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Old 07-24-2019, 10:56 AM   #1
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Permanent Anchor for docking

Hi,

I'm looking for a permanent solution for an anchor that I can put in the water adjacent to my boat that will hold it during storms.

I'm thinking of some sort of huge screw/auger in anchor, perhaps expanding that will just stay on the bottom that I can hook my line to that will hold the boat.

Perhaps a cement base? Thoughts and ideas?

No, I don't want to put a piling in as when not in use, it would lie on the bottom so a boat could just go over it.
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Old 07-24-2019, 11:49 AM   #2
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What you're describing is a Helical Mooring. There are many manufacturers out there.
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Old 07-24-2019, 11:51 PM   #3
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Depends on what the bottom is.

I here an old large engine block makes an excellent anchor in softer bottoms once you let it work its way in a bit.
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Old 07-25-2019, 12:28 AM   #4
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Go with the Helicoil.
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Old 07-25-2019, 08:22 AM   #5
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Locally we use a several ton block of granite with a steel staple passed through it and a chunk of chain attached to the staple.
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Old 07-25-2019, 09:17 AM   #6
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Concrete loses approx 40% of its weight when submerged. A lot of places now frown upon using engine blocks.
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Old 07-25-2019, 09:23 AM   #7
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Depends on the bottom and the area - where we are the typical solution would be an appropriately sized mushroom mooring with a primary and secondary chain attached to a surface ball. From the ball you would have multiple pennants attached to the boat dependent upon size and weight.
In our soft bottom harbors the mushroom, anchor will take a 'set' in a couple of weeks.
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Old 07-25-2019, 09:39 AM   #8
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All of these have been used for moorings in one place or the other. The proper selection depends on the bottom, availability and local regs.

Granite block, concrete cast pyramid, old engine block, mushroom anchor, helical mooring, probably others. For your boat in a protected cove you will need a 1,000 lb granite block or 500 lb mushroom at least. Chapman’s gives rigging details.

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Old 07-25-2019, 09:46 AM   #9
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Need to know what kind of bottom. Hard/sand/mud? Depth?
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Old 07-27-2019, 06:34 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
Need to know what kind of bottom. Hard/sand/mud? Depth?
Bottom is soft mud for about 4 or 5 feet, and then a very hard mud pack. Some sand mixed in.
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Old 07-27-2019, 07:59 AM   #11
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Bottom is soft mud for about 4 or 5 feet, and then a very hard mud pack. Some sand mixed in.
That is a good bottom for mushroom moorings like in our area.
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Old 07-27-2019, 08:16 AM   #12
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Folks switch from mushroom to helix, nobody switches from helix to mushroom. There is a reason why.
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Old 07-27-2019, 08:45 AM   #13
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Folks switch from mushroom to helix, nobody switches from helix to mushroom. There is a reason why.
There are zero helix anchors in our area.
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Old 07-27-2019, 10:12 AM   #14
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One of the drawbacks to a mushroom is that it is usually oriented to the prevailing wind direction and if a storm creates wind from a different direction, it can stand the mushroom up and pull it out. That would not be a factor for you since your boat won't be swinging around it.

Helix anchors are much stronger but require a qualified installer and they may be hard to find, according to this article:

https://www.boatus.com/hurricanes/moorings1.asp
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Old 07-27-2019, 10:17 AM   #15
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If there are no installers in your area, then the cost of getting the knowledgeable installer with the specialized equipment may be too high.

In that case you should use a 2 ton cement block.
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Old 07-29-2019, 07:03 PM   #16
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It's pretty clear that a helix is a superior anchoring solution.


Now, the small one they make with one disc can be installed without the hydraulic installation equipment, if I can't get an installer in my area.



Wondering is 2 or 3 of those could be used for solution, put them in at angles and tie them together at the top with a plate. We do similar with aircraft tie downs.
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Old 07-29-2019, 07:19 PM   #17
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I am totally unqualified to speak on this, but, since its the internet......

I'd think if I was going to use 2 of them...I'd put one off the stern and one off the bow. That might do a better job of keeping the pressure off of your pier, and provide completely seperate and redundant solutions.
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Old 07-30-2019, 01:42 AM   #18
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The new issue of Boat/US Magazine came today. There is an article about hurricane prep in it. It has some stats on mooring anchor systems. Tests done by MIT, Boat/US and Cruising World found that a 500 pound mushroom anchor in mud could be pulled out with 1200 pounds of pull. An 8000 pound deadweight (concrete) block could be pulled out with 4000 pounds of pull. A helix mooring recorded 12000 pounds of pull which was the maximum of their test pull when a shackle broke. Helix appears the way to go.
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Old 07-30-2019, 09:41 AM   #19
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Your anchoring system has to give to unstoppable forces. The alternative is that parts of the boat will give. I'm talking extremes, like hurricane preparation. A weight, maybe a concrete block that rises and falls with the boat can accomplish this. the block keeps the anchor lines near the bottom so the anchors don't pull out. This system also keeps the bow into the wind. The boat can weathervane as the wind direction changes.

I've posted this before and believe everyone should be familiar with these ideas.

How to create an instant hurricane mooring

If another boat breaks loose and blows into yours, all bets are off.


If the water blows out of the river, or bay, and your boat bounces off the bottom, all bets are off.
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Old 07-30-2019, 10:28 AM   #20
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More on mooring. The world according to crisflo.

https://sites.google.com/site/crisfl...bra/sea-anchor
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