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Old 10-24-2015, 10:11 AM   #21
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Depending on the engine and the garden hose flow, most larger engines will pump more than the garden hose can provide. So if you leave sea cock open, it will draw in a mix of fresh and sea water. That's why I close the sea cock and just stuff the hose in the open strainer. Then it pulls in a mix of fresh water and air, and no sea water. If system is sealed up aside from the fresh water hose, it will pull a partial vacuum on the strainer, but that won't hurt anything. And yes, if hose collapses, it is only collapsing partially, water is still flowing. It does not need much water to do a flush at idle.
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Old 10-25-2015, 12:31 AM   #22
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Timjet,
I have never seen a manufacturers claim that their engines are designed to last in salt water without flushing, although they do not seem to encourage it either! (of course they want to sell you a new one as often as possible)
Bottom line is that if you run in salt water, you can add much to the reliability and longevity of your motor if you do flush it regularly.
It goes beyond the engine too, stern tubes come to mind, I have seen many shafts damaged from sitting too long in salt water, and dripless packing glands are particularly vulnerable.
Flushing becomes more critical the less the boat is used.
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Old 10-25-2015, 05:52 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kapnd View Post
Timjet,
Bottom line is that if you run in salt water, you can add much to the reliability and longevity of your motor if you do flush it regularly.
It goes beyond the engine too, stern tubes come to mind, I have seen many shafts damaged from sitting too long in salt water, and dripless packing glands are particularly vulnerable.
Flushing becomes more critical the less the boat is used.
Agreed. It's why I flush mine. I'm willing to take the risk of screwing up the procedure.

Every time I'm at the boat and am not going to take it out I try and remember to turn the steering wheel stop to stop a couple of times. This flushes the stale saltwater out of the rudder packing glad and will prevent crevice corrosion. I had to replace a rudder shaft because of crevice corrosion.
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