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Old 07-03-2016, 06:05 PM   #1
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How well does your cockpit drain?

There's been some talk in some other threads about scuppers and cockpit drainage, and I'm wondering how other member's boats would handle getting pooped.

According to ABYC requirements, a cockpit completely filled with water to the "fixed sill height" must drain 75% within 90 seconds.

90 seconds is a long time to have that much water (hopefully) above the waterline in rough seas, but its

I haven't had the chance to test mine yet (and don't plan on it) but I think my 2 x 2" and 2 x 1" scupper drains would struggle to shed this much water. (although the cockpit may empty into the cabin, but that's another issue)

As many of you try to keep your boats ABYC compliant in most aspects, does anyone have a well draining cockpit?
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Old 07-03-2016, 07:09 PM   #2
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This was my answer to the tiny scuppers which would never have drained my welldeck in any reasonable time.
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Old 07-03-2016, 09:28 PM   #3
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Great plan, Brooksie! I know I don't have the skupper capacity to past the test, although I planned to add two others. I like your idea better.
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Old 07-03-2016, 09:35 PM   #4
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Any boat that runs inlets or spends time on open ocean should be prepared to handle getting pooped, slammed, broadsided, or whatever else causes a flooded cockpit.
More than adequate drains are only the beginning.
Just for fun, calculate the weight of your cockpit full of water, than add that number to your boats normal loading and then the new waterline you will be sporting. All the scuppers in the world do no good when they are underwater, and flappers are pretty useless when submerged.
The housekeeping in the cockpit must be immaculate, because everything loose will immediately move to the drains.
Chair cushions, rugs, sponges, rags, chamios, fishing gear, fish, food, beer/sodas, Ice, towels, t shirts, etc will plug them up.
Many boats have unsealed hatches that will float, so these guys need to have huge bilge pumping capability.
Your best friend in such an emergency is the 5 gallon bucket (not the old one that has sat out in the sun for years), and strong arms that can bail like hell for a sustained period.
If it happens to you, get on the throttle, and do not stop!
Don't ask me how I know!
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Old 07-07-2016, 06:49 AM   #5
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"All the scuppers in the world do no good when they are underwater,"

AS long as the water in the cockpit is being lifted up from sea level, the scuppers will drain , even tho you cant see it.
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:14 AM   #6
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Fast. Here is two of four freeing ports in our cockpit.

We've never had green water in the cockpit, but the size and location of the ports was by the naval architect.

Conall
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Old 07-07-2016, 07:33 AM   #7
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It would be interesting to run the numbers but I suspect the screws on the latch on our cockpit door (which swings out) would give way, thus creating a massive scupper. Securing it with a heavy rubber band or light zip tie to allow for a easier breakaway might be a good idea when running in extreme weather.
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