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Old 02-14-2014, 05:30 PM   #21
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Bennett,

I agree with psneeld. If you like the lines, and it is something you think you want to do, do it! Having said that, spend some serious time on the boat before you offer anything. Crawl around, get in the engine compartment and other areas with a flashlight and just look for a few hours. Everything people are saying is very true, these things cost a lot of money to keep and especially fix up. After you look at it and think, yeah, I can do that, then get a professional. Make SURE to check the references and really call some of the people they surveyed a boat for. Ask for the last 5 people or so. My boat had what appeared to be an extremely thorough survey by a reputable company but they missed a lot of things. But, there are a lot of things to miss. Lot's of things... Part of the survey is for the surveyor or yard to start the engines. They won't go through them for you but should give a general overall impression on them. After that, make an offer if you want. Make it contingent on oil analysis, etc. But make it contingent on something. I would go low. A boat my wife and I were looking at for several weeks was at $39,000.00 The owners took $12,000!! And not from us! We wished we had moved on it when we had the chance. I talked to the yard quite a bit and the motor and genset didn't even put out any smoke at all when finally started after 3 years. Now that is in part because the yard was good and knew what they were doing. Things to look for on this type of boat- well everything but especially soft decks and leaks. These things leak everywhere- top and bottom. Get a fat friend, (JK- just some weight!) and walk the decks and see what will flex. Look at all the windows and physically press, hard, on the frames and under them. You will have to fix all of this one way or another. There are some folks that say they would take all of the wood coring out of everything and completely replace everything with new, high end woods and epoxies, etc. I don't know if I follow that logic or not. I think you need to fix things good enough to be safe, to yourself, crew and the area you boat- No Corners on that!! But, how much you actually put into the boat to make it what you want is up to you. When I got my boat and started telling my friends all that I was going to do they each put up their hand and said don't forget to use it! Good advice from fellow trawler owners. (well, one was a rag bagger but oh, well) Sorry for the long post but I would hate to see you miss out on an opportunity that was presented if it is something you REALLY want to do. Just listen to the advice of others and be cautious. There are a lot of boats out there. Learn as much as you can. If you don't have any boating background I agree with the other folks and would caution you on purchasing something as unknown as this. But, maybe you have a bunch of money and want a project- well then step right up because have we got a deal for you! Have fun and great luck with this!
~Jeff
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Old 02-14-2014, 09:43 PM   #22
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Wilst agreeing with most of the above post - and also that of psneeld, make sure if you haven't already to read all of this thread…
Replacing My Teak Deck After 47 Years
'nuff said..?
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Old 02-15-2014, 11:06 AM   #23
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Pete,
Yeah, that is a great thread. I hope when the time comes to do my decks in the next couple of years to even come close to what he is doing. A great example of doing it right. AND how much work it really takes to get these boats going sometimes.
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Old 02-15-2014, 12:07 PM   #24
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Bennett,

I'm not going to comment on this particular boat but let me offer some suggestions I routinely give to friends who are considering buying a used boat.

1. The wrong boat, at the best price in the world, is still the wrong boat. It must suit your needs, it must fit within your ability to do the work, it must fit your budget and it must make your heart flutter a bit when you walk up to it.

I could go on and on with that list of "it must...", but you get the picture.

2. Do your due diligence. Like was mentioned above, crawl around the bilge with a flashlight looking for signs that the bilge had been under water. It's a bit more difficult to spot things that tell you to run away from a particular boat than it is to spot things that tell you to buy it.

3. Don't let your emotions overrun you common sense. You've already formed an emotional attachment to the boat, and that's good up to a point. That point is when the emotional attachment overrides your good sense, back away and try to be more objective. Take a HARD look at the boat, then have it surveyed.

4. You mentioned you wanted this boat for retirement. Don't spend all of your retirement money getting this boat ready. Restoring boats is like restoring collector cars. You NEVER get your money's worth out of the resto so it's better to let someone else do the resto and then buy it from them. There are hundreds of thousands of used boats on the market. Make sure you're not buying someone else's money pit. There's a reason why the yard is selling it cheap. It's likely they know how much it would cost THEM to get it ready to cruise and to them it doesn't pencil out.

Good luck.
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Old 02-16-2014, 08:28 AM   #25
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Overlooked most times is how the boat LOOKS!

Sure a roomaran may have huge interior volume , but your boat MUST make you happy , every time you walk up to her.

Not many boats are really beautiful, the best chance of finding one is from the board of a master , not a computer geek.
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:31 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Pau Hana View Post
If the vessel is in the water, have the yard start it up- if damage occurs, it's on them. Before committing, I'd have the vessel surveyed- mechanical and hull. This may save you tens of thousands in the long run.....
IMO this is the advice you should heed.
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Old 02-16-2014, 01:58 PM   #27
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FF-to me, a very good point. Being a bit old fashioned when it comes boat design (not to say I like old boats, ours is a 2009), I have to like and appreciate the lines on a boat before I can truly "like" everything else on the boat. My biggest beef with most of the "passagemaker" trawlers today is that most are really unattractive looking boats. I still love the feeling of walking down the dock in the morning and realizing "Damn, that is a really good looking boat!"
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Old 02-16-2014, 03:13 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by THD View Post
FF-to me, a very good point. Being a bit old fashioned when it comes boat design (not to say I like old boats, ours is a 2009), I have to like and appreciate the lines on a boat before I can truly "like" everything else on the boat. My biggest beef with most of the "passagemaker" trawlers today is that most are really unattractive looking boats. I still love the feeling of walking down the dock in the morning and realizing "Damn, that is a really good looking boat!"
I'm not so certain that you need to initially love your boat. Seaweed was not a "love at first sight" boat -- indeed her name came about because she rather grew on me.

The internal layout is important though. For me, galley up was a must. A friend cruises on his galley down boat and prefers it. Does your better half prefer an aft cabin layout or does she like the forward area best?

These are questions you and your spouse need to know BEFORE you you lay down cash.

The power plant is important but more than that is the ACCESS to all the components of your engine, generator, etc. The oil needs to be changed, belts replaced, pumps too, impellers, fuel filters, and more. If getting into the holy place is restricted you'll miss stuff. You won't see that oozing leak if you can't easily put eyeballs on the motor.

But love? You'll come to love the boat you buy, even if initially she wasn't the dream boat you'd imagined.
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