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Old 12-08-2016, 10:15 AM   #1
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Nordig Tug 37 stability

Do you think in some known Nordig tugs 37/39 GZ-curves and others stability the facts about this boat.

I would like to know how much is too much for this type of boat?

I have found it to be very sea keaping rough weather, but it would be nice to know how much it takes.

Boat is CE-certifications B Which means max 18 bofor wind and The average value of waves 4 meters(13feet) bigest wave can be 8 meters(26 feet)
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Old 12-08-2016, 10:30 AM   #2
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Here's a little info about the process for getting the CE rating: http://www.glantoa.net/nordic_tugs_stability.pdf

Perhaps the factory can supply more complete information? Have you contacted them?
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Old 12-08-2016, 10:31 AM   #3
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Two things:

One, go to Nordic Tug directly for the stability data you are requesting. Remembering of course that bad weather avoidance is a good idea.

Second, that heavy dinghy does not help stability. At least park the outboard lower in the vessel.
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Old 12-08-2016, 11:55 AM   #4
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Here's a little info about the process for getting the CE rating: http://www.glantoa.net/nordic_tugs_stability.pdf

Perhaps the factory can supply more complete information? Have you contacted them?
Be aware that no one checks this stuff, the manufacturer does self certification.
After about 4000 surveys and 300 deliveries of powerboats I lean towards the skeptical side regarding advertising bluster and builder spec's.
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Old 12-08-2016, 12:01 PM   #5
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Two things:

One, go to Nordic Tug directly for the stability data you are requesting. Remembering of course that bad weather avoidance is a good idea.

Second, that heavy dinghy does not help stability. At least park the outboard lower in the vessel.
Maybe .... sometimes weight added high will slow the roll but this is something to be discussed with an NA.
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Old 12-08-2016, 01:15 PM   #6
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The Nordic Tug 37 will have positive stability up to at least 55-60 degrees heel. That has proven more than adequate for almost all normal pleasure use. Something has to go very wrong (interior flooding or bar crossing for instance) to get this type of boat upside down.

Part of the reason for the Cat B rating rather than Cat A is downflooding angle. The bottom edge of the back door and engine room vents in the topsides are the culprits. Move those engine room vents up and increase doorsill height, and you could come closer to getting an Cat A (Open Ocean) rating. There are other factors, wind heeling and angle of ultimate righting arm are big ones that require precise data which I don't have.
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Old 12-09-2016, 12:32 AM   #7
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Thanks for all the replies, the link stabilty was interesting, but a little circular text. I contact the manufacturer if you would give the exact facts, I have other matters to them.


Good attention was Themes Changes the owner of the boat, such as a dinky on the roof. I understand the change in the stability of this effect, but its effect may decrease if there is an original Stability information.


Of course this is only theoretical knowledge in terms of stability and the best thing to do to be away from the sea, when there is bad weather. The wave height is not the only factor, the waveform period and direction and also represent a lot. Here, in the Baltic Sea wave is almost always quite sharp and the wave period in relation to the height of a short, in addition to the wave direction is often.


I think these ship stabili information would be available to everyone all of the boats when we're buying a new boat. They could really compare boats and forget about the beautiful pitches and image manipulation features of the vessel at sea.


If something of interest, or is not familiar with the ship stabili things, in this simplified case. link pages, please. Thanks s/y Troldand
From Scandinavian Waters to the Med - Stability
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Old 12-09-2016, 12:43 AM   #8
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I guess buoyancy might be a little compromised due to the large amount of fresh water influence in the Baltic. Less of an issue in small boats I imagine. Surely not enough to worry about.
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Old 12-09-2016, 01:32 AM   #9
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What's going on here?



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Old 12-09-2016, 01:34 AM   #10
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You're right, the density of water affected by the heat and salinity. At the Baltic Sea salinity varies slightly see the picture and is actually much less salt than the ocean. ships swam deeper here if upouma is constant.


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Old 12-09-2016, 02:43 AM   #11
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What is it you'd do with that information once the builder supplied it? It would be a standard boat or specific one, checked sometime or never actually checked and wouldn't tell you about another specific boat. It might be useful if you had the same data for many boats and could compare, but there are so many other factors. For instance one boat could take a very linear curve to instability and another might just reach a point it goes from fine to over without any graduation. How much fuel and water, even which tanks. How much loose cargo, including people. Then more likely to lead to disaster is the structure including windows, the likelihood of taking water on. Stability at what speed, what size and type waves. Every boat has many factors related to it's stability. Ultimately you hope to never find out the limit. Probably a more important question is what are the maximum conditions you'd feel comfortable boating in with one and the maximum that you would feel safe in.

Just curious as to how you would think you could use the information.
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Old 12-09-2016, 07:01 AM   #12
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CE-sertification it is a strict law in Europe and the manufacturer is responsible for ensuring legally.


I therefore trust that the ship will take forse 8 waves of on average 13 feet up to 26 feet, all full tanks, max 10 people on board and baggage 1360kg.


subsequently moving the start of the stability over such accessories course change but can be calculated mathematically how, for example at the height affects the weight, for example, GZ curve.


The CE mark boat rules are quite simple and always the same, it was a boat or a sailboat or hinged for another vessel, the comparison is easy to rough level. CE A, B, C or D immediately tells us something vessel where it can move and what kind of weather. If the interest and the link to the CE mark, the boats and what they contain.


http://www.google.fi/url?sa=t&rct=j&...41320020,d.bGg








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Old 12-09-2016, 07:26 AM   #13
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Having worked in and around EU laws and regs, it would appear they have not yet figured out how to legislate common sense.

Quite simply, your NT 37 is a coastal cruiser. Do not take it out in big waves and strong winds. Especially 8 meter seas and 50 knots!
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Old 12-09-2016, 07:28 AM   #14
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I guess buoyancy might be a little compromised due to the large amount of fresh water influence in the Baltic. Less of an issue in small boats I imagine. Surely not enough to worry about.
Plimsomin sign on the side of the ship, mark well the importance of salinity and temperatures buoyancy.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waterline
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Old 12-09-2016, 07:33 AM   #15
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Having worked in and around EU laws and regs, it would appear they have not yet figured out how to legislate common sense.

Quite simply, your NT 37 is a coastal cruiser. Do not take it out in big waves and strong winds. Especially 8 meter seas and 50 knots!

Then I really hope to be somewhere else, as the saying mass at sea, whether the CE mark its Place.
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Old 12-09-2016, 07:39 AM   #16
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Having worked in and around EU laws and regs, it would appear they have not yet figured out how to legislate common sense.

Quite simply, your NT 37 is a coastal cruiser. Do not take it out in big waves and strong winds. Especially 8 meter seas and 50 knots!
These are the same standards that permit brass seacocks/throughulls with mis-matched threads and side loading propane lockers (without overboard drains) that open over non-ignition protected engine room hatches.
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Old 12-09-2016, 08:11 AM   #17
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These are the same standards that permit brass seacocks/throughulls with mis-matched threads and side loading propane lockers (without overboard drains) that open over non-ignition protected engine room hatches.
Whot is this boat model and what ages, CE-certified Venessa gas cabinet was not aired? below what you need to be!

5.5 Gas supply equipment

Gas systems for domestic use shall be of the vapor-withdrawal type and shall be designed and installed in such a way as to avoid leaks and the risk of explosion and be capable of being tested for leaks. Materials and equipment must be suitable for the specific gas used and designed to withstand the marine environment, the stresses and exposures.

Each unit is equipped with a working flame failure device on all burners. In each gas device must have separate gas distribution system, and each unit is equipped with a separate closing device. Adequate ventilation must be ensured for leaks and products of combustion.

All craft with a permanently installed gas system shall be fitted with an enclosure to contain all gas cylinders. Enclosure shall be separated from the living quarters, so that there is only access to the outside, and that it is ventilated to the outside so that any escaping gas drains overboard. Any permanent gas system shall be tested after installation.
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Old 12-09-2016, 08:41 AM   #18
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Interesting that the max load converts to only about 3,000 lbs. I dont think it hard to add that much weight in cruising gear and supplies.
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Old 12-09-2016, 11:46 AM   #19
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CE-sertification it is a strict law in Europe and the manufacturer is responsible for ensuring legally.


I therefore trust that the ship will take forse 8 waves of on average 13 feet up to 26 feet, all full tanks, max 10 people on board and baggage 1360kg.


subsequently moving the start of the stability over such accessories course change but can be calculated mathematically how, for example at the height affects the weight, for example, GZ curve.


The CE mark boat rules are quite simple and always the same, it was a boat or a sailboat or hinged for another vessel, the comparison is easy to rough level. CE A, B, C or D immediately tells us something vessel where it can move and what kind of weather. If the interest and the link to the CE mark, the boats and what they contain.

You're using and abusing the entire concept of CE as if it's some guarantee of safety in those conditions. It isn't and the safety in the conditions you describe is very dependent on the captain and crew and on the maintenance of the boat.

To me, CE B is a coastal cruiser. Now that is plain and simple in my mind. Will the boat perhaps survive conditions up to 40 knot winds and 13' seas? Yes, but that is worse case and that is thinking of heading out in 20 knot winds and 4 foot seas and things turn ugly on the way, you fight for your life against the seas, you survive, the boat holds up with only a few thousand dollars damage, your guests never get on a boat again after the experience.

I think of CE A as a minimum standard for ocean crossing and cruising. That's not saying under ideal conditions I wouldn't take a CE B boat to the Bahamas or even to the Caribbean, but it would have to be ideal conditions. The things Tad pointed out are minor but could also sink you.

The terminology used for the CE's says a lot. CE B is offshore. That is outside runs and short crossings. CE A is Ocean, longer runs and crossings. CE C is Inshore.

CE B fits the intended use of the Nordic Tug in question well. It's not designed or intended as an ocean passagemaker.

I still am missing your entire point. What is it you're trying to know or prove or find out? Or what are you trying to convince yourself of?
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Old 12-10-2016, 09:00 AM   #20
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first of all I apologize for the bad language skills and potential misunderstanding.


here is one example of where you can take advantage of the Stability facts. Thanks to a friend of the forum "retriever" by sending the link. Knowledge is unfortunately NT32, the severity of the leak angle of the ship is fully loaded with 40 and 45 less heavily laden. I have always been equipped with all the boats, the tilt angle indicator, due to previous history of sailing. The angle information can take advantage of changing course if the ship begins to tilt in the waves close up critical angles . Often, how the ship will not tilt angles critical views even close, but sometimes it is possible. I also have life jackets, I have not ever had to them, if you understand, yet they are reserved for all passengers


http://www.glantoa.net/nordic_tugs_stability.pdf
The results were better than we expected. The boats were indeed well designed. We were nervous that we would have to modify or move scuppers, drains, air intakes or any number of things. The only thing we were required to do was to increase the height of the engine air intake “snorkel” or baffle that extends upward to prevent sea water from entering through the opening. We had to increase its height by ” and angle it inboard ” (see photos above). The reason for this was the down-flooding point was just barely too low when the boat is heeled over at the maximum calculated angle. That angle is slightly different on each boat but the 32, for example, has a critical down-flooding point of 45.5 degrees when light and 40 degrees when loaded. Aside from passing category “B” and


it would have been good if you had looked at my mail with a link to an earlier regarding CE, as you understand, we think that for the most part as well.


I dot go never Ocean, The Baltic Sea is just "offshore" term, at worst, CE. The largest wave has been average of 8.2 meters of 27 feet and a single wave of 14 meters 46.6 feet. Most waves are 3-6 feet and fortunately the archipelago only 0-4 feet.


the diagram you can see B / A category boat to the minimum angle which it must withstand capsize. This tells me roughly, that the boat will take more than I or the minimum 95


I do not see that such factual information is at least no disadvantage?


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