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Old 01-15-2017, 09:09 AM   #1
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Fast Flow Pumps (shaft mounted)

Anybody know about propeller shaft mounted Fast Flow Pumps which can run dry (moving air through the engine compartment) or spring instantly into action if you hole the boat while underway?

Fast Flow Pumps - Bilge Pump
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Old 01-15-2017, 09:18 AM   #2
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Now that's interesting .... I'm all ears.
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Old 01-15-2017, 10:15 AM   #3
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Works as long as you don't stop the boat. Plan A better be to beach the boat before going to neutral.
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Old 01-15-2017, 10:30 AM   #4
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I like the idea from an emergency bilge pump or blower stand point. As to doing both, it would greatly depend on where the inlet is. For bilge pump, inlet needs to be as low as possible. For ventilation blower, inlet should be as high as possible. Would like to read some user reviews.

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Old 01-15-2017, 11:23 AM   #5
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Works as long as you don't stop the boat. Plan A better be to beach the boat before going to neutral.
What if it's low tide in an area with tides over 20 feet, or there's miles of rock walls and steep shoreline to the next bay?
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Old 01-15-2017, 12:04 PM   #6
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...Would like to read some user reviews.

Ted
PDF of Practical Sailor article:

http://www.fastflowpump.com/Practica...low%20Pump.pdf
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Old 01-15-2017, 12:41 PM   #7
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The first rule of taking on water is damage control...

Reduce the incoming water and a turkey baste might be all you need.

Sure maximum pumping cabability will give you more time but what is your maximum?

I agree these kind of pumps are one of the best options...I just have no personal experience with them.

But generally.....concentrate on knowing how to stop/slow the water coming in....pumps are always the second line of defense.
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Old 01-15-2017, 12:49 PM   #8
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Thanks, good review. Think the installation costs could easily exceed the cost of the pump. If I was looking for that capacity in an engine driven bilge pump, it would be a clutch (electric or manual) activated, traditional bilge pump.

A 4" bilge blower at <$50 would likely work better as installation could optimally position it to remove heat from the top of the engine compartment.

Ted
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Old 01-15-2017, 12:56 PM   #9
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You can poke holes in any piece of equipment, and nobody is suggesting this be the only bilge pump aboard...it's just one more arrow in the quiver which could buy some time when it's most desperately needed.
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Old 01-15-2017, 01:14 PM   #10
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I kinda like the idea of instant water evac while I try to .... a.) find the source. b.) correct the issue. It makes more sense to me than the reverse. I will be looking into this.
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Old 01-15-2017, 01:40 PM   #11
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You can poke holes in any piece of equipment, and nobody is suggesting this be the only bilge pump aboard...it's just one more arrow in the quiver which could buy some time when it's most desperately needed.
My comments were based on taking the total cost (pump and installation) and comparing it to other options with similar parameters. Nobody is suggesting it's the only pump on the boat as it's worthless if nobody is on board to start the engine.

To me it sounded like a good idea until I read the Practical Sailor article and began visualizing the installation with pillow block bearings and a flexible coupling to the crank shaft or a pulley drive system.

For your boat and situation it might be a very good fit. For my boat I see a bunch of compromises. When you post it here, expect people to offer their opinions. Don't like my opinion, ignore it.

Ted
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Old 01-15-2017, 01:58 PM   #12
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My comments were based on taking the total cost (pump and installation) and comparing it to other options with similar parameters. Nobody is suggesting it's the only pump on the boat as it's worthless if nobody is on board to start the engine.

To me it sounded like a good idea until I read the Practical Sailor article and began visualizing the installation with pillow block bearings and a flexible coupling to the crank shaft or a pulley drive system.

For your boat and situation it might be a very good fit. For my boat I see a bunch of compromises. When you post it here, expect people to offer their opinions. Don't like my opinion, ignore it.

Ted
Fair enough

The impeller comes in two pieces, bolts to the shaft, and spins without touching the pump housing.
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:08 PM   #13
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What if it's low tide in an area with tides over 20 feet, or there's miles of rock walls and steep shoreline to the next bay?
Implement Plan B.
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:16 PM   #14
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Implement Plan B.
Whistling Dixie and looking skyward for assistance?
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:20 PM   #15
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I've recommended them in the past and any boat in my future will have them.

If you really measure the output of your electric bilge pumps, they will only hold back sinking on minor inflow. They work in either direction, so will work either forward or reverse, since it acts like a centrifugal pump with some amazing specifications.

Yes, you do have to build up the area where the pump shell mounts, and provide a good path to exhaust the water being pumped out of the boat. You don't have to pull a shaft since everything is clam-shelled and splits to fit around the shaft. It may be inconvenient to mount on a V-drive boat since it would be under the engine.

Yes, you do have to leave the prop shaft spinning for it to work, but chances are, you're implementing plan A while it pumps hundreds of gallons of water overboard as you head to the beach.
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:34 PM   #16
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With the varied skill, knowledge and emergency situation management experience in the boating crowd...

Lots will lose their $hite completely, others will dither, few will execute well...

There's a lot to be said for a device which requires no maintenance, no diagnosis, no interpretation, no intervention, and no delay. Water rises to the intake, and it just starts emptying the boat.

We all know boaters who need this sort of simplicity...

As luck will have it, I'd just be wasting time looking for a breach that ends up under a fixed sole, or otherwise inaccessible for heroic repairs... all the while taking on more water, with the bilge pumps still waiting for my Type A smarter-than-an-automatic-system personality to turn them on...

Anything that helps any boater stay afloat when it goes wrong, can't be a bad thing?

RB
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:38 PM   #17
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I've recommended them in the past and any boat in my future will have them.

If you really measure the output of your electric bilge pumps, they will only hold back sinking on minor inflow. They work in either direction, so will work either forward or reverse, since it acts like a centrifugal pump with some amazing specifications.

Yes, you do have to build up the area where the pump shell mounts, and provide a good path to exhaust the water being pumped out of the boat. You don't have to pull a shaft since everything is clam-shelled and splits to fit around the shaft. It may be inconvenient to mount on a V-drive boat since it would be under the engine.

Yes, you do have to leave the prop shaft spinning for it to work, but chances are, you're implementing plan A while it pumps hundreds of gallons of water overboard as you head to the beach.
How much vertical / horizontal shaft movement can they tolerate? While normally my shaft runs very smooth, when I dinged the prop last year, the engine, transmission, and transmission end of the prop shaft were moving around quite a bit. Obviously you get it fixed, but you still have to get to port.

Ted
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:44 PM   #18
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It's only bad if people think that's step one in a one step emergency management.

And no I don't think boaters are stupid by any shot.

But I have either been teaching boaters or rescuing them for a long time.

And what Internet discussion outpaces the other by a long shot?

Bilge pumps over damage control.

If you have a serious issue, it's damage control that will save you over bilge pumps most of the time.

Even if the damage control that saves your boat is merely knowing where your thru hulls are and securing it, assuming it works as advertised.

So I think these pumps in theory are great...how much have I heard about them in the real world over reading? Not at all....and the early models I believe we're back in the 70s or early 80s.

So....to me it might or might not be a great idea....where are the real world testimonials and I don't mean off their website.?
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Old 01-15-2017, 02:53 PM   #19
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Re the blower function, most boats in concern on these pages use passive ER ventilation, and many of these function on the ragged edge of starvation, as indicated by ER temp.
I would hesitate to further deplete the air supply by running an exhaust blower constantly.
Your engines thrive on cool clean air and even a moderately sized diesel gulps prodigious quantities of it. (Think about motor displacement x RPM)
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Old 01-15-2017, 03:20 PM   #20
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Would a cheap 120v submersible pump work for an emergency situation? As long as the generator runs I guess.
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