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Old 06-04-2018, 07:38 AM   #1
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What is the difference between Standing on and Giving way?

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ID:	77054Although this didn’t happen to me, I have had such close encounters. Overtaking in a narrow channel, When at last minute the little guy goes from the port side across my bow to the stbd side. Note the bridge abutment. This was Sunday the 3rd. Poughkeepsie mid Hudson bridge.

If you think this is OK, Zoom in to really see what the issue is.
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Old 06-04-2018, 08:57 AM   #2
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This is where this happened. Plenty of water EVERYWHERE for a small vessel to go. Click image for larger version

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Sam. If you are on here. Please explain. If only so I can understand what the thinking is to make sure I can avoid an incident like this in the future.
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:13 AM   #3
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Similar issues here. People fish near a bridge, hidden behind the structure and suddenly spurt across the channel while someone is passing under,
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:33 AM   #4
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I appreciate that you specifically avoid using the term 'right of way', because that phrasing was specifically stripped from the language on purpose decades ago.

The intention is to easily negotiate a passing and avoid a collision with limited communication. Everyone has encountered a pedestrian in a narrow space. You step left to avoid them, but they step right. Now you both in front of each other again. So you step right, just as they step left. Oops, you both laugh and someone makes a corny joke about 'dancing'. That negotition is tougher on the water.

The idea is that under specific conditions, one vessel is compelled to change course and one vessel is compelled to hold course. This avoids both boats turning from a collision course to a new collision course.

In this case, the 'Give-Way' vessel is actually the vessel in control of avoiding the collision. The give way vessel decides how the pass is going to occur.

This is where Rule #8 comes in. If you are the stand-on vessel and the 'give-way' vessel chooses to take no action, then you as the stand-on vessel are compelled to take action to avoid the collision.

The example you give brings in another set of rules. Very large commercial vessels are constrained by size, draft, and navigation. The large vessel couldn't possible navigate to avoid a collision. They can't in most cases because it would take them too long to change course or stop. Therefore, in your picture, the large vessel is the stand-on vessel and the small vessel is an simply an idiot.
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:53 AM   #5
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The example you give brings in another set of rules. Very large commercial vessels are constrained by size, draft, and navigation. The large vessel couldn't possible navigate to avoid a collision. They can't in most cases because it would take them too long to change course or stop. Therefore, in your picture, the large vessel is the stand-on vessel and the small vessel is an simply an idiot.
The tug pushing the barge went full astern. By the time the engines were going full astern he grabbed his phone and took a pic. Hoping that he would start to ‘see’ the trawler again. It was ONLY by the actions of the stand on vessel that collision was avoided. I wish he had taken a before and after pic showing the guy starting out on the port bow, then as approaching the bridge the guy went directly across the bow, disappeared from sight for a few seconds. Then reappeared as the tug and barge lost speed and changed the relative vector between the two.

From my experience the small boats do not even realize they almost died!

From a practical perspective: The river is approximately 2700’ wide here. There is good water the entire channel width for small boats. The actual channel is about 450’ in the center span. The barge is around 75’ wide. How difficult is it to understand out of a 2700’ wide area that avoiding about a 75’ wide spot (in front of a large commercial vessel) is key to your survival? For that matter. Keeping a lookout wherever you are and ensuring that you keep apprised of whatever is around you to keep out of the direct front line of fire (so to speak).
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Old 06-04-2018, 10:06 AM   #6
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In my opinion ( and it’s worth what you pay for it!). If you are seeing a large vessel at this aspect everything’s fine. Click image for larger version

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If you see a large vessel at this aspect pay attention. Click image for larger version

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If you see a large commercial vessel at this aspect you had better be either paying constant attention to changes in aspect, OR taking time to maneuver to change this aspect. Click image for larger version

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Just FYI. If you see a large commercial vessel this close, at this or a finer aspect the vessel has (for all practical means) already done all they can do to avoid collision. The rest is up to you.
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Old 06-04-2018, 10:12 AM   #7
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Attachment 77054Although this didn’t happen to me, I have had such close encounters. Overtaking in a narrow channel, When at last minute the little guy goes from the port side across my bow to the stbd side. Note the bridge abutment. This was Sunday the 3rd. Poughkeepsie mid Hudson bridge.

If you think this is OK, Zoom in to really see what the issue is.
Any radio contact? If not, I wonder if he even knew the barge was there. Looks like a pilothouse boat. Lots of folks out there driving from the PH with no clue what's behind them due to boat/window design. I love a flybridge.
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Old 06-04-2018, 10:20 AM   #8
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This is where this happened. Plenty of water EVERYWHERE for a small vessel to go. Attachment 77055

Sam. If you are on here. Please explain. If only so I can understand what the thinking is to make sure I can avoid an incident like this in the future.
Who is Sam?
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Old 06-04-2018, 10:53 AM   #9
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Who is Sam?


The Captain told me the name of the trawler was “Sam”. Not sure it was the dinghy name or trawler.
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Old 06-04-2018, 11:26 AM   #10
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Hope you gave him 5 short for nothing else than to need to change underwear for being stupid.
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Old 06-04-2018, 11:44 AM   #11
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The tug pushing the barge went full astern.
This is where rule 8 comes in. The commercial vessel is still compelled to attempt to avoid the collision even though they are the stand-on vessel. He was doing his due diligence even though he had little options and the actions he took might take for longer than he has to avoid the collision. His options were limited because he shouldn't be forced to place his own vessel or crew at risk in an attempt to avoid the collision. So he's not going to steer into the shore but will attempt a full reverse to slow or stop.

The difference is during an investigation, it would come to light that the stand-on vessel attempted to take action, regardless of how potentially futile those actions might be.
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Old 06-04-2018, 01:18 PM   #12
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The reason I posted this event is not to cry over the rules, or place blame. It is to try to understand how someone acts, doesn’t care about their surroundings and/or what can happen due to inattention and careless mistakes. I’m sure others would like to hear what was happening from the other perspective. Was there some ‘reason’. Was there some rationale for cutting across the channel?

From my 38 years experience operating tugs and tows all along the East and Gulf coasts I have seen this same ‘Nautical Squirrel’ maneuver. I have been yelled at: ‘Didn’t you see me? I’m a sailing vessel. I’m this. I’m that’. But the upshot is.... my barge is only approximately 60 to 80’ wide. How can anyone NOT stay out of danger by NOT being within that frontal area? It appears some cannot ascertain risk of collision or whether they are even IN a dangerous situation. Or how to get OUT of a dangerous situation. It’s not just ‘a Lookout’. Or who’s right and who’s wrong.

It’s about simply staying alive. It doesn’t get much more simple than that.
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Old 06-04-2018, 01:21 PM   #13
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I am thinking a lot of rule 2 also.....the trawler wasnt acting like a prudent seaman on several levels.

Rule 9 might dictate who really is the stand on/give way..... to me looks like the tug/barge are stand on even if overtaking.

Dont know if that stretch of water has "special rules"....

And yes cappy, being on the bottom rung of the towing ladder, I can still appreciate your point the some boaters seem to have a low survival instinct. I have talked to crusty tug/tow operators who basically shrug and dont seem to care when this happens thinking if something goes wrong....so be it...and others who are a nervous wreck around rec boaters.

Two extremes for sure...... but still understandable.
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Old 06-04-2018, 01:33 PM   #14
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Colregs are WAY to complicated for the average yachter to fully comprehend.
There’s too many what if’s, and not mes in colregs. Personal mis interpretation galore. Read just as far as they need justification. Then close the book.
‘Sailboats always have the right of way’ sound familiar? I heard that SO many times from the yacht club crowd I could puke.
‘Can’t you see me? I’m a 26’ searay!’ My boat is SO big.....

I don’t mind sharing the waterway. Heck, it’s a bright spot seeing who and what’s out and around. But the ignorance..... uggh.
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Old 06-04-2018, 02:19 PM   #15
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I get the same thing all the time from bicyclists on the highway!
They may have the “right” to be there, but that won’t be much consolation when they’re dead...
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Old 06-04-2018, 02:25 PM   #16
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I think Fryedaze is likely correct. Then boater made the move without looking behind. Similar to a car changing lanes without checking over their shoulder for traffic. I’ve done this a couple times. No excuse and after those two times (nothing as egregious as this case) I make sure to be diligent about making sure I am clear astern before making any course change.
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Old 06-04-2018, 03:36 PM   #17
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The reason I posted this event is not to cry over the rules, or place blame. It is to try to understand how someone acts, doesn’t care about their surroundings and/or what can happen due to inattention and careless mistakes. I’m sure others would like to hear what was happening from the other perspective. Was there some ‘reason’. Was there some rationale for cutting across the channel?

From my 38 years experience operating tugs and tows all along the East and Gulf coasts I have seen this same ‘Nautical Squirrel’ maneuver. I have been yelled at: ‘Didn’t you see me? I’m a sailing vessel. I’m this. I’m that’. But the upshot is.... my barge is only approximately 60 to 80’ wide. How can anyone NOT stay out of danger by NOT being within that frontal area? It appears some cannot ascertain risk of collision or whether they are even IN a dangerous situation. Or how to get OUT of a dangerous situation. It’s not just ‘a Lookout’. Or who’s right and who’s wrong.

It’s about simply staying alive. It doesn’t get much more simple than that.
I didn't take it as complaining. Apologies, I wouldn't have 'lectured' if I knew your credentials, as you could clearly school us the majority of things we didn't even know we didn't know.

I wouldn't bother scratching my head too hard. We like to joke about folks who behave in such a way "He's either an idiot for being oblivious or an A-hole for being aware and disregarding anyway". (The admiral and will jokingly wonder "Look at this guy, I wonder if he's an idiot or an A-hole".
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Old 06-04-2018, 08:31 PM   #18
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Shrew already made this point earlier but it’s importance is often missed. When two boats collide it’s rarley just a case of right away. Both boats are always obligated to avoid the collision. The stand on vessel must still prove that it made Every reasonable effort to avoid the collision or it will be assigned a portion of the blame.

We have a very interesting case here in the Puget Sound between a State Ferry that was the give way vessel and had room to maneuver vs a trawler that was the stand on vessel on a long established course but operator was not at the helm. The interesting part will be how much blame is assigned to each boat.
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:06 PM   #19
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Shrew already made this point earlier but it’s importance is often missed. When two boats collide it’s rarley just a case of right away. Both boats are always obligated to avoid the collision. The stand on vessel must still prove that it made Every reasonable effort to avoid the collision or it will be assigned a portion of the blame.

We have a very interesting case here in the Puget Sound between a State Ferry that was the give way vessel and had room to maneuver vs a trawler that was the stand on vessel on a long established course but operator was not at the helm. The interesting part will be how much blame is assigned to each boat.


Here is a news article on the final determination. I only spotted one error in the article, which isn’t bad.

https://www.kitsapsun.com/story/news...boat/98497218/
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Old 06-04-2018, 09:27 PM   #20
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It’s ok when no one is hurt. It matters when people kill themselves (or others) because of stupidity.

Think if the Naptyme owner had been killed. Down below, in the head. In a harbor. On autopilot. They make a special thing for that situation. It’s called neutral.
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