Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-06-2018, 07:02 AM   #1
Veteran Member
 
woodscrew's Avatar
 
City: Barnegat Light
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Northern Star
Vessel Model: Bristol 42 1970
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 43
medical emergency call?

In the event of a medical emergency along the ICW that can't be handled on board, what's the procedure? Who and how do you call? VHF, cell phone, Coast Guard etc? I have AIS with an emergency switch setup. Use that? Help.
__________________
Advertisement

woodscrew is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 07:21 AM   #2
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 17,994
911 would be best and make sure to coordinate an exact landside pickup point ASAP...even if you have to pull over to private property....the EMTs will.

Then a call to the USCG advising them which 911 dispatch you coordinated with.

There isn't as much coordination between agencies as on might think...but the 911 system has been the best focal point in my experience...and even that can be shakey when you are on the water and only yards from docks because of "territorial" or jurisdictional boundries.

Can't get cell coverage?.... USCG.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 07:35 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Roger Long's Avatar
 
City: Albany, NY
Country: Albany
Vessel Name: Gypsy Star
Vessel Model: Gulf Star 43
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 266
You may not even need to call. Crew was immobilized by sudden and severe back pain just after getting up at the southern end of the Pongo Canal. I called the marina in Belhaven to arrange for a dock and we started heading there. USCG heard the radio call. Half way to the marina, they came along side and put an EMT aboard without my even needing to slow down. They put in an IV in and monitored her for shock until we landed. Ambulance ride to Washington NC was $10,000 (yup,four zeros) so be sure you have medical insurance that doesn't have any network restrictions. We pay plenty extra for that but it's necessary when you travel.
__________________
Roger and Patsy
"Gypsy Star" Where are we?
https://share.findmespot.com/shared/...BunICxVztYVRlg
Roger Long is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 07:38 AM   #4
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 17,994
Obviously the situation dictates the type of call...just like it would on land...

But a true life threatening situation where minutes count....I would start at the apex of the emergency response system.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 08:08 AM   #5
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 6,075
In all my years of running charters, I've only had one medical emergency on the boat that required an EMT. Contacted USCG, who coordinated everything. One of the advantages of having the USCG involved was having the additional manpower to remove the large patient on a stretcher from the boat. Something most of us probably don't consider when boat shopping, is how difficult it would be to tranfer an incapacitated person on a stretcher from one boat to possibly another, away from a dock. In my situation, was very happy that I was in my boat slip.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 08:23 AM   #6
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 17,994
One thing about the ICW........

There usually are hundreds and hundreds of EMT crews along the way and some are usually within minutes of any place you are. The USCG could be an hour or more away. ...or on another call.

If offshore or any large boady of water where you are an hour or more away from making landfall...sure.... the USCG is probably the best to coordinate...plus again cell phone coverage may be non existent or spotty.

I am not saying dont contact the USCG every time...just for me being involved in literally hundreds of MEDEVACs fron coordinator to pilot to boat captain..... I would bet my life on calling 911 first in the majority of the ICW or Great Loop.... thus kerping in mind that requirement as you cruise along as there is always exceptions.

Whether you call one or the other first may not matter as much as calling both to get everything rolling whether they are coordinating yet or not.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 08:48 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 420
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
One thing about the ICW........

There usually are hundreds and hundreds of EMT crews along the way and some are usually within minutes of any place you are. The USCG could be an hour or more away. ...or on another call.

If offshore or any large boady of water where you are an hour or more away from making landfall...sure.... the USCG is probably the best to coordinate...plus again cell phone coverage may be non existent or spotty.

I am not saying dont contact the USCG every time...just for me being involved in literally hundreds of MEDEVACs fron coordinator to pilot to boat captain..... I would bet my life on calling 911 first in the majority of the ICW or Great Loop.... thus kerping in mind that requirement as you cruise along as there is always exceptions.

Whether you call one or the other first may not matter as much as calling both to get everything rolling whether they are coordinating yet or not.
This is a great discussion. Something that we never think of until the sh** hits the fan. Psneeld your experience and thoughts are appreciated!
Easting is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 08:52 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
City: Narragansett Bay
Country: New England
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 420
So as a part time charter boat captain, within a mile or so of shore, and I have an emergency, who is my first / second call to? 911?
Frankly until the discussion I would have thought CG but now when in a populated area I am thinking 911 first and CG second
Easting is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 09:28 AM   #9
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 17,994
Both within minutes of each other...even if you have to place each one on short holds.....never to interfere with boat handling safety.

If chartering ...may start with USCG first as they have "jurisdiction" over you in terms of a license.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 11:21 AM   #10
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 6,075
In my case, I was 10 miles offshore, there was a USCG station just inside the inlet and figured the USCG would know which entity to call (city or county EMS) and might have a preferred dock (one that had been used before) to evacuate the passenger.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 12:54 PM   #11
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 17,994
Wasn't second guessing you Ted...home dock and hometown experience can trump all.

I think if I could steer, hold the phone, and key the mike to the USCG at the same time...I would do it. May try it anyway if the emergency warrants it.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 03:37 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Sabre602's Avatar
 
City: NW Washington State
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kingfisher
Vessel Model: 37' converted gillnetter/crabber
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 295
I've had three experiences with life-threatening emergencies aboard, and they were handled three different ways...it really does depend upon where you are.

The first was a bee sting while sailing about five miles east of Sandy Hook, heading up into Lower Bay. The crew member had forgotten her EpiPen and she developed anaphylaxis. The Coast Guard helicopter got help to her far faster than we could have by heading toward shore to meet EMS. BTW, I always carry two doses of epinephrine on my boat these days....

The second was a diving injury off Alki Point in Seattle. The diver came up in distress, coughing up blood...he turned out to have a bilateral hemopneumothorax. We did advise the Coast Guard but were able to roar across Elliot Bay and meet the paramedics at the pier much faster than the helo could have gotten to us.

The third doesn't relate to US coastal waters...it was when I was a guide in the Galapagos Islands and one of my passengers had a heart attack. There was no 911, no USCG. We had to keep him aboard for a two day passage to rendezvous with a plane sent out by the Ecuadorian Air Force.

Overall, it's important to know the medical conditions of all passengers and to ensure that everyone has the medications they require.
__________________
Anson & Donna

Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. ~The Dalai Lama
Sabre602 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 05:12 PM   #13
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 15,229
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabre602 View Post

Overall, it's important to know the medical conditions of all passengers and to ensure that everyone has the medications they require.
I know some feel like this is a heavy intrusion but it may save their life.

I would call the CG if offshore and 911 on the ICW.

However, I'm going to remind what I consider the importance of a medical kit on board. Many of the most critical items would be in it. Also, it allows you to administer aid under the instruction of EMT's or even an ER while on the way to shore. Of course, any training you can get helps too.

Along the ICW if there wasn't a marina handy, I'd pull up to the first dock on the mainland side and get an ambulance on the way there.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2018, 05:21 PM   #14
Guru
 
City: Fairport
Country: United States
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,120
THat is a really good question, and the best answer depends on where you are in the AICW.

If you are in a well equipped COUNTY, AND not offshore, I advise you use them. They may be closer than the FEDS, but even that is not a given. If you are offshore, I know of no county helo's that have lift baskets.
I've rolled uscg, county, city, and even seen Customs and border protection boats with various situations I've been in.
If things are really critical, 911 AND ch 16/70 is my plan. Let them race it out with the best/closest assets. From what I see with first responders, they generally all like to be involved and see action.

Here is a story told to me by a first person involved. A small boat sank at night in seas right out of a FL inlet. Two passengers swam to opposite jetties and were OK, but unaware of their buddies status. One had the county respond and start a search for person B. The other had a different agency respond and start a search for person A. This went on for a while, until, ultimately, the two agencies discovered that person A and B were OK, just across the inlet from one another.
diver dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2018, 12:42 AM   #15
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 8,789
Would a pan pan call on 16 work? Potential responders could take it from there,with services you may not know even exist, perhaps combining the efforts of several providers.
Land based ambulance here are fixed on getting a cross streets location and don`t cope with "Refuge Bay on the Hawkesbury River". A call on 16 should produce a Water Police response(here,maybe CG in USA)and/or Marine Rescue (a kind of volunteer CG) response, thereby getting the ball rolling.
I had friends with a medical emergency anchored out, husband had a throat hemorrhage inside the head, door closed, and blocked by his collapsed body. Water Police attended, ferried the extracted patient to a dockside waiting ambulance,in a co-operative joint effort.
For Hawkesbury River cruisers,Dangar Island has a water ambulance and presumably crew with (at least) First Aid ability.
Apologies OP, for the transpacific crossing, but I`m sure other Aussies might be thinking local too, and our experiences may transpose elsewhere.
__________________
BruceK
Island Gypsy 36 Europa "Doriana"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2018, 09:11 PM   #16
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 7,128
Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
Would a pan pan call on 16 work? Potential responders could take it from there,with services you may not know even exist, perhaps combining the efforts of several providers.

When my Dad had a stroke at anchor in Telegraph harbor, my Mom did a Mayday call on 16. A sailboat anchored right next to them heard the Mayday and dinghies over to assist. An ER physician and ER nurse. They brought their emergency medical kit and checked my Dad out (not a lot they could do) and waited for the Canadian CG Auxillary to show up to transport him to shore and a hospital.

You never know who may hear the radio call and provide more help than you might otherwise expect.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2018, 12:23 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
Sabre602's Avatar
 
City: NW Washington State
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kingfisher
Vessel Model: 37' converted gillnetter/crabber
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 295
Quote:
Originally Posted by dhays View Post
When my Dad had a stroke at anchor in Telegraph harbor, my Mom did a Mayday call on 16. A sailboat anchored right next to them heard the Mayday and dinghies over to assist. An ER physician and ER nurse. They brought their emergency medical kit and checked my Dad out (not a lot they could do) and waited for the Canadian CG Auxillary to show up to transport him to shore and a hospital.

You never know why may hear the radio call and provide more help than you might otherwise expect.
There's a lot to this. Plenty of physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals that I work with are out and about on their boats all the time. I myself am a critical care & trauma nurse and carry a kit wherever I go.
__________________
Anson & Donna

Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible. ~The Dalai Lama
Sabre602 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2018, 06:50 AM   #18
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 17,994
The OP asked who to call along the ICW.

Even then several things come into play...first and foremost, what is the nature of the emergency...are minutes really going to matter?

Sure a Mayday call will work..... tho technically a medical emergency is not a Mayday...but even in my line of work I say BS...make it a Mayday. I do really want to emphasize that Mayday is absolutely fine for a life threatening emergency and even lesser issues if you think appropriate.... equate it to calling an ambulance on land...that severity... make the call a MAYDAY.

The Mayday will also most likely get you in touch with the USCG quickly. And yes it MAY bring qualified medical help....but again it wouldnt be my first call depending on the emergency due to the possible lack of necessary equipment by the waterborne caregiver. Hech even USCG resources don't always carry much compared to an ambulance.

My exoerience has shown that trying to coordinate a medical emergency on the radio can be very hard. In fact the USCG will usually switch you to a phone if better comms can be had. Usually it takes awhile to gey important info through...back and forth.... so guessing what method of communication will get the best equipment and people rolling in your direction is paramount.
psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2018, 10:05 AM   #19
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,353
Every area of the country is different.
In the close-in populated ICW, for a medical emergency, I would call 911. In coastal wide open waters like Delaware Bay or Chesapeake Bay, I would call the CG on 16. My thoughts are the numerous state and local emergency resources including police, sheriffs, fire/rescue, ambulances and paramedics, are immediately available to the 911 centers directly. Response time is a few minutes. The CG has to go everywhere by boat or helo. That may take a lot of time to get to the scene. Most of the "golden hour" is lost to transit time.
An example: In SW Florida, there is practically zero presence of CG boats between Ft. Myers and St. Petersburg. That area is covered by various Sheriff Dept and FWC boats. In NJ the coastal ICW is covered by CG with NJSP and Fire/rescue boats secondary.
__________________
Archie
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Englewood, FL and Cape May, NJ
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2018, 10:21 AM   #20
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 17,994
Even then Archie, the Townsends Inlet USCG boat may be all the way up in Stathmere or 10 miles offshore....and true of other areas.

The rest is specific for areas but for genera memberl consumption.

Calling 911 behind Avalon, Stone Harbor, Sea Isle, etc and pulling into one of a thousand possible offload spots might be way quicker...so much so I would bet my life there rather calling Mayday. Now ofv thd coast headed for an inlet...even right along the beach...sure call Mayday and see how quick the USCG can get an ambulance to the first available dock.

If I think I can pull over to even a private dock, get the address from google maps and get an ambulance there in minutes...that going to be my decision.

If in the middle of the Dismal Swamp...I would stick my nose in the trees to the bank if I could get an ambulance to meet me as it would take awhile for any vessel to get in and out of the canal.

In the middle of the Alligator Pungo River Canal...heck getting to a road or being met by boat or helo would be a crapshoot...so a Mayday would probably be effective unless I was right at one of the bridges.

My apologies to all those who have no clue of where I am talking about. Many loopers or East Coast US snowbirders probably do so its just a reference to population centers and shore accesibility with nearness to ambulance/paramedic services. Have a clue....save a life.
__________________

psneeld is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:47 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012