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Old 08-30-2016, 08:39 PM   #41
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Installing a thruster tube in a glass boat is a simple one day job for a handy fella with average DIY skills. Hell if I can do it anyone can
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Old 08-30-2016, 08:42 PM   #42
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Here's another one ...
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Old 08-30-2016, 09:14 PM   #43
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Installing a thruster tube in a glass boat is a simple one day job for a handy fella with average DIY skills. Hell if I can do it anyone can
Agree. Well, maybe more than a day. I did the inside layup in a day, and did the outside layup and fairing another day. But certainly in the realm of most DIY.
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Old 08-30-2016, 10:20 PM   #44
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So, installing an electric bow thruster is not rocket science. Believe it not, the hole was cut with a jig saw. Just take your time. The unit is a Vetus 8 hp. Fiberglassing was done by a good glass guy and took about a week at two or three hours a day to build up and fair the lip. I installed the hardware and electrical hook up. Battery is fitted in next compartment aft. Charger is installed in another compartment. I was lucky to have multiple compartments under the V berth. The cost of the unit was $3,800. I paid my fiberglass guy about $750. Rest was on me.


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Old 08-30-2016, 10:28 PM   #45
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One thing to remember is the hole being cut in the hull is not a round circle, its an ellipse, because the tube is not going thru at 90 degrees.
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Old 08-30-2016, 11:26 PM   #46
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Uhh. Yup. Look at photo three at the tube extension through the hull. I scribed the end of the tube to the angle of the bow entry and used that to mark the cut on the hull. It's not really an ellipse, it's a flattened circle. The top side is a different shape than the bottom.


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Old 08-30-2016, 11:35 PM   #47
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"A shape that resembles a flattened circle", Merriam Webster
"A closed plane curve shaped like an oval" Websters Dictionary


sort of sounds like an ellipse to me, but then I aint no math master.
The fellow that told me that had a Masters in Engineering as I was about to cut a big hole in the side of a biggish wood boat for one.
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Old 08-31-2016, 12:33 AM   #48
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I never regretted fitting a bow thruster for one minute but I would add one caveat, whatever size the salesman or manufacturer tell you, fit one two sizes larger, you'll thank me in years to come.
The sales people just want a sale.
If it seems expensive some people may walk away and they lose a commission.
On the other hand, you have to live with your decision for the life of the boat.
Trust me.
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Old 08-31-2016, 04:01 AM   #49
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I don't mean to monopolize your thread but the following may also be of interest to you.


I studied many installations before fitting mine and from watching other skippers get into a muddle when close quarters manoeuvring I designed my own system that has proven itself time after time.
I've seen lever operated, button operated, twist grip operated and as it wasn't ergonomic some skippers seemed to get in a tizz if a maneouver became complicated.
I thought 'out of the box and came up with my idea/invention.
None of the companies I approached could supply a single lever control to do the function I required so I 'spoke' to 'Hopcar' a TF commercial member, he's very helpful and supplied me with 2 controls and shipped them over to me at a very good price .

I bought a Morse 1700 series single lever control with combined rocker switch (it's original function was to raise and lower large outboard engines).

By fitting solenoids a light cable is used to the solenoid to activate the thruster.
Up on the rocker switch goes right and down goes left.
I hope you find this helpful.
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Old 08-31-2016, 07:59 AM   #50
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Doubt any thruster would be much help in a seven knot current,unless it is way ,way oversized.Worked on the staten island ferries for many years,where the typical east river current can be as much as five knots,and without warping fingers,the ferries would never get in.Typically,they have to bounce off a couple of times,and then some major throttle to get the boat lined up.
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Old 08-31-2016, 08:15 AM   #51
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Has there been any mention of retractable thrusters? Side Power and others make them.
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Old 08-31-2016, 08:24 AM   #52
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Add oh, by the way, I learned that with two engines and a bow thruster Those of you with two engines and no bow thruster good luck with that.

Gordon
Heck, I can do that with a single and no bow thruster.

It's called a spring line.
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Old 08-31-2016, 09:10 AM   #53
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Heck, I can do that with a single and no bow thruster.

It's called a spring line.
A spring line only works if it's on a dock or piling. It will do nothing for you until then.
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Old 08-31-2016, 09:39 AM   #54
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A spring line only works if it's on a dock or piling. It will do nothing for you until then.
Yeah you're right. But then I rarely recall ever finding the need to move directly
sideways in open water.

Nor can I remember not being able to get close enough to a dock to use a spring line.

Of course YMMV.
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Old 09-03-2016, 09:04 AM   #55
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Moving sideways

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Yeah you're right. But then I rarely recall ever finding the need to move directly
sideways in open water.

Nor can I remember not being able to get close enough to a dock to use a spring line.

Of course YMMV.
On more than a couple of locations, dockmaster's have placed me on a bulkhead in a space just large enough for my boat and in the middle of two other boats. Coming in at an angle just would not work very well. However being able to go completely sideways into the space is a big boon in such a situation.

Gordon
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Old 09-03-2016, 09:31 AM   #56
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Best Bow Thruster ?
Weasmar
Vetus
Side Power
12/24 VDC
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Old 09-03-2016, 09:57 AM   #57
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Vetus. Yes I use them when I dock. Its simply easier to use my rudder position indicator and center the rudder, then steer into the slip with a little tweak of the thrusters. Stress free is good. When the wind kicks up they can help what I am doing with steering and power application, but if it is windy enough they are useless.

The wind almost always comes from the same direction at our marina, and I am docked next to a boat about ten feet longer than mine and he blocks a lot of my wind. When the bow of my boat starts to have the wind blocked by his boat, the stern gets kicked to the port side, and the stern thruster can help with small adjustments.

Yup. Got 'em and use 'em and not ashamed about it.
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Old 09-03-2016, 09:58 AM   #58
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On more than a couple of locations, dockmaster's have placed me on a bulkhead in a space just large enough for my boat and in the middle of two other boats. Coming in at an angle just would not work very well. However being able to go completely sideways into the space is a big boon in such a situation.

Gordon
The thruster is nice for that no doubt about it. And nice to have in general.

But a spring line would still get you in.

And honestly with twins you wouldn't even really need the spring unless the current or wind were not in your favor.

Truth is people have been getting in and out of those kinds of situations long before thrusters were common on boats much below 80'-100'.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:04 AM   #59
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Gordon - Agree. Had it happen a few times at a crowded fuel pier. Pull up parallel and shuffle sideways. Works like a dream.
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Old 09-03-2016, 10:47 AM   #60
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The thruster is nice for that no doubt about it. And nice to have in general.



But a spring line would still get you in.



And honestly with twins you wouldn't even really need the spring unless the current or wind were not in your favor.



Truth is people have been getting in and out of those kinds of situations long before thrusters were common on boats much below 80'-100'.

Springs are great. However, it is a very rare event that there is any assistance when docking. Getting a spring on the cleat or around the bull rail when coming into a dock is extremely difficult and unsafe when short handed and all but impossible when single handing. So while I agree that spring lines are a useful tool, I just don't understand your insistence that spring lines will do the same job.
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