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Old 06-21-2012, 04:58 PM   #1
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Diesel fuel additive

Has anybody had experience with ValvTect Bioguard plus 6 fuel additive - It was recommended to me,and has good looking specs

ValvTect - BioGuard Plus 6

I would appreciate input

---Deke
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Old 06-22-2012, 12:28 PM   #2
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It looks like you are in the northern colder climate area by the back ground, which does not have the algae/bug problem like the south. However, for the last 10+ years I been using the Power Service DIESEL 9?1?1 For Winter Emergencies: Winter Rescue Formula ? use to reliquefy gelled fuel and de-ice frozen fuel-filters. 911 diesel additives sold at auto stores. The 911, red bottle, absorbs water back into the diesel, plus Diesel slick lubrications. No water/moisture not algae/bugs. Also since the tanks are full there is condensation in the tank which equates to water/moisture. When the tank is low and before taking on new diesel in the spring, I add Power Service Diesel Supplement, white bottle, which increases Cetane and prevents anti gelling.

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Old 06-22-2012, 03:43 PM   #3
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Diesel Fuel Additive

You are correct - We keep our boat in the Pacific Northwest (Orcas Island)

What attracted me to this product is that it seems to be an all in one additive:

"BioGuard Plus 6™ contains BioGuard7, the industry’s most effective microbiocide to prevent biological growth and corrosion of your fuel tank and engine system.
BioGuard Plus 6™ also contains Diesel Guard Supreme multifunctional diesel additive that contains stabilizer, moisture dispersant, corrosion inhibitor, detergent, cetane improver and VT 101™ lubricity improver."

Is it a problem to have all of that in one?
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Old 06-22-2012, 03:46 PM   #4
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Does it give back rubs too?

Sd
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Old 06-22-2012, 04:02 PM   #5
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Greetings,
I think the subject of diesel fuel additives has been discussed before. Other than "bug" prevention any other "claims" seem to be in the realm of snake oil salesmen.
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Old 06-22-2012, 09:14 PM   #6
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Greetings,
I think the subject of diesel fuel additives has been discussed before. Other than "bug" prevention any other "claims" seem to be in the realm of snake oil salesmen.
------------------------------------------------
The only thing that's ever been added to my fuel tanks, other than diesel, is air and . . . . one gallon of gasoline . . . Ooops!!
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Old 06-23-2012, 08:13 AM   #7
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Keep your tanks full

Probably the best way to avoid bio growth is to keep your tanks full of fuel. This lessens the chance of condensation resulting in bio growth. If you get bio growth due to water in the tanks and use a bio growth killer you still have the dead bio matter to contend with that could possibly clog your filters.

Some of the "experts" on boatdiesel.com recommend no additives and full fuel tanks. If you have big tanks and old fuel then perhaps using a cetane boost would help, I don't know for sure.
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Old 06-23-2012, 12:07 PM   #8
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Have it all in one is Ok. However, when addressing one or two concerns use an additive specific for that might be better.



Using 400 gallon per uear for 15 yeras in our 32 year tanks, 1/2 full the filter show no sign of dirt or water. So the additives seem to be working. Howerver I do polish/clean the fuel also. If you use/turn the fuel there should be no problem.

With large tanks there are pro and coms about how full they are?
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Old 06-27-2012, 09:24 AM   #9
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If you're buying ValvTect Marine Diesel fuel, you are already getting the additive. Of course if you travel, you'll likely be buying a different brand of fuel at each stop.

ValvTect - Valvtect Marine Diesel

Quote:
ValvTect Marine Diesel with BioGuard™ is "specially formulated" for your marine diesel engine. It requires no additional fuel additives to protect your engine, eliminating any risk of improper additive use and saves time and money. ValvTect Marine Diesel with BioGuard™ protects your marine engine with these additional features and benefits.
At the prices we are paying for fuel, we shouldn't have to add anything to it.
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Old 06-29-2012, 06:48 AM   #10
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Bugs come IN the fuel as well as in the air that enters as fuel is used .

The key (according to Practical Sailor ) is to vary the bug killers , as none kill ALL the bugs.

2 or 3 different brands , used in tern will help .

The other use for additives is fuel system cleaning , Stanadine will clean it out in an hours run , if not its R&R time.

Some folks worry about lubricity on our ancient fuel systems . a gallon of cheap 2 stroke outboard oil per 100G of diesel seems to work.

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Old 06-29-2012, 08:20 AM   #11
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Bugs come IN the fuel as well as in the air that enters as fuel is used .

The key (according to Practical Sailor ) is to vary the bug killers , as none kill ALL the bugs.

2 or 3 different brands , used in tern will help .

The other use for additives is fuel system cleaning , Stanadine will clean it out in an hours run , if not its R&R time.

Some folks worry about lubricity on our ancient fuel systems . a gallon of cheap 2 stroke outboard oil per 100G of diesel seems to work.

FF
On the other hand, I've seen seports from people that some additives are not compatible with certain other additives and will create a gell.

I've also seen the recommendation to add gasoline (yes, gasoline) to diesel fuel.

We can't possibly follow all the advice given on web forums because much of it is contradictory. And of course, given a basic knowledge of the way things work, some is just plain stupid or dangerous.

As I posted above, for the price we're paying for fuel, we shouldn't have to add anything to it.
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Old 06-29-2012, 08:46 AM   #12
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As I posted above, for the price we're paying for fuel, we shouldn't have to add anything to it.
And you are absolutely correct. You don't need to add anything at all.
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Old 06-29-2012, 04:21 PM   #13
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Rick B is right (as usual) but I think is is definitely a good thing to do. We don't use our fuel fast enough to run dependably w/o a stabilizer and anti-microbe additive. If we were running a boat used daily we wouldn't need anything as Rick suggests ....... But we don't.
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Old 06-29-2012, 09:21 PM   #14
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And you are absolutely correct. You don't need to add anything at all.
-------------------------------------------------
Can't speak for tropical climates, but I have been running diesel boats for over 40 years in the PNW and have never added anything to my fuel. I burn about 1/3 of my diesel tank capacity per year and have never had fuel or tank problems. Just keep them full and the lids on tight.

If you're concerned about sludge, bugs or water, then by all means, polish your fuel. That's better than adding snake oil to your fuel tanks.

IMHO
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Old 06-30-2012, 06:36 AM   #15
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Bugs cant live with out water.

No Water , no BUGS!

Usually this required a better servicible fuel tank than found on most boats, AND someone to do the work.

IF the pickup was from the absolute lowest point in the tank, "polishing" could work.

Sadly this is seldom the case.

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Old 06-30-2012, 06:10 PM   #16
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I will chime in with what I learned from the guy that cleaned my fuel tanks this weekend. He has been dealing with diesel fuel oil for 35 years and clean everything from little boats like ours to train takers and military ships. If you have had your tanks cleaned, you know there is quite a bit of downtime while the fuel scrubs. We had some time and he was happy to share his info.

Bug magnets don't work. The Coast Guard at Fort Macon spent over a million bucks to try the system in their boats. After a year, he asked the fleet commander what he thought. He said, "Let me rub a magnet on your head and see if you get any smarter." Enough said...

As for liquid additives, he says that because the price is so high, demand has dropped. Therefore, unused fuel sits in stockyards long enough that the storage facilities are trying industrial additives to keep the growth down, so the consumer grade stuff could do more harm than good. Without knowing what is already in the fuel, adding another chemical to it is unwise.

As for keeping your tanks full, the ONLY way that could possibly work is to keep your vent blocked, but there is no way to keep all the humid air out and there is not nearly enough air in there, full or empty to make a difference.

Finally, the days of high quality Saudi fuel are over and the sandy crap fuel we are getting from Canada (thus that pipeline) and from Venezuela has a shelf life of about 90 days. So the best tip he could give me to avoid growth is to USE YOUR FUEL. Only put onboard what you will use in three or four months.

Look for fuel with a long MIL# (military approved) and buy from a busy station. (<- This I am not sure I remember 100%). They do their homework before they approve it for military use.

He gave me some homework. Get two jars of fuel. Fill them both 3/4 full with diesel. Seal one and put holes in the lid of the other. Come back in three months. He would not tell me what would happen, but I suspect they will be just about the same.

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Old 06-30-2012, 09:18 PM   #17
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I will chime in with what I learned from the guy that cleaned my fuel tanks this weekend. He has been dealing with diesel fuel oil for 35 years and clean everything from little boats like ours to train takers and military ships. If you have had your tanks cleaned, you know there is quite a bit of downtime while the fuel scrubs. We had some time and he was happy to share his info.

Bug magnets don't work. The Coast Guard at Fort Macon spent over a million bucks to try the system in their boats. After a year, he asked the fleet commander what he thought. He said, "Let me rub a magnet on your head and see if you get any smarter." Enough said...

As for liquid additives, he says that because the price is so high, demand has dropped. Therefore, unused fuel sits in stockyards long enough that the storage facilities are trying industrial additives to keep the growth down, so the consumer grade stuff could do more harm than good. Without knowing what is already in the fuel, adding another chemical to it is unwise.

As for keeping your tanks full, the ONLY way that could possibly work is to keep your vent blocked, but there is no way to keep all the humid air out and there is not nearly enough air in there, full or empty to make a difference.

Finally, the days of high quality Saudi fuel are over and the sandy crap fuel we are getting from Canada (thus that pipeline) and from Venezuela has a shelf life of about 90 days. So the best tip he could give me to avoid growth is to USE YOUR FUEL. Only put onboard what you will use in three or four months.

Look for fuel with a long MIL# (military approved) and buy from a busy station. (<- This I am not sure I remember 100%). They do their homework before they approve it for military use.

He gave me some homework. Get two jars of fuel. Fill them both 3/4 full with diesel. Seal one and put holes in the lid of the other. Come back in three months. He would not tell me what would happen, but I suspect they will be just about the same.

Tom-
About the same advice I give and get!
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Old 06-30-2012, 11:31 PM   #18
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I don't know if you want to believe the oil refining industry, but is on their site as the official version of "How water gets into Diesel".

This one is from Exxon Mobil's site, but is based on studies by Advanced Fuel Solutions (AFS):

www.exxon.com/USA-English/GFM/Products_Services/
Water in a fuel storage tank can cause operational problems
Source: Advanced Fuel Solutions


Tank maintenance is an essential part of any successful premium diesel or heating oil program. As little as .01% (100ppm) water in a fuel storage tank can cause operational problems. Water cannot be completely eliminated from distillate fuels. It can get into the fuel at various stages as it progresses through the distribution network from the refinery to the end-user. Water can get into the fuel during its production, when the hot fuel is in contact with process water. Most of this water is removed in the stripping units at the refinery and more will separate as the fuel cools, but still, some water remains in solution with the diesel. This entrained water may cause a haze in distillate fuel.

Most of the water present in fuels will drop out as it is heavier than the fuel and will sink to the bottom if given time. The temperature of the fuel has an impact on its water-shedding tendencies as well. Warmer fuel can hold more water in suspension than can colder fuel. Water can also be introduced during transportation and storage of the fuel as well. Sea-going vessels can sometimes introduce water into distillate fuel, which can then drop out into storage tanks. Tanks themselves have inherent problems at roof seals and vent pipes which can allow rain water to seep into the system. During fuel withdrawals, tanks can breathe in large volumes of humid air. Moisture in the air will condense when the ambient temperature falls, collecting in tank bottoms. This is particularly prevalent in the spring and fall when the day-night temperature fluctuations can be extreme.
There are numerous ways in which the water can get into the fuel storage and delivery system, now let's look at the problems it can cause.

In cold weather, many water-related problems are incorrectly attributed to the fuel. Water in tanks can freeze 20oF - 30oF above the temperature at which fuel-related problems begin (cloud point). Ice crystals can build up on filters, restricting flow and compromising performance. They can also restrict fuel flow in tank pumping lines.
In warmer weather, the presence of water in tanks may encourage the growth of fungi or bacteria which live in the tank water bottoms and feed on the fuel. Under the power of a microscope, these bugs look like deep-sea creatures. To the naked eye, these bugs show up as slimy mats of substance that can be any color from green to black. Under ideal conditions, these bacteria can double in number in as little as four hours. When left unchecked, they can be drawn out through suction lines and plug filters. In addition, the by-products of their fuel consumption are very acidic and can cause pitting and decay in tank bottoms. Many tanks go unchecked for years, accumulating water from any number of sources. When fuel inventory is low, water bottoms can be stirred up during deliveries, and if not allowed to settle out, can be suctioned out into a transport truck or into a diesel vehicle's tank.
Water also causes corrosion in storage tanks and engine systems. The by-products of this corrosion, including scale and rust, can all lead to filter plugging or injector fouling and can help make a stable emulsion.
Fuel injection pumps are often times lubricated only by the fuel they are pumping and are, therefore, very susceptible to seizing if water gets into them. These high-pressure pumps are not at all tolerant of dirt, debris and organic deposits, all of which can be carried into them with water. The barrel and plunger clearance is often times only 1-2 microns. This tight tolerance is necessary to maintain fuel injection pressures and ensure minimal leakage past the plunger shaft.
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Old 07-01-2012, 02:47 AM   #19
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On the advice of everyone we talked to associated with the marine diesel manufacturing, servicing, and repair industry when we got our boat 14 years ago we have added Hammonds Biobor and Hammonds Select-3 (since replaced with a newer Hammonds product) to our fuel from the outset. I have no idea if these two additives make any difference at all, but we have never gotten so much as a drop of water in our fuel (our tanks all gravity feed from their lowest points so everything in the tanks goes through the filters) and the filter elements coming out at changeover time look just like the filters going in other than being darker due to being wet with fuel).

I don't know enough about the fuel industry to argue for or against additives. We simply do what people we determined to be extremely experienced across the range of marine diesel propulsion and generator design, manufacturing, service, and repair advised us to do.

And to date our engines start immediately, run smoothly throughout their range, don't smoke except at cold startup, and use no more oil today than they did 14 years ago, which is to say a quart or less every 100-150 hours.

This could all end next week, of course, but that's been our experience thus far.
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Old 07-01-2012, 07:03 AM   #20
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Cheap insurance is to PRE FILTER the fuel as it is pumped into your tank.

A Baja style filter is fine as it will catch water and any particles that may be present.

Loads slower than dumping in the 2 inch fill and 100GPM setup at the fish boat docks , but far better.

Gave a great Rybofitch filter made of Monel , from the old days that was found at a flea market.

We make a point of fueling with it at all smaller fuel stops.

Up to a cup of water found at times, with the std 20gallon fill on our sail boat.

Industry specifications are great , but that is seldom what is pumped into your tank.

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