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Old 08-13-2017, 08:55 AM   #21
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A hint, consider winterizing your vessel even if in a heated "Northern" storage building. A few days of no building power can happen.
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:07 AM   #22
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I store inside in an unheated building with a dirt floor. It costs me about $2,000 a year for the storage plus an additional $500 for haul/launch and pressure launch. My boat is 33' and I would never store it inside in heated storage. I also store my 36' sailboat outside. I pay about $2,100 for haul/launch, unstep/step spars (ketch) and pressure wash.
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:14 AM   #23
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Winter storage in the northland

One thing to keep in mind with winter storage is that you are on the yard schedule. Many facilities, both indoor and outdoor, pack boats like sardines. The only space between boats is for travel lift or hydraulic trailer. Boats first in are last out. I looked at a boat in Sandusky, huge converted plywood factory. I was there in March but because of the boat location in the building, it was not scheduled for launch until mid May. You may be able to negotiate an arrival date, "last in", that will get you out on an earlier date. When I lived in Minnesota our launch target was April 15 but was could be subject to river flood levels.
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Old 08-13-2017, 09:38 AM   #24
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A hint, consider winterizing your vessel even if in a heated "Northern" storage building. A few days of no building power can happen.
The modern storage facilities use well insulated buildings. It might take as much as a week to overcome the heat mass in the building and heat coming out of the ground through the concrete floor. The two buildings I looked at both had multiple heaters and a standby generator.

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Old 08-13-2017, 10:30 AM   #25
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The modern storage facilities use well insulated buildings. It might take as much as a week to overcome the heat mass in the building and heat coming out of the ground through the concrete floor. The two buildings I looked at both had multiple heaters and a standby generator.

Ted
Sounds great if you can find them as you describe. As others have mentioned and my experiences show, avoiding the need for heated winter storage in the inland North can be avoided if one so chooses.

Some storage places along the upper Mississippi get flooded with loss of power well before freezing conditions are gone. So storage in a "safe" locale is much prized.
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Old 08-16-2017, 01:39 AM   #26
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Now, from some of the comments, it seems like the winter storage might consume more time than I expected. I hear "be there by November", and "you can be out by April or May". After doing a bit more digging on weather, once you get up into the great lakes area, the winter time frame gets pretty long, so the boat could be tied up 5 months. Besides, getting out too early, like mid to late March could be freezing cold. I don't want to tie the boat up for 5 months.

I'm rethinking this a bit... and considering a 1 year plan, and perhaps going back to closer areas like the east coast for a summer run. And I'd spend more time on the boat and skip a few travels that I had that would take 6 weeks or longer. Just a thought.
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Old 08-16-2017, 06:50 AM   #27
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I will assume you are planning to do the loop over an extended period of time and plan to leave the boat "up north" for the winter. I suspect also, it is a one off deal. We kept our boat up on the Great Lakes in heated winter storage. Typically, the boats would be hauled and bottom cleaned in mid October and serviced and launched in mid May. The cost was about $3700 for a 38' Taiwanese Tub and included haul out and launch. Bottom cleaning was a small amount extra as was keeping the batteries charged. We were in a very rural location in NW Michigan and the climate is rather harsh in the winter. Since our boat was older, I wouldn't even think of non heated storage.

Our marina had an unheated barn and most of the boats in it were either gassers or boats for sale (usually for years).

As has been mentioned, boats are packed in either "barn" storage very tight as every square foot represents revenue for the marina. Try to make your reservations as early as possible for as the economy has improved, it seems more boats are looking for heated winter storage. If you let the marina know beforehand when you want the boat launched, they will try to accommodate you.

So yeah, you should go for heated winter storage and you will sleep good on it.
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Old 08-16-2017, 07:21 AM   #28
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Donsan what was the Michigan yard? I'm looking at my options up here.
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Old 08-16-2017, 07:43 AM   #29
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what was the Michigan yard?
The yard was Onekama Marine, a few miles north of Manistee. It really is rural there.
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:10 AM   #30
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Now, from some of the comments, it seems like the winter storage might consume more time than I expected. I hear "be there by November", and "you can be out by April or May". After doing a bit more digging on weather, once you get up into the great lakes area, the winter time frame gets pretty long, so the boat could be tied up 5 months. Besides, getting out too early, like mid to late March could be freezing cold. I don't want to tie the boat up for 5 months.
It depends where on the great lakes you're talking about, but I'd say that unless you're very hearty and adventurous the traveling season is really only five months max. Mid May through mid October. Even that's pushing it in most areas. In the northern sections it's more like three months. I went through the North Channel at the end of May last year and was the first transient at most of the places I stopped, and most of the local boats were still under cover. So realistically you're tied up for more than five months.
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Old 08-16-2017, 09:32 AM   #31
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Now, from some of the comments, it seems like the winter storage might consume more time than I expected. I hear "be there by November", and "you can be out by April or May". After doing a bit more digging on weather, once you get up into the great lakes area, the winter time frame gets pretty long, so the boat could be tied up 5 months. Besides, getting out too early, like mid to late March could be freezing cold. I don't want to tie the boat up for 5 months.

I'm rethinking this a bit... and considering a 1 year plan, and perhaps going back to closer areas like the east coast for a summer run. And I'd spend more time on the boat and skip a few travels that I had that would take 6 weeks or longer. Just a thought.
The extended boating season on the Great Lakes is May 1-Oct 15. Most boat a shorter time. What we did on the Loop was ran up the East Coast just in time to leave NYC when the Erie Canal opened. Last year that was May 1. We then used from May 1 to Sept 30 to boat on the lakes and left Chicago on October 15 to head south. Even on that schedule we hit some cold temperatures for brief periods on both the Erie and on the Illinois.
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Old 08-16-2017, 11:36 AM   #32
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The extended boating season on the Great Lakes is May 1-Oct 15. Most boat a shorter time. What we did on the Loop was ran up the East Coast just in time to leave NYC when the Erie Canal opened. Last year that was May 1. We then used from May 1 to Sept 30 to boat on the lakes and left Chicago on October 15 to head south. Even on that schedule we hit some cold temperatures for brief periods on both the Erie and on the Illinois.
Band,

Makes a lot of sense, and that would be easy to do for us, leaving in early March.

Did you continue all the way back to FL or did you tie it up for the winter somewhere south of Chicago?

I had a place in Kenosha, WI for about 25 years and spent a fair amount of time there. I did boating and water sports from April thru Nov 1 (when boats had to be off the lake... this was lake boating).

Occasionally it would freeze before Thanksgiving, which would make boating hard. However, other than a few weeks a year it was cool enough for a long sleeved shirt, and a shorty when windsurfing.

I wouldn't mind departing Chicago area Oct 15 and I know there will be cole. However, once down to the souther part of the state, it gets a LOT warmer.

Good info.... hate cold... think I'll hop in the jacuzzi.....
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Old 08-16-2017, 11:59 AM   #33
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We continued down to the TN River and left the boat there for a while. Then cruised the TN River. Now going to cruise the Cumberland. Still wanting to cruise the Missouri, the Arkansas, the Ohio, the upper Mississippi, the TN Tom and the lower Mississippi. We have cruised the coastal areas several times. Not certain our plans after the Cumberland. May leave the boat on the TN so we can cruise more rivers next year or might bring it home then get more the next time we Loop. On the TN River you pick up more months of boating.

In NC we boated year round on the lake although the chances in January were slim. We've never stored a boat on land or winterized one.
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Old 08-16-2017, 08:25 PM   #34
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As a newbie I really enjoyed reading this thread. Thank y'all for posting to it!!
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Old 08-30-2017, 10:36 PM   #35
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A lot of indoor storage places won't let you work on your boat when it is stored. Usually they cram them in, and if you're working on your boat and something goes wrong (e.g. fire), you could destroy a building full of boats. If your intention is to work on the boat over the winter, better make sure the place you choose allows it.

For me, that pretty much negates the benefit of storing it inside during the winter in the first place.
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Old 08-30-2017, 10:54 PM   #36
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The only thing my storage facility does not allow is sanding bottom paint indoors. Last winter I added a hardtop to the flybridge, fabricated flybridge enclosure, did many fiberglass repairs, sanded all non skid off decks, painted flybridge and cabin with 2 part poly paint, painted decks with Kiwigrip, sanded teak toe rail and finished it, added a stern thruster, did a lot of electrical work and some through hulls. This winter I am doing some fiberglass work on the hull and 2 part poly paint on hull, more teak sanding and refinishing, replacing 11 portholes with S/S ports, replacing the main AC/DC electrical panel and whatever else pops up. I couldn't get by without my indoor storage. Even when it is cold, I use a large propane heater and keep on working.
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Old 11-10-2017, 08:00 PM   #37
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This is the first year I had to pay for haul out, winterizing, shrink wrap. Outside storage has run me $2200. Not bad. Inside heated would have been $4000. 34' flybridge
Lake Michigan ar St. joe mich.
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Old 11-11-2017, 11:55 AM   #38
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We keep our boat at Winter Harbor Marina, Brewerton NY just past Oneida Lake. They have 2 state of the art massive buildings including sprinklers and Back up generators. Power or no power your boat will always be warm. The staff at this marina is incredible, and I would not store my boat anywhere else. There is something to be said for just needing to empty your fridge, remove your perishibles and your good to go for the winter months. Indoor heated is by far the way to go.
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