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Old 10-20-2015, 10:27 PM   #21
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Indeed. Removing guards might mean in future you`ll need a hand to do anything in the ER, or out of it.
There are substantial penalties in the workplace for operating machines without guards over moving parts. A factory floor is normally level and static, a boat ER is often anything but. If the engine mfr fitted guards, keep them in place.
And if they are not present for any reason then add them.

I became much more safety conscious when working in an organization that placed a high importance on it, in an industry where injuries and even fatalities are all too frequent. There is no reason to treat your home or boat any different to a workplace in regard to safety either, indeed do it for family and guest's sake even if you don't care about your own chance of injury.
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Old 10-20-2015, 10:33 PM   #22
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Indeed. Removing guards might mean in future you`ll need a hand to do anything in the ER, or out of it.
There are substantial penalties in the workplace for operating machines without guards over moving parts. A factory floor is normally level and static, a boat ER is often anything but. If the engine mfr fitted guards, keep them in place.


It baffles me how in this day and age folks recommend throwing away safety equipment

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Old 10-21-2015, 01:54 AM   #23
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My twin Perkins don't have belt guards and never did. Does that make them unsafe?
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Old 10-21-2015, 01:58 AM   #24
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My twin Perkins don't have belt guards and never did. Does that make them unsafe?
Nor does my relatively new VolvoPenta or any of the vehicles in my driveway.

Of course normal operation is with the engine hatch or hood down.

A walk in or crawl in engine room should have them, but if accessed through a hatch; probably not.
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Old 10-21-2015, 02:10 AM   #25
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My twin Perkins don't have belt guards and never did. Does that make them unsafe?
Neither do my Lehmans, but if they did, they would not be removed except for servicing. A belt broke while the mechanic was running the engine at WOT, taking out the front FW hose. Keep valued body parts well clear.
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Old 10-21-2015, 04:14 AM   #26
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If guards were never there you just need to assess whether there is any chance of body parts or clothing getting near any rotating/revolving mechanical things. And don't forget to allow for a a wave upsetting your balance, forcing you to grab something quickly. Assess the risk and then do whatever mitigates it to the extent you are comfortable with.

I grew up on a farm, a long time ago, and guards of any kind were a rarity on a wide range of equipment we and others used. My father made sure all of us knew the risks and were very careful. As were most folks, but incidents did occur regularly in the district. These days farm machinery and farmers are very safety aware, and there are plenty of legal requirements, like most workplaces. Times change, people learn from mistakes, norms evolve. At least make an assessment of your own situation rather than assuming that it is OK because it has always been like that.
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Old 10-21-2015, 06:39 AM   #27
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Wish John Deere had designed a better guard for my engine. It's impressive until you want to run an accessory like a second alternator off the crank shaft. Between the coolant pipe that runs down around the bottom of the engine and the attachment points for the guard, there was no way it could stay. Thankfully they offered a different coolant pipe for another application.

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The platform that you stand on while doing an engine check is on the side and ends before you get near the front of the engine.

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Old 10-21-2015, 09:23 AM   #28
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I did all my own maintenance and always reinstalled the guards. I like the idea of making them more visible. Not only do they protect me when working they also protect the engines in the case of something flying around in the ER in rough weather.
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Old 10-21-2015, 10:38 AM   #29
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I did all my own maintenance and always reinstalled the guards. I like the idea of making them more visible. Not only do they protect me when working they also protect the engines in the case of something flying around in the ER in rough weather.
Do you mean to tell me that there may be some unsecured items in an ER???

That unsecured something also includes the human going in for the team to make the repair/inspection. In my younger years I was that someone as I did not get seasick while bouncing around between hot turbo shrouds with hands covered in diesel while changing out a Racor element. It would be easy enough to fab a shroud with a face of expanded metal grate that is secured separately by 4 or 5 small bolts with captive nuts on the body of the shroud. Would give access to belts/pumps within 1 minute with a zip gun or speed wrench. I like my appendages (and still need them for my occupation) so I am thankful for shrouds. Now, Baker, on the other hand (pun intended) may not need his as commercial aircraft will all be remotely piloted in a year or so.
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Old 10-21-2015, 12:44 PM   #30
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Wow I was just thinking about this...
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Old 10-21-2015, 01:09 PM   #31
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I was thinking about removing my guards altogether. I have 3208s and as it sits now it would take me at least an hour to remove one. So what happens if you blow a belt and need to change it quickly. Not going to happen here. The port side being the most difficult as the HWH hoses hook up to this engine. I know when I changed the alternator I cussed the guard, but was able to install the alternator without removing the guard.


I do do engine checks on long cruises and there are time I go between the engines to check the shaft seals. If I remove the guard then there will no longer be any access between the engines while running. With the guards it is also difficult to see the belts and their condition.

Still contemplating it.....Good subject matter.
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Old 10-21-2015, 01:15 PM   #32
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Not all safety features are well engineered or installed for the right reasons.

A full belt guard may not be required to safely keep fingers or clothes out of it if a person physically would never reach around into the danger area...they may be for protecting other items from belt flogging as much as any reason.

While guards do have their place...re-engineered ones or easily removed/replaced ones might be an agenda item.

To say one way or the other about the value of a belt guard without a specific situation/application is like any safety application...generally a folly for some applications and highly valued for others..
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Old 10-21-2015, 01:55 PM   #33
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Down at the boat looking at mine now. I suppose I could put an expanded metal screen across the hatch beams running 6" aft of the forward bulkhead.
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Old 10-21-2015, 04:05 PM   #34
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Whether you keep the guards or not should depend on how the engine room is laid out. If like my boat it would be easy to tangle with spinning things, then KEEP THEM.

On some boats the ER is not intended to be occupied while running, and engines up close to fwd bkhd, really no chance for accidental contact.

I have run into a couple boats where engines were installed with belt guards on, and engines were so close to bkhd that YOU COULD NOT TAKE THEM OFF. Choice words spoken then. Had to remove them with a sawzall. Really.
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Old 10-21-2015, 04:10 PM   #35
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So what happens if you blow a belt and need to change it quickly. Not going to happen here.
If you want the guards but want an easy access see my above post. You can modify them to where the screen comes off the front with 4 or 5 easily accessed bolts (the nuts would be captive on the solid shroud that supports the screen) and you could likely change a belt with that outer perimeter shroud in place.
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Old 10-21-2015, 06:54 PM   #36
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It was said, regarding the guarding of moving parts on industrial machines, the only truly compliant machines were those so well guarded they could not be used at all. Breach of statutory duty to maintain fencing gave injured employees an automatic entitlement(now theoretically modified) to compensation for injury sustained as a result. (Even if the injured employee had removed the guard,which even raised more issues like "failure to supervise", as well.)
Clearly there has to be a balance between access to parts when necessary, and guarding them to prevent injury.
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Old 10-21-2015, 07:04 PM   #37
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Guards are typically in place as much for containment as keeping foreign objects away from rotating parts. Leaving belt guards off is a shortcut that can bite you in the arse by way of damages to other parts by the blown belt. Some engine rooms have more crap stored than they should and the majority of it is unsecured. Safety is never an absolute but why increase your risk?

Ultimately you are responsible for your own safety but personally I've always felt that if belt guards are a nuisance for you checking fire extinguishers and such likely is too.
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Old 10-21-2015, 08:40 PM   #38
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It was said, regarding the guarding of moving parts on industrial machines, the only truly compliant machines were those so well guarded they could not be used at all. Breach of statutory duty to maintain fencing gave injured employees an automatic entitlement(now theoretically modified) to compensation for injury sustained as a result. (Even if the injured employee had removed the guard,which even raised more issues like "failure to supervise", as well.)
Clearly there has to be a balance between access to parts when necessary, and guarding them to prevent injury.
Safety/security is inversely proportional to useability!!!
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Old 10-21-2015, 08:40 PM   #39
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My belts aren't "in your face" but instead closely facing a bulkhead. See no reason for a guard; don't have one. Who in their right mind would go out of their way to expose their extremities to running belts anyway?

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Old 10-21-2015, 08:48 PM   #40
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My engines are so close to the forward bulkhead. I would have to remove the guards every time I want to open or close the fuel tank sight gage valves, change the Racor elements, change the oil cooler zincs, or change the raw water impellers.
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