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Old 03-01-2016, 09:47 PM   #21
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I use a West Marine manual oil extractor-6.5 liter for my Volvo tamd40b engine. Just hook it to the oil extraction tube built into the engine and pump about 20 times and it pulls the oil right out- No mess, no fuss. Best $100 I've spent yet.
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Old 03-02-2016, 01:30 AM   #22
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"I use a West Marine manual oil extractor-6.5 liter for my Volvo tamd40b engine. Just hook it to the oil extraction tube built into the engine and pump about 20 times and it pulls the oil right out- No mess, no fuss. Best $100 I've spent yet."

Me too!
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Old 03-02-2016, 09:39 AM   #23
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Many larger diesels come with manual pumps installed with a hose. I just aged the pump hose in place of the old manual pump. It never occurred to me to worry about the hose then I don't wear suspenders with my belt either.
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Old 03-02-2016, 10:19 AM   #24
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That is the simplest thing to do. I will have to measure and see how high up it really is.
My idea was run the hose to the valve and mount the valve on the inboard engine stringer.
Reaching the engine drain plug might be a stretch,

I will experiment with the electric fuel pump, see if it can pump engine oil.
I would say that the key here is to use hose that's intended for oil.
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Old 03-02-2016, 10:20 AM   #25
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Our boat needs 4-5 oil changes per SE AK cruise, and there's not much space for carrying a big hand-pumped vacuum oil changer or 5-gallon bucket type onboard. We have a Reverso 312 gear pump mounted next to the Volvo 44.

I put the suction hose over the top of the dip stick tube, slightly tighten a small hose clamp on it so it doesn't suck any air, and the Reverso pulls out most of the oil right quick - way faster than the rubber impeller model we had before. Oil goes into a couple of empty gallon oil jugs for disposal. After refilling I have two more clean empty jugs for the next time. Hoses are stored in big ziplocs (three layers of them) and can be shoved back into storage position without concern about spills.

The only difficult part of this is detaching hoses from the pump without dripping much - takes practice, and I'm not always successful (hooray for absorbent pads).
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Old 03-02-2016, 10:24 AM   #26
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Volvo's dipstick tubes (at least on my 63L) go all the way to the bottom of the pan. I was informed by Dick Vosbury to just clamp a hose around the top of dipstick tube, hook up a pump, and you'll get almost all the oil out that is possible.
I have a Volvo and the service manual recommends pumping the oil out through the dipstick tube.

The tube cannot go all the way to the bottom of the pan. If it did, oil couldn't get into the dipstick tube to be measured or pumped out. There has to be some clearance.

I cannot get as much oil of my engine as Volvo claims the capacity is so I'm certainly not replacing all the oil.
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Old 03-02-2016, 12:07 PM   #27
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The tube cannot go all the way to the bottom of the pan. If it did, oil couldn't get into the dipstick tube to be measured or pumped out. There has to be some clearance.
Well, DUH!

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I cannot get as much oil of my engine as Volvo claims the capacity is so I'm certainly not replacing all the oil.
Curious. How much difference are the two values?
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Old 03-02-2016, 03:50 PM   #28
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I have a pair of Perkins Prima 80T marine diesels in my shop that have the slickest little hand pumps I've ever seen for changing oil. They are attatched to the oil pan and look similar to a fresh water old kitchen sink pump. Very interesting, I dont think I would want to pump 10 gallons out with one but I'll bet they work fine for these little engines. I use a gear rotor pump for pulling out oil in my sporty, the same one for fuel cleaning. I pull the engine oil thru the filter system and add it to the bulk fuel tanks. Then burn it.
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Old 03-02-2016, 04:14 PM   #29
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I have a pair of Volvo TAMD41s. One has a hose from the bung on the bottom of the pan, which I use. They both have an oil extraction pipe beside the dipstick pipe, which I have to use on the other engine. I always do my oil changes together. I haven't been able to measure any difference in the amount of oil removed from each engine. I use one of those vacuum pump thingies, so with a thingie capacity that is less than the capacity of each sump, I have to dump part way through. I know my ability to measure is hampered, but still I can't notice any difference between the two.
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Old 03-02-2016, 04:18 PM   #30
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Originally Posted by kulas44 View Post
I have a pair of Perkins Prima 80T marine diesels in my shop that have the slickest little hand pumps I've ever seen for changing oil. They are attatched to the oil pan and look similar to a fresh water old kitchen sink pump. Very interesting, I dont think I would want to pump 10 gallons out with one but I'll bet they work fine for these little engines. I use a gear rotor pump for pulling out oil in my sporty, the same one for fuel cleaning. I pull the engine oil thru the filter system and add it to the bulk fuel tanks. Then burn it.
Same with my Lehman..the stainless hand pump option is cute but at about a cup a stroke...if the oil isn't almost water like....it is a struggle.
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Old 03-02-2016, 04:31 PM   #31
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If one can access the drain plug and there is a space to run a hose to a lower point, a drain valve will work. I have been using a valve from Fumoto USA | Quick and Easy Engine Oil Drain Valves on my truck for around 10 years with no problems. The drain valve simply replaces the old drain plug. In my case, the added benefit is that I did not have to keep a supply of washers to put on the drain plug after every oil change. If one did not use a new washer the drain plug would drip.

The value has to be moved in two directions to open so it is very unlikely to open by accident. Having said that, I put a zip tie on mine to further reduce the chance of the valve opening.

I have NOT put on on my tractor since it climbs over stuff that could smack the valve and break it off. Not likely but not going to risk it either. If there was a chance the valve could get hit by something rolling under the engine I might not use the drain valve.

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Old 03-02-2016, 05:08 PM   #32
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I'm guessing if the drain valve on a boat gets knocked off by hitting something we got bigger problems ahead
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Old 03-02-2016, 07:19 PM   #33
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most boat main engines and generators do not have a valve installed...just a hose from the bottom of the drain pan to a level higher than the oil with a cap installed.

No need to be more complicated unless you are fearful of a hose, not under pressure leaking.
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Old 03-02-2016, 10:43 PM   #34
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most boat main engines and generators do not have a valve installed...just a hose from the bottom of the drain pan to a level higher than the oil with a cap installed.

No need to be more complicated unless you are fearful of a hose, not under pressure leaking.
Yep, no point in having a valve. Just a hose getting away from under the pan, and a cap sealing the hose unless changing oil.

If you have an oil change system, that should have valves on the manifold.
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Old 03-03-2016, 07:36 AM   #35
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I removed the Air-Sep's from my engines and rerouted the hyd hoses used by the air-sep's that pump bypass gunk back into the oil pan to a oil change pump. I attached ball valves to each hose end, no manifold.
I also use the pump to change tranny oil.
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Old 03-03-2016, 11:07 AM   #36
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I do have engine drain plug on the engine pan.
There is about 5 inches height of engine pan to keel base.
I could put a hose fitting instead of the plug with a rubber hose and run it to a valve, then gravity would drain it into a bilge bucket.

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Greetings,
Mr. 717. Why not install a pump?

OP-6 Oil Change Pump - Reverso | Fisheries Supply


Best solution since sliced bread. Ours is a multi-port Oil X-Changer (both engines, both gears, genset), but any brand probably equally useful.

I remember struggling with our single diesel back in the '90s...

Given warm engines and genset, and enough empty 5-gallon buckets, I can now drain all 5 in about 20 minutes. Refilling is a bit more leisurely, but only because of juggling the supply buckets of fresh oil and getting the levels right.

-Chris
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Old 03-03-2016, 02:37 PM   #37
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Refilling is a bit more leisurely, but only because of juggling the supply buckets of fresh oil and getting the levels right.

Sit the 5 gal pail on the engine and use a rattle syphon to move the oil.

Not fast but effortless!
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Old 03-03-2016, 03:03 PM   #38
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Another vote for Fumoto's Qwik-Valve. It solves most all the installation problems and worries about accidental opening. Below is a link to a write-up I did some time ago.

Engine Oil Drain Valve
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Old 03-03-2016, 03:08 PM   #39
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Bay Pelican has a home made drain system. Hoses from each of the main, wing engine, genset and both transmissions to a home made manifold (1/2" brass tees) with ball valves on the manifold end of each hose. All of this is connected to a Depco small pump. Takes a couple of minutes to empty 14 quarts from the main.

Love the system.
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Old 03-03-2016, 03:11 PM   #40
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Refilling is a bit more leisurely, but only because of juggling the supply buckets of fresh oil and getting the levels right.
Quote:
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Sit the 5 gal pail on the engine and use a rattle syphon to move the oil.
Not fast but effortless!

Only have about 5" headroom above engines, unless I remove the saloon hatches... which in turn means moving a sleep-sofa...

Using the pump to fill is much easier.

-Chris
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