40F above sea temp, but there can be hot spots.

That's a tight 90deg bend right at outlet, that may be tricky to make that bend.
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