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Old 01-10-2011, 02:41 PM   #41
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

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Moonstruck wrote:Grounding is a real problem as most of the areas south of the Chesapeake* have allot of shallow water around.* Fortunately, most of it is soft bottom.*
Well, people relate things to their own surroundings.* I'm not sure if I regard running gently into a mud bank even as a "grounding."* Out here, a grounding generally involves a major, very expensive repair because what you hit is generally a rock or a rock ledge or reef.* Not much in the way of shallow mud banks around here.* You're either floating or you're on the rocks at a 45-degree angle when the tide goes out from under your boat.

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Old 01-10-2011, 02:51 PM   #42
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

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Well, people relate things to their own surroundings.* I'm not sure if I regard running gently into a mud bank even as a "grounding."* Out here, a grounding generally involves a major, very expensive repair because what you hit is generally a rock or a rock ledge or reef.* Not much in the way of shallow mud banks around here.* You're either floating or you're on the rocks at a 45-degree angle when the tide goes out from under your boat.


*
It is true that the*farther north there is much solid rock that can cause severe damage.* The good thing about that is that it takes an earth quake to move it.* With the shifting bottoms that we have, I have seen boats aground between a red and green marker.* Dredging channels is a reality.* There is alot of coral rock in the Bahamas and some in the Keys.* There is some on the OWW.* For the most part it is soft.

When you hit anything at 20 knots, it is not gentle.* Usually something has to give.* I just want to know what that is on a pod drive.* Some times it can mean bent running gear and damaged transmissions on a conventional drive.

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Old 01-10-2011, 02:55 PM   #43
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

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Moonstruck wrote:The question was, " would the pod drive break off at a 20 knot soft grounding".* I am not defending any system.* Just trying to figure out what I would buy in the future.* I was surprised that there was so little damage done at that speed.

Grounding is a real problem as most of the areas south of the Chesapeake* have allot of shallow water around.* Fortunately, most of it is soft bottom.* Much of the ICW runs behind inlets that make the channel subject to shoaling.* Our bottoms shift with the currents and storms.*Soft groundings are commonplace.* I just want to know what happens.

-- Edited by Moonstruck on Monday 10th of January 2011 03:28:19 PM
My thought is that the Pods are no more exposed than Stabilizers.* Yes they do get taken off but it isn't an everyday problem.* Maybe we need to take our heads out and keep a better watch.* Well at least if we have Pods.

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Old 01-10-2011, 03:15 PM   #44
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

One thing good about an old slow boat is you cannot run aground at 20knots. The few times I have read about such accidents they have resulted serious injuries to the crew. Accidents happen when they are least expected and people can be thrown about with bad results.* Boat damage seems unimportant when people are hurt or worse.* I am pretty sure pod systems are built to take soft groundings at low speed. Don't know if they test them to destruction.*

Take care be safe.
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Old 01-10-2011, 04:38 PM   #45
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

To me the most desirable drive would be a single screw protected by a keel and skeg.* Krogen and Nordhavn and porbably others protect their twin screw running gear with skegs.* Seems like a good solution to me.

With bow and stern thrusters available it seems to me that adding computers to control the boat is just complicating the mix.* I'm kind of in Eric's camp on simpler is better.
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Old 01-10-2011, 04:51 PM   #46
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

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* Maybe we need to take our heads out and keep a better watch.* Well at least if we have Pods.


*
JD, I think that you are in NC.* Watch it at the Alligator River entrance,*in Bogue Sound, both channels going into Beaufort, behind Bogue Inlet, at the White Oak River junction at Swansboro, behind Bear Inlet, New River crossing,*behind Carolina Beach, and Snow's Cut just to name a few.* You don't have to be out of the marked channel to run aground.* That is just one section of the ICW.* Those Tow Boat/US and Seatow boats don't hang around for nothing.

I subscribe to the theory that those that cruise the ICW and haven't run aground probably will.* I operate my boat accordingly.* My charts are full of notes.* The above was from memory.* The charts are on the boat.

*
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Old 01-10-2011, 05:06 PM   #47
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

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With bow and stern thrusters available it seems to me that adding computers to control the boat is just complicating the mix.* I'm kind of in Eric's camp on simpler is better.
Simpler is better unless you are going for efficiency, flexibility, and capability.* You can do things with pod drives you cannot even come close to with conventional drives.* You can do things with power boats you cannot come close to doing with a rowboat even though a rowboat is a lot simpler than a powerboat.

So it all boils down to what you want to accomplish. Simple accomlishes simple things, complex accomplishes complex things. My wife would like to be able to park our boat in any slip, on any dock, in any wind, in any current with a single stick or better yet, a couple of pushbuttons.* She doesn't want to jockey throttles and shifters and rudders because she's not interested in that stuff.* She loves boating and driving the boat*but she wants maneuvering to be* an absolutley no-brainer operation.

Can't do that with shafts, props, shift levers,*and rudders.* You can do it with pod drives.


It's my understanding that the pod drives are designed to shear off outside the hull if they strike something.* So no big hole in the bottom of the boat.** Pricey to replace, I'm sure, but so are shafts, props, rudders, V-struts and bottom damage.
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Old 01-10-2011, 05:19 PM   #48
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

Hey Lurker,Speak'in of going aground it looks like you hav'nt got any problem w that judging by your avitar. *Efficiency? I don't think the average yachtsman's going to pay for his pod drives w fuel savings. As to my twin keel idea one would make the keels smaller and skinnier and faired on the trailing edge so the drag should be about the same. The same as the original keel not the pods. And if a guy said no the the pods he could prolly buy a 5 or 10' bigger boat w the savings. I'd much rather have a diesel electric drive or a completely custom boat w the savings from saying no to pod drive. Just say no to pods.
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Old 01-10-2011, 10:46 PM   #49
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RE: Conventional or POD Drives?

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*
JD wrote:* Maybe we need to take our heads out and keep a better watch.* Well at least if we have Pods.JD, I think that you are in NC.* Watch it at the Alligator River entrance,*in Bogue Sound, both channels going into Beaufort, behind Bogue Inlet, at the White Oak River junction at Swansboro, behind Bear Inlet, New River crossing,*behind Carolina Beach, and Snow's Cut just to name a few.* You don't have to be out of the marked channel to run aground.* That is just one section of the ICW.* Those Tow Boat/US and Seatow boats don't hang around for nothing.

I subscribe to the theory that those that cruise the ICW and haven't run aground probably will.* I operate my boat accordingly.* My charts are full of notes.* The above was from memory.* The charts are on the boat.
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Moonstruck,

I have been through almost all of those places and a few more here in NC with two different sailboats of over 5' 6"*draft.* For the most part if you stay in the channel you will be just fine.* Now I'm not talking about the channel on your chart plotter, I'm talking about looking forward and aft at the markers.* The channel does change and here in NC you must look out for the cans and nuns, not to mention the occasional green floater*or red ball.* I have run aground several times with the sailboat but one time was my fault (didn't pick up the markers switching sides at Oregon Inlet and Old House Channel*due to a dredge in operation) and one time two years ago in Adams Creek when a 60' Sportfish rolled me out of the channel with his wake.***Ocracoke Inlet is a tough one but all you have to do is ask for help from any*one of the Ferry Captains or the USCG station*and they will advise you as to where the problems are.* It is usually at G11 that the shoaling happens and there usually are a couple of cans out.* If you line up the Day Marks and don't see the cans you are going to bump.*

I think if you use common sense and are careful there won't be much of a problem.* BTW common sense includes looking out side at the*Day Marks, looking at the chart plotter and also looking at the depth finder.* The Ocracoke Inlet is 12' for the most part and when the depth finder starts reading 6' you are headed the wrong way.*
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