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Old 07-29-2017, 07:25 PM   #1
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Exhaust Wrap/Tape for Dry Riser sections

I want to renew the (unknown type) exhaust wrap/tape on my dry riser sections. (I don't want the blanket-type wraps). I see all sorts of fiberglass and other tapes advertised, mainly by automotive places. Some of these (typically claiming to be 'titanium' blends) are rated up to 1200F. My current tape is around 3-4" wide and I have about 4' of dry riser off each engine to do.

Looking for recommendations on what works, was easy to use and of course, looks good!

thanks in advance
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:39 PM   #2
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I bought this stuff after much research for my dry risers on my 2 x 2715E lehmans Easy to work and fit. Used lava tape round the bends and put this on top, looks pretty reasonable. Been on a project to lower my engine room from the 130-140f to now 110F. Engines run better now ingesting ambient 85F air blown at the intakes, produceiing more HP at lower rpm, seem to have improved GPH as well. Burning more denser cooler air/ less fuel / bigger bang!

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
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Old 07-29-2017, 08:52 PM   #3
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Call Roses Marine in Gloucester , Ma. They can hook you up with fiberglass tape and "Chill Seal" to seal it. It is the newer version of the old Arabol (lagging compund). Makes for a slick installation on dry stack sections. Roses deals with dry stack issues everyday.


Oops, didn't see that you were in Australia.
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Old 07-29-2017, 09:28 PM   #4
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Martin J: thanks...and that may be available here in Oz, but I can certainly get it via Amazon. Could you explain why you used the lava tape (I've seen that advertised here) round bends and then the Heatshield Armor over?


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Old 07-29-2017, 09:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailor of Fortune View Post
Call Roses Marine in Gloucester , Ma. They can hook you up with fiberglass tape and "Chill Seal" to seal it. It is the newer version of the old Arabol (lagging compund). Makes for a slick installation on dry stack sections. Roses deals with dry stack issues everyday.


Oops, didn't see that you were in Australia.

Funny. Rose's is in my home town. Great place, but impractical in this case.
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Old 07-29-2017, 09:36 PM   #6
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Guys: don't assume that a US supplier is inaccessible to TF members in Oz! Even if they don't offer intn'l shipping, many of us have US post boxes and forwarding companies. I buy most of my boat bits from the US this way, often consolidating multiple packages to reduce shipping costs (which via USPS Int'l Priority are pretty good anyway).
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Old 07-29-2017, 09:39 PM   #7
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Funny. Rose's is in my home town. Great place, but impractical in this case.
Grew up with them and worked out of Roses Wharf for several years. They are hands on kind of guys. Marty , David and Kenny have YEARS of real experience on anything marine. Most of the New England boat builders rely on their machine shop for shafting and related running gear expertise.

I agree impractical in this instance. Didn't see it was an Aussie until after I posted.
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:30 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Sailor of Fortune View Post
Grew up with them and worked out of Roses Wharf for several years. They are hands on kind of guys. Marty , David and Kenny have YEARS of real experience on anything marine. Most of the New England boat builders rely on their machine shop for shafting and related running gear expertise.

I agree impractical in this instance. Didn't see it was an Aussie until after I posted.
Small world, in more ways than one.

It's such an unassuming place and appears to be a hole in the wall...until you walk out back or down stairs where the machine shop and fabrication is.
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Old 07-29-2017, 11:59 PM   #9
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Lageed with the lava which cut down the heat well, But gained lots more insulation with the sheet stuff which really killed the heat and taped the joints with aluminum tape. It mad a nice finish. When I got the boat in 2012 the P.O. had stripped a lot of the boat , before he died very little was operational. After his death the family came and tookeverything of value. The boat was really bare bones. I looked on it as a clean slate, and after using it for a few months realized the engine room (full size 61/2ft headroom 10ft fore and aft and full 15 1/2ft beam was running to hot in the Caribbean. Hitting temps of 140F. So set about changing that, the insulation on the risers was old style and been removed numerous times, and using a heat sensing gun showed huge heat leakage. Whereas the engine block etc was running at op temps 180F, the risers were 3 times that, so before I dealt with airflow I changed the riser insulation to be more efficient, that coupled with a proper vent system, E.R. room air changed every 90 secs, plus forced ambient air blown at the engine intake fiters solved the E.R. Temps into the 110F approx, Engines run better and quieter, and produce better combustion and power at lower rpm.
Cool engine rooms are efficient engine rooms. !!
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Old 07-30-2017, 07:02 AM   #10
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A bit of clarification from a friend that is an expert in the marine engine business.....

"His engine room is quieter because his thermal insulation is also a good acoustic insulator. His engine room is cooler because he reduced heat radiated from the exhaust piping.

As far as efficiency goes, reducing intake air temperature actually reduces engine efficiency. It the increases fuel required to achieve a given power level, brake specific fuel consumption increases.

The only condition where high intake temperatures impact power is that the maximum power output is reduced at (what recreational boaters would see as) extremely high intake temperatures.

A cool engine room is better because it prolongs the life of rubber and plastics and electrical components. It reduces heat transfer to the rest of the boat and that reduces the load on air conditioning components.

It does not improve diesel engine efficiency or part load performance."

So we see yet another compromise in boating.....hardly anything isnt a tradeoff, but I think the incremental efficiency gained isnt worth the plusses of heat and noise reduction....

If they were substsntial in my boat, then I woukd have to think how to work within that compromise.
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Old 07-30-2017, 07:38 AM   #11
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On some installations using sections of dbbl or tripple insulated fire place SS works well.

You loose the ability to have a drying hanging locker , but it does help keep the vessel ER at low temperature.
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Old 07-30-2017, 09:15 AM   #12
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Just curious.... why the objection to insulation blankets widely used on dry exhaust sections? Ours have been fine, and the exterior can be touched with your hand.
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Old 07-30-2017, 09:44 AM   #13
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I will not get into a long discussion as to what your mechanic thinks. He's wrong. I have attached some articles that I hope you'll read concerning adequate ventalation and the effect on cold air and performance. In particular the Passagemaker article towards the end . I have also included a link to Caterpilars engine rooom ventaltion guide. Which shows engine room flow etc as well as huge realm of other information. There are many calculators on line showing effects on ambient to E.R. temps. Unfortunately I can not find the one I used some 3+ years ago when I started my ER improvments. It resulted ina 8% increase in efficency for my engines. Plus as you stated the improvents to belts ,plastics, etal plus of course the batteries performance.
https://www.dieselnet.com/tech/diesel_air.php
Venting the Engineroom - Professional BoatBuilder Magazine
https://www.passagemaker.com/technic...nt-ventilation
http://s7d2.scene7.com/is/content/Ca...13-53120-44971
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Old 07-30-2017, 10:15 AM   #14
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The very first thing I googled had this to say...

"A colder air charge going into the engine will be denser and contain more oxygen than it's warmer counterpart. You are still using more fuel to create more power, thus there is no added efficiency benefit."

My guess based on all the other articles and explanations is that you can make more power with denser air, it really doesnt improve efficiency...

Tech articles explain it better, magazine articles written for the average boater gloss over a few important details .

Way past most needs here, as I said, I prefer the cooler engine room for other reasons.
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Old 07-30-2017, 11:54 AM   #15
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Sorry I mispoke in post 10....

Its not an incremental increase in efficiency.
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Old 07-31-2017, 05:44 AM   #16
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"A colder air charge going into the engine will be denser and contain more oxygen than it's warmer counterpart. You are still using more fuel to create more power, thus there is no added efficiency benefit."

Agree, When the fuel ignites it raises the temperature of the combustion gasses .

These expanded gasses are what creates the oower.

It takes more fuel to heat cold combustion air than hotter combustion air.

On large 18 wheel trucks for about 5-10 years they have been using Evans coolant and running much higher engine temps , for efficiency.

Evans waterless coolant, prevent engine overheating


https://www.evanscoolant.com/


Evans waterless coolant, the solution to engine overheating & corrosion for classic cars, hot rods, muscle cars, power sports, off road, heavy duty.
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Old 08-02-2017, 05:02 PM   #17
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Dragging this thread back to the original query (though the other comments have been very interesting), I've decided to go with Martin J's recommendation at post #2, viz: "Heatshield Armor" sheeting. I'll go with the 1/2" thick stuff...it is recommended for turbo diesels over the 1/4" sheet. I've looked into it and found favourable reviews on line. Seems like a reasonable compromise between doing better than fibreglass tape and costly custom blanket work. Will post photos of finished job....as long as it ends up as good-looking as the online photos suggest!
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Old 08-02-2017, 06:54 PM   #18
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This is what I used, easy to install, has lasted three years so far with no problems. I gave the excess to a friend and he did his Cummins in a Symbol. Works great. A box comes with the very sticky tape required.
ExoWrap® Insulation System
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Old 09-09-2017, 05:53 PM   #19
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Well thanks to Martin J (post #2): I followed his lead on HeatShield and my own research confirmed that this seemed like a good option, so I ordered a roll from the US. I got the 1/2" thick stuff recommended for diesels and an 18" x 10' roll. In fact the as-delivered width was closer to 20". I found it easy to work with and have completed my Stb riser and almost done Port, bar a 'complex curve' that I need to template up to get right.
I was slow getting back to the guy who built my new Stb exhaust riser so he just went ahead and got it ceramic-coated. I preventatively replaced the Cummins wet elbow on this side so I sent this to the same ceramic coating place. I'm pleased that I did, because the wet elbow doesn't get wrapped and it now 'matches' the Heatshield insulation blanket...a pretty professional look overall I think. Photos below show 1) the original set-up---old tape and staining from rusted-out flange bolts 2) new exhaust riser, ceramic coated and 3) heatshield installed and new ceramic coated wet elbow.
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Old 09-09-2017, 09:00 PM   #20
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very nice. Any testing for before and after temps?
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