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Old 08-14-2016, 10:18 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Jeffrey S View Post
My wife and I were EMT's for 20 years. We give a talk on emergency medicine for coastal cruising boaters and have been doing it for 5+ years.

One of our scenarios is the typical husband pulling up the anchor. The wife hears him yell out and runs to the bow to see 3 fingers rolling down the deck. He's grabbing his hand with blood everywhere yelling for help, bandages, etc.

You're the wife. It's a serious emergency with more blood on the deck than you've ever seen in your life. What's the first thing you do to help?
Catch the fingers before they roll off deck.

Same time tell husband to compress his hand's blood flowing areas against his shirt/stomach and with other hand's fingers grab wrist of injured hand as tightly as possible.

Once loose fingers are in secure location take rope or belt and apply truncate pressure tightly to his arm just above wrist.

Grab fingers and assist husband to rear of boat area.

Place fingers on ice.

Call on SS and cell phone for may day assistance.

From that point - depends where your boat is and what is going on to determine next actions taken.

I'm no expert... but that is what I'd do and hope my wife would do too. I'm interested to read other responses.
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Old 08-14-2016, 11:16 PM   #22
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Folivier, they should have a shut off switch.
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Old 08-15-2016, 12:00 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffrey S View Post
My wife and I were EMT's for 20 years. We give a talk on emergency medicine for coastal cruising boaters and have been doing it for 5+ years.

One of our scenarios is the typical husband pulling up the anchor. The wife hears him yell out and runs to the bow to see 3 fingers rolling down the deck. He's grabbing his hand with blood everywhere yelling for help, bandages, etc.

You're the wife. It's a serious emergency with more blood on the deck than you've ever seen in your life. What's the first thing you do to help?
IMHO

Secure the boat first. Make sure you're not drifting over the falls, in front of an oncoming tanker or about to run aground. Don't let one emergency become two. Probably not the plan you're husband wants to hear but you can't help him if you're a victim too.
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Old 08-15-2016, 02:00 AM   #24
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Interesting question, I'll go with Notlandlocked...., secure the boat then with Art's secure the fingers.

One further thing I did not mention during my little mishap. After the chain incident my partner ran to me, leaving the wheel unattended and boat in gear. I did mention to her that that was not a good idea as there was a ferry on our port bow about to cross our wake.

A slight hijack here(as it's my thread I guess that is OK), as Jeffery mentioned that he & his wife are knowledgeable in emergency situations, as are some others on the forum, maybe it would be worthwhile to put up a sticky with general advice covering how to handle handle general medical and emergency procedures.Just a thought.
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Old 08-15-2016, 06:33 AM   #25
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Most people would have gone with something about compression or bandaging. Notlandlockedforlong is the rare exception. If he had any firefighting or EMS experience, it was unfair!

The first thing to do in any emergency situation is something called "scene safety." The patient might not like it but ignoring the fact that the state of the anchor was unknown could turn a life changing situation into a life threatening one. Leaving the boat in gear is another example of an incorrect first response especially when too many things are happening and everyone is so distracted.

In any real emergency situation at anchor as described, the second thing to do is to issue a Mayday on VHF 16 along with making a lot of noise - horns, whistles, etc - to attract attention and possible nearby help - I've responded to 2 emergency calls from my boat to a nearby boat - we carry a small ambulance of supplies and equipment including a defibrillator. Here's where a handheld would really help to allow you to answer the Mayday request while attending to the patient as the third step.

This OP case is a good one that looks on-the-line as a Mayday. But it wasn't - it should have been called if there was any chance of losing a limb or causing permanent damage.

The third step is the general CPR ABC steps - airway, breathing, circulation. But that only should happen when the scene is safe and help is on the way. Again, this is for a real emergency - heart attack, stroke, anaphylaxis, trauma, environmental emergencies or any type of unexpected unconsciousness.

Never be slow to issue a Mayday. You're well more likely to issue one because of a medical emergency than any other reason but many people don't do it early enough. If you feel it's an emergency, you've met the CFR's and FCC regulations. I've been involved with multiple CG Maydays as the onshore EMS - a couple of times, it saved a life by getting the CG involved quickly. You can always call back to cancel it. Get the response started early.
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Old 08-15-2016, 11:44 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeffrey S View Post
The first thing to do in any emergency situation is something called "scene safety." The patient might not like it but ignoring the fact that the state of the anchor was unknown could turn a life changing situation into a life threatening one. Leaving the boat in gear is another example of an incorrect first response especially when too many things are happening and everyone is so distracted.

In any real emergency situation at anchor as described, the second thing to do is to issue a Mayday on VHF 16 along with making a lot of noise - horns, whistles, etc - to attract attention and possible nearby help - I've responded to 2 emergency calls from my boat to a nearby boat - we carry a small ambulance of supplies and equipment including a defibrillator. Here's where a handheld would really help to allow you to answer the Mayday request while attending to the patient as the third step.
My first thought to your scenario was to make sure the boat is secure. I am not sure that would be my wife's first thought however.

3 days ago was the 10th anniversary of when my Dad had a stroke while on their boat. They were anchored in Telegraph Harbor on Thetis Island in the CA Gulf Islands. My Mom had just finished making dinner and my Dad when on deck to take a picture of the anchorage. He came down below and was aphasic, confused and had difficulty with motor control.

My Mom got his seated below then immediately issued a Mayday. She then got my Dad to chew an aspirin. The Canadian Coast Guard answered the Mayday and dispatched a Canadian CG reserve boat out of Ladysmith. My Mom went on deck and essentially shouted for help. Anchored right in the same harbor were another couple. He was an EMT and she was an ER nurse. I am not sure if they heard the Mayday or heard my Mom shouting. They rowed over in their dinghy to render assistance. There wasn't much they could do, but it was nice for my Mom to have them there.

The Coast Guard auxiliary boat got there maybe a 1/2 hour later? I don't recall for sure. (Volunteers who got the call, got themselves down to the dock, got geared up and the boat ready, and then ran maybe 10 nm to where my folks were anchored) They helped my Dad into their RIB and took he and my Mom to Ladysmith where an ambulance took him to the hospital in Namaimo. Unfortunately, he died 2 days later from a massive brain hemorrhage. Likely secondary to the aspirin, and then the blood thinners given him in the hospital.

The point of the story is to reiterate what Jeffrey was saying. Unfortunately, this event had a bad outcome but it points out that it is important for both captain and crew to know how to handle the boat, handle the radio, and what to do in an emergency. If the stroke had happened while they were sailing, my Mom was perfectly capable of sailing, navigating, and handling the radio if she needed to. There were qualified emergency personnel a short row away who were notified and responded. Like Jeffrey, they had with them a complete emergency kit and the knowledge of how to use it. The CG was able to sent resources out to them quickly and my Dad was in a hospital a few hours after the event occurred.

My wife is not yet as capable as my mother but it is something that we are working on.

This is the photo my Dad took.
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Old 08-15-2016, 11:59 AM   #27
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The story and picture are great tributes to your dad.
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Old 08-15-2016, 03:56 PM   #28
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Interesting question, I'll go with Notlandlocked...., secure the boat then with Art's secure the fingers.

One further thing I did not mention during my little mishap. After the chain incident my partner ran to me, leaving the wheel unattended and boat in gear. I did mention to her that that was not a good idea as there was a ferry on our port bow about to cross our wake.

A slight hijack here(as it's my thread I guess that is OK), as Jeffery mentioned that he & his wife are knowledgeable in emergency situations, as are some others on the forum, maybe it would be worthwhile to put up a sticky with general advice covering how to handle handle general medical and emergency procedures.Just a thought.
"ferry on the port bow about to cross our wake"?
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Old 08-15-2016, 06:21 PM   #29
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My first thought to your scenario was to make sure the boat is secure. I am not sure that would be my wife's first thought however.

3 days ago was the 10th anniversary of when my Dad had a stroke while on their boat. They were anchored in Telegraph Harbor on Thetis Island in the CA Gulf Islands. My Mom had just finished making dinner and my Dad when on deck to take a picture of the anchorage. He came down below and was aphasic, confused and had difficulty with motor control.

My Mom got his seated below then immediately issued a Mayday. She then got my Dad to chew an aspirin. The Canadian Coast Guard answered the Mayday and dispatched a Canadian CG reserve boat out of Ladysmith. My Mom went on deck and essentially shouted for help. Anchored right in the same harbor were another couple. He was an EMT and she was an ER nurse. I am not sure if they heard the Mayday or heard my Mom shouting. They rowed over in their dinghy to render assistance. There wasn't much they could do, but it was nice for my Mom to have them there.

The Coast Guard auxiliary boat got there maybe a 1/2 hour later? I don't recall for sure. (Volunteers who got the call, got themselves down to the dock, got geared up and the boat ready, and then ran maybe 10 nm to where my folks were anchored) They helped my Dad into their RIB and took he and my Mom to Ladysmith where an ambulance took him to the hospital in Namaimo. Unfortunately, he died 2 days later from a massive brain hemorrhage. Likely secondary to the aspirin, and then the blood thinners given him in the hospital.

The point of the story is to reiterate what Jeffrey was saying. Unfortunately, this event had a bad outcome but it points out that it is important for both captain and crew to know how to handle the boat, handle the radio, and what to do in an emergency. If the stroke had happened while they were sailing, my Mom was perfectly capable of sailing, navigating, and handling the radio if she needed to. There were qualified emergency personnel a short row away who were notified and responded. Like Jeffrey, they had with them a complete emergency kit and the knowledge of how to use it. The CG was able to sent resources out to them quickly and my Dad was in a hospital a few hours after the event occurred.

My wife is not yet as capable as my mother but it is something that we are working on.

This is the photo my Dad took.
A very lovely & poignant photo, I am sure it means a lot to you.
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Old 08-15-2016, 06:30 PM   #30
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Good reminder that it can bite. Hope you heal quickly.
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Old 08-15-2016, 06:30 PM   #31
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"ferry on the port bow about to cross our wake"?
The ferry was about a hundred meters off, and normally we would give way, being a ferry. However as there was no one on the helm we were steaming along on our original course forcing the ferry to alter course, and I think speed, to fall behind us.
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Old 08-15-2016, 06:44 PM   #32
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When I was in a motorsport club we had an ambulance paramedic give a talk on first aid at a regular meeting. We did the same at a small boating club where I`m a member, the paramedic was also a member, he works as a paramedic trainer for the ambulance service. (His sideline of selling defibrillators took up much of the talk). Both events were very worthwhile.
Andy, perhaps you could prevail on RMYC to hold a first aid instruction night? (Beats another "Eagles" revival concert.)
When I used to race sailboats the boat had an annual safety inspection requiring a first kit with specified items. I`m fortunate my partner has a first aid certificate and knows the basics, but in this area, too much knowledge is never enough (as HG Nelson might say).
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Old 08-16-2016, 12:14 PM   #33
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I feel a little less alone and embarrassed now. I did the exact same thing two years ago, accidentally stepped on the switch while holding the chain. I think I mentioned it here at the time. Cost me a good deal of blood and a few broken fingers. Fortunately I was at the dock but unfortunately was in the USA so we were on our own for medical attention. I straightened the fingers myself and the wife stuck the wounds together with wound adhesive. It took a long time and they are now slightly crooked but I have full use of the fingers again. We now have a rule that the master switch is to be turned off at all times.
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Old 08-16-2016, 12:50 PM   #34
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Since this seems to happen more frequently than I would have thought, I am going to be more diligent about being careful. My foot switches are those that have covers that you have to flip up to use. In the past I have turned on the power, gone to the bow and flipped up the covers and left them up while anchoring. From now on, I will try to flip them up only when actually raising or lowering the anchor, then immediately flipping them back down. It will mean a lot more bending over, something my back doesn't like, but that is better than accidentally mangling my fingers. I still need to work, and couldn't do it without them.
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Old 08-16-2016, 02:25 PM   #35
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If I can add one thing...

Our rule is that if you're at a dock of a marina with a medical emergency, instead of issuing a Mayday, call 911 immediately. Every EMS/Fire system in the US will have the marina layout known in their command procedures so even telling them that you're in slip J-11 will often be good. And again also, make a lot of sound. You never know if the boat next to you has a retired ER nurse aboard who knows what to do in an emergency.
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Old 08-16-2016, 03:25 PM   #36
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I have seen 911 responses to marinas in minutes.


It is often a half hour or more for any marine response. Sometime due to distance, often due to turf war or lack of 911 type response between agencies/communities.


If not even at the dock...but a few minutes away from one...better 911 than Mayday unless you are broke down, anchored or you may think there is so much boat traffic around that some vessel might respond with a highly trained and equipped crew onboard. But my vote in towns with paid or volunteer EMS, is still 911.
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Old 08-16-2016, 07:28 PM   #37
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[QUOTE=BruceK;470163]
Andy, perhaps you could prevail on RMYC to hold a first aid instruction night? (Beats another "Eagles" revival concert.)

Good idea.

Yes, all these revival concerts are a bit so so, I am a Leonard Cohen man myself.To see him sing in the Hunter Valley(wine region north of Sydney) under the stars with a glass of good crisp Pouilly Fume in my hand (preferably with all fingers attached) is my own idea of heaven..
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Old 08-17-2016, 05:53 AM   #38
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This thread makes me quite glad my only winch switches are at the helms, with no foot switches. I often lift the chain out of the gypsy to do stuff to or around my anchor/chain assembly, and always it is when I am alone down there. It has often crossed my mind I'm glad no-one can trip the switch while I'm doing it. Not having a foot switch near the bow has never been a problem either.
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