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Old 08-23-2015, 10:18 AM   #1
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City: Ivoryton, CT
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Refloat after Grounding

I was reading some great posts and one discussion included running gear protection and segued into a 42' GB aground that went on its side when the tide went out, and when the tide came back in, instead of righting itself, the boat took water and was declared a loss.

We're looking at purchasing a Europa and I always like to have a plan for "worst case" scenarios. If this were to happen, what steps should be taken (or are there any) to prevent this?
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Old 08-23-2015, 11:26 AM   #2
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Every grounding is different, every haul is different, and every tide is different. I'm also one of the people that will say I have never grounded any of the boats I have owned more than a couple times each.

The trawlers I have had will sit pretty well on a good sand base. Once I have grounded I drop my anchor and use it to turn parallel to the incoming tide. If there is time before the next incoming tide put out an anchors at 10:30 and 1:30 as far out as possible; you can use these to steer your boat a little bit. If short on time put out one anchor sightly into the next incoming tide.

I feel the key is to let the waves hit you right into the bow or stern.
I also try to use my anchor to hold me still or pull me out and then use my prop once I know Im not just going to dig a hole with it.

I also carry a set of lift pillows and the straps needed for them. It is more important in a boat that rolls if it gets grounded and the water goes out; you might need the extra flotation as you roll back upright. You can also use them to keep from rolling over as far.


I don't think I said that every situation was different. It is best to call a tow / salvage company for help and it's much cheaper than a life or total loss.
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Old 08-23-2015, 11:32 AM   #3
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Some bilge pump discharges do not have much rise in the hose before going overboard. Take a big heel as tide goes out and they can backflow.
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Old 08-23-2015, 12:16 PM   #4
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Could you tell me more about lift pillows and how they're used?
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Old 08-23-2015, 01:19 PM   #5
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Lift pillows can be used for the boat to roll on to as the water level goes down. This can help keep the edge of the boat higher above the water line or keep the waves from breaking on your deck as the water level goes back up.

One time I ended up at about 75* from the incoming tide. I set an anchor off my stern and an anchor off my bow. I know it would be a bit dicey till I got my bow pointed into the waves. I rigged the bags up about center of haul and as low as possible in case I rolled a little bit.

Ski in NC has a great point about the discharges on bilge pumps.

The set I have are rated for 2,000 lbs each. I know Im never going to be able to lift my boat, but feel they do help more with something to roll on to.
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