Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-13-2012, 03:12 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
charles's Avatar
 
City: patterson
Country: usa
Vessel Model: CHB 45 Pilot House
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 158
Engine Replacement- here is one

Wärtsilä X72 Engines Ordered for 6 New Ships | gCaptain - Maritime & Offshore News
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Charles C Culotta, Jr
Patterson, La.
SUPPORT OUR TROOPS
charles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 04:23 PM   #2
Guru
 
healhustler's Avatar
 
City: Longboat Key, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Bucky
Vessel Model: Krogen Manatee 36 North Sea
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 4,181
Well, for sure the installation of those babies would guarantee a "stand-up" engine room.
__________________

healhustler is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 04:46 PM   #3
Guru
 
ARoss's Avatar
 
City: Chocowinity NC
Vessel Name: My Yuki
Vessel Model: 1973 Marine Trader 34
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 625
Am I correct that this is a seven cylinder engine? I wonder what that crankshaft looks like.
ARoss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2012, 06:03 PM   #4
Enigma
 
RT Firefly's Avatar
 
City: Slicker?
Country: Bumpkin?
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 9,996
Greetings,
bent....
__________________
RTF
RT Firefly is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 01:45 PM   #5
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,714
I wonder if it's cast, built up or machined. The latter not likely of course. The number of cylinders just dictates valve and injection timing basically and of course the crankshaft journal positions is the same on most engines but V4s, V6s, inline twins and probably many others fairly commonly have more than one variant. There aren't many 7 cyl engines though and I've never heard of an 11 cyl but I wouldn't be surprised if one exists. Ric B would prolly know that one.
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 03:10 PM   #6
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
Here's a view of an 11 cylinder engine from the control room level and another view of a crank throw and a connecting rod on that engine. This engine drives a containership.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	mm.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	73.3 KB
ID:	13533   Click image for larger version

Name:	kk.jpg
Views:	92
Size:	150.1 KB
ID:	13534  
RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 04:53 PM   #7
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
I wonder if it's cast, built up or machined. The latter not likely of course.
The cranks are built up of forged pieces. The throws are heated and pressed together with the journals then machined.

It is not unheard of for a crank throw to slip on the journal.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	throw.jpg
Views:	113
Size:	126.6 KB
ID:	13546  
RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2012, 08:42 PM   #8
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,573
Rick, A question on engine rebuilding. Years ago I visited the Sydney navy base where they were refitting a submarine. I was told the diesel engine was being rebuilt and after rebuild they would run it a while and then dismantle it to check the rebuild was perfect.
That seemed a good idea,especially for a sub,but I could see a circularity in it, like after pulling it down to check the rebuild you`d need to run it and pull it down to check...you get the idea.
Is it standard practice to do a pull down check after a major engine rebuild? BruceK
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2012, 07:33 AM   #9
Scraping Paint
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Vessel Model: CHB 48 Zodiac YL 4.2
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,804
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
Is it standard practice to do a pull down check after a major engine rebuild? BruceK
I agree with you in that it would be a never ending circle of assembly run and dismantling.

Can't say as I have ever heard of doing such a thing, we check oil strainers and look at parts that can be viewed by opening a crankcase door or that sort of thing but it is foolish to take a bearing apart of anything as invasive as that.

If the engine is assembled according to specs and test run satisfactorily then it is as it should be. The Navy (and the aviation industry) used to work on the concept of dismantle and inspect at certain hours but has since discovered that doing so created more problems and did more damage than normal wear and tear. That is where condition monitoring came from, do oil samples, vibration analysis, bearing temperature recording, cylinder indicator logging and so on and leave the darn thing alone to do its job.
RickB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2012, 03:28 PM   #10
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,714
Rick B,
Suzuki 2stroke and early Suzuki 4stroke motorcycles had pressed together built up cranks. Great engines all. I had quite a few motorcycles of both configurations including two 750cc water cooled 2 stroke 3cyl motorcycles often called "Water Bufalos". I really liked them. But the built up cranks were probably expensive to make as the type didn't last for more than a few years after the 4strokes came out. I preferred the 2strokes. Rotating or twisting a pin was a very rare occurannce and I believe only happened in racing units.
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2012, 04:19 PM   #11
TF Site Team
 
Larry M's Avatar
 
City: JAX, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hobo
Vessel Model: Krogen 42-120
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 5,742
Quote:
Originally Posted by manyboats View Post
I wonder if it's cast, built up or machined. The latter not likely of course. The number of cylinders just dictates valve and injection timing basically and of course the crankshaft journal positions is the same on most engines but V4s, V6s, inline twins and probably many others fairly commonly have more than one variant. There aren't many 7 cyl engines though and I've never heard of an 11 cyl but I wouldn't be surprised if one exists. Ric B would prolly know that one.
There are 5 cylinder engines still being made for cars, trucks and large commercial ships. We use to have a 1998 Volvo with a 2.5 liter, 5 cylinder engine. The one time we bought spark plugs, the guy at Auto Zone asked if I was buying a spare.
Larry M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-15-2012, 07:01 PM   #12
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 6,371
The November issue of Car and Driver tests a new VW Passat with a 5 cylinder gas engine. This basic engine dates back to the early 80s Audi that people kept pushing down the gas thinking it was the brake pedal resulting in the the infamous unintended acceleration fantasy.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-17-2012, 06:33 PM   #13
JD
Guru
 
JD's Avatar
 
City: New Bern NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Stella Di Mare
Vessel Model: Mainship 34t
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,702
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
The November issue of Car and Driver tests a new VW Passat with a 5 cylinder gas engine. This basic engine dates back to the early 80s Audi that people kept pushing down the gas thinking it was the brake pedal resulting in the the infamous unintended acceleration fantasy.
Which resulted in the system we have now. Must have your foot on the brake to get the selector out of park.

The five cylinder AUDI engine was a very smooth running engine.
JD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2012, 12:09 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 134
G M pickups , Canyon and Colarado 3.7 litre are 5 cyls.
__________________

expat is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012