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Old 04-04-2014, 01:31 AM   #1
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Diesel Fuel Additive for Extreme Heat

What type of fuel additive is recommended for extremely high heat conditions? We use very high sulfur content fuels and the temperature (at the fuel tank) while the boat is stored usually exceeds 130 degrees during the hot summer months. The humidity is high also so we keep the tank topped off after use.
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Old 04-04-2014, 07:44 AM   #2
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Greetings,
Mr. m. "...usually exceeds 130 degrees..." Holy Crap that's hot!

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Old 04-04-2014, 08:38 AM   #3
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i would start with a good anti algae.
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Old 04-04-2014, 10:53 AM   #4
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Ok, I was planning to start adding a stabilizer, so basically algae and condensation are the two biggest concerns in high heat/humidity which are best controlled with an additive and a full tank.
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Old 04-04-2014, 12:26 PM   #5
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Some sort of stabilizer and a biocide should take care of it.

Note that high sulfur fuel forms acids in lube oil, and also more soot. Modern diesel oils are set up for low sulfur. You may need shorter oil change intervals, do oil analyses, or use a lube designed for high sulfur.
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Old 04-04-2014, 10:23 PM   #6
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Those temperatures will not affect your fuel in any way. Watch for condensation which you seem to have mitigated by topping off tanks. Biocide will do nothing but put a hole in your wallet unless there is already a problem with the bug. If you suspect some water then drain it iff possible or add some ethanol.
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Old 04-05-2014, 06:56 AM   #7
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Those temperatures will not affect your fuel in any way. Watch for condensation which you seem to have mitigated by topping off tanks. Biocide will do nothing but put a hole in your wallet unless there is already a problem with the bug. If you suspect some water then drain it iff possible or add some ethanol.
Are you recommending adding ethanol to diesel fuel?
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Old 04-05-2014, 07:18 AM   #8
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The best way to get rid of water is a proper fuel tank with a sump that can drain off the crud and water before vessel operation.

Second best is oversized filters that can be changed on the fly , and are located outside the engine room .
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Old 04-05-2014, 07:59 AM   #9
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I would have thought the air in Qatar would be fairly dry most of the time, and even if not, the temps are such condensation should be minimal. Here in Queensland, which is humid, and cools down more at night, I still don't have any trouble with growth or condensation, and I never have full tanks, and yet hardly ever get even a teaspoonful of water in my separator filter. However my tanks do drain from the bottom, not via a pickup some distance off the bottom. So in a way I'm removing any crud as soon as it forms. That said, it is minimal as my filters last years - literally. I think you are worrying unnecessarily, but as usual, best thing is ask the locals, even if your Arabic is basic, most who would own a boat there would speak English.
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Old 04-05-2014, 09:00 AM   #10
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Old 04-05-2014, 03:50 PM   #11
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Are you recommending adding ethanol to diesel fuel?
Yes, if any water present cannot be drained and the amount is minimal then it is OK to add ethanol. Relying on filters to remove it won't get the water below the pick up and you will still get the bug.
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Old 04-05-2014, 05:33 PM   #12
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Yes, if any water present cannot be drained and the amount is minimal then it is OK to add ethanol. Relying on filters to remove it won't get the water below the pick up and you will still get the bug.
I have been back and forth with the use of alcohol in diesel....

Seems like half the world will tell you it's going to damage your diesl in a variety of ways and the other half of the world say crap and please tell me just how it will happen.

I'm sure at some concentration of water and alcohol it becomes an issue...but haven't seen any guidance what that level is.
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Old 04-05-2014, 06:12 PM   #13
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I have been back and forth with the use of alcohol in diesel....

Seems like half the world will tell you it's going to damage your diesl in a variety of ways and the other half of the world say crap and please tell me just how it will happen.

I'm sure at some concentration of water and alcohol it becomes an issue...but haven't seen any guidance what that level is.
I used to be in the school of thought that it was a bad thing but since moving to the tropics where condensation and contaminated fuel is a real issue and the additional of ethanol is the usual way to deal with it I have changed my stance. My business, amongst other things, overhauls injectors and I have never seen any damage that could be attributed to using ethanol.
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Old 04-05-2014, 07:06 PM   #14
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I remove water ect in my fuel w an oil changing pump, hose and an easily bendable copper tube. I bend the copper tube so when it's inserted in the small hole in the top of the tank it goes to the lowest point in the tank. I then pump out a quart or so of fuel and examine it for water and crud.

Every time I do this I think I get 100% of the water out. It's a bit of an effort though so I don't do it as often as I should but like Peter I rarely get any water or crud in my samples. And if the bottom of your fuel tanks are level the water will be in one end w full tanks and the other w empty tanks.

When I flew UL aircraft we were worried about water too but it never was a problem.

Like your new avatar Peter. Can see your boat better.
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Old 04-06-2014, 12:59 AM   #15
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I would have thought the air in Qatar would be fairly dry most of the time, and even if not, the temps are such condensation should be minimal.
No it's actually quite humid here since we're surrounded three sides by the Persian Gulf. Right now it's not too hot, between 80's to 100F, but the humidity is in the 80%'s.

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I think you are worrying unnecessarily, but as usual, best thing is ask the locals, even if your Arabic is basic, most who would own a boat there would speak English.
All the recreational boats here run outboards, very few have diesels. The construction machinery is all diesel of course but those guys are no help because they don't need to be meticulous. I need to be ultra-paranoid about my fuel though because I cruise with my family onboard, my diving is 40-100km offshore, it's very lonely out there, the Coast Guard have their own agenda (that's a euphemism for "worthless"). Out in the shipping channels and oil fields I could call upon those resources in an emergency, but that would cause a lot of trouble with the authorities unless it were a true mayday.

Anyway, I appreciate the feedback from everyone. I'll source some stabilizer/biocide, will keep the tank always topped off and will build a small pump with a pickup tube like 'manyboats' mentioned.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:54 AM   #16
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What type of fuel additive is recommended for extremely high heat conditions? We use very high sulfur content fuels...
High sulfur content is a natural deterrent to microbial/bacteria growth. Microbial growth needs water to exist.
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Old 04-06-2014, 09:39 AM   #17
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High sulfur content is a natural deterrent to microbial/bacteria growth. Microbial growth needs water to exist.
You'll not hear this from the magic potion sellers.

As Eric and others say, use a dip tube to check for water. How often are you changing out filters? Read about filtering on boatdiesel.com where a 3 stage setup - 30u, 10u and on engine is recommended and conforms with current rigorous common rail engine requirements. With a filter setup like this and no water in tanks you'll sleep well.
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Old 04-06-2014, 12:29 PM   #18
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Once again - "Soltron"
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Old 04-06-2014, 12:52 PM   #19
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If you have a siphon tube you may (w good filtration) have less contaminants in your fuel fed to the engine but you will always have water in the bottom of the tank unless you drain it w a perfectly placed drain that drains out of the bottom of the tank in the lowest place. Otherwise it will be there always unless you remove it in some way.
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Old 04-06-2014, 01:43 PM   #20
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Adding Soltron to diesel fuel will not hurt, as 99.5% of the product is already in the diesel fuel. It is then - and with no surprise - we read:
"Soltron™ is pure fuel and will not hurt any engine if overdosed."


The best solution to avoiding "diesel bug" is preventative maintenance.
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