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Old 10-21-2014, 10:24 AM   #1
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Talking Marina Etiquette

Good Read and a great survey!

Pacific Northwest Boating News: Burning Question | Marina etiquette | Three Sheets Northwest
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Old 10-21-2014, 10:44 AM   #2
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Greetings,
Mr. ASD. I seem to be in agreement with all poll responders except with regards to allowing wind generators to spin freely. I understand some can be quite noisy but I've no experience with them at all. Interesting point about lines on docks. We are of the "loop on the dock cleat" school with the bitter end aboard both for easier adjustment and a neater dock AND we have the wrong anchor...oh dayum...
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:28 AM   #3
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I should think wind generators would be an absolute no no. I remember that from my days in Everett WA.

My big gripe re marina's is boat overhang .. both ends. Some restrictions do apply in LaConner but there are still some boats sticking out 3' or more into the fairway. If you have a boat that's hard to maneuver or you lack skills (we all do or did) some selfish guy hang'in his boat out into your bought and paid for space is dangerous for at least personal property.

Something that occurred to me recently is the fact that the marina collects more moorage money when boats in the slips are the maximum allowable length. They make more money. That may explain why marina's are slack about correcting violators and the overhang allowances are established by the marina .. not the boat owners. But there is one positive aspect about overhangs and that is that the marina can accommodate more boats and bigger ones .. and that's where the shortage exists. I may be considered extreme but I don't think there should be any overhang at all .. in either direction.

Another thing I don't like is radios .. especially football turned up loud. It's like phone calls in a restaurant .. it's just very rude.
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:44 AM   #4
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I am in agreement with most.

i said NO to the noisemaker at the dock. We have been packed in so tight that the exhaust was entering the cabin and setting off the CO detector. Consider that us small crafts have ports very low on the water and if we are packed in tight, the fumes have to go somewhere.

all thought if it weren't an obvious safety issue i don't see a problem for power outages.

i also disagreed with the eyes down the dock. I use my trips up and down the docks to visit. if you are out, not already engrossed in a conversation or project i will stop and say HI. i have met many new people and had many good conversations.
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:49 AM   #5
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Bugs me when owners don't maintain their boats, and they become eyesores.
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:52 AM   #6
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I was about 50/50 with the replies. It's a community and we have to look out for each other... to a point. I won't clean up after people, but will kick lines out of the walkways. I (well, Bess really) will coil our lines, but not that silly flat coil. That promotes moisture to stay under the lines and we have all seen those stains on the dock nor to I want the lines to "train" with that curl in them. We coil them neatly, but it's a loose coil we drop onto the dock.

I will always help docking boats and do provide some extra horsepower when needed. I know a lot of skippers here hate that, but I fell you have to do what it takes to get a boat safely into a slip. If a boat is headed the wrong way, I will nudge it into place as I would expect anyone else to do for me. Don't get me wrong, I WILL obey a skipper's orders if they give them, but I would be more upset if someone let my boat crash into a dock because of some personal pledge they have to never be liable for someone else's mistakes. Gimmie a break. We aren't setting diamonds here... We are trying to get a oval peg into a rectangle hole. Sometimes it takes a bigger hammer. ;-)

I always thought the idea of asking permission to come aboard was weird. Sure, I don't just jump on Willy-Nilly, but if I am stopping by for a drink or a chat, I will just jump on without stopping and stating the obvious, "Permission to come aboard?" I assume you know I am headed that way anyway.

Halyards are a pet peeve of mine! Banging and clanging sail hardware is just rude. Sure, in 30k winds, about everything is going to make noise, but in a gentle breeze, there is no excuse for that 24/7 clanging. And you can bet that I WILL board a boat without permission (assuming I know the person) to secure it and leave a note.

The noise bit is a tricky one. There are times we arrive very late to the marina and are up before dawn to get an early start. We can be as quiet as possible, but boaters have to be flexible.

At the end of the day, there HAS to be balance. Weekenders are there to relax, unwind, and sometimes party. Liveaboards don't always live that schedule, so we all have to understand each others situation.

(FLAME SUIT ON)
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Old 10-21-2014, 11:55 AM   #7
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Oh...

P.S..... Still don't know what a "water bonnet is :-D
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:01 PM   #8
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P.S..... Still don't know what a "water bonnet is :-D
bonnet = valve
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:29 PM   #9
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It's interesting...people with lots of maria experience AND a little common courtesy can get away with almost anything. The marina group tends to know that particular person is there to help and make marina life nicer. Not everyone with experience qualifies as there are always those out for only themselves.

But reputation goes a long way and when "the qualified" passes judgement on whether the incursion aboard some one else's boat was justified, or water faucets swapped..or power lines rerouted...

Boating life is only perfect at perfect marinas...wish I could find one to stay at that had reasonable rates....
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:35 PM   #10
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That's a pretty silly "survey".

Any discussion of "etiquette" is pretty much based on what one person thinks another person is doing wrong.

People have different expectations of the behavior of other people but basically people should respect other people's property and rights. So in a marina, one should not disconnect another boat's water or power connections, move their dock lines, be loud and obnoxious, make loud noises late at night or early in the morning, leave fish waste in the dock carts or on the docks, allow their dogs to roam free on the docks, etc.

Just common sense, right? Treat people how you would like to be treated.
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:42 PM   #11
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Intresting survey.

The only one that was wierd to me was the eyes forward one.

At our marina, and I have no problem with this, people walk down the dock looking at boats. I do it...I love walking the dock looking at boats. We nose in to be out of the crowd along the fairway

People walk down the dock fingers between boats, and they look. If I am onboard and want privacy we have blinds. Be forewarned though... one of my Tibetan Mastiffs loves to lay in the pilothouse with his head in the doorway. He loves nothing more than to let someone walk down the dock finger and start barking just as strangers get abeam of him.

The rule for us is look, do not touch someone elses boat. That is unless it has a for sale sign. Then and only then it is OK to touch it enough to get your face close enough to peer inside and look. But, for sale boats are not to be boarded, just looked at.

As far as overhang, well that is not a owner problem, it is a marina managment problem. My slip is 50'. My boat is between 53 and 54 feet. Its going to overhang.
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:49 PM   #12
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marinas and occupants aren't like dirt property dwellers.

there are constant issues as failure of power poles, changing of slips, people coming and going that have an issue clearing other boats, poorly tied up boats, bad water faucets...etc...etc...

and that's the rub...it constantly requires different actions and adjustments from others sometimes to your boat...

Occasionally...BECAUSE IT MIGHT BE YOU that needs something out of the ordinary is why people break all the "rules" all the time in many marinas and we all have to understand.

Like I said...people with lot's of marina experience know this and make allowance for what seems to be "interfering" with another when in reality...it's just a fact of marina life. The trick is to make necessary changes without doing harm....
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:57 PM   #13
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Our marina doesn't have a lot of slips in the 30+ range and it seems everyone is hanging out into the fairway. In our narrow fairway., it gets to be a little tight while maneuvering my single screw boat. But I can't complain, I have a 34 footer in a 32' slip.
One of my more patient days at the dock one afternoon, I tolerated 5-10 year olds racing up and down the full length of the dock. It was all I could do to tolerate it. Don't get me wrong, I had little ones once too, but I wouldn't let then do that. Should I have said something? I waited out the 20 minutes until they tired themselves out/left the dock. But it was pushing my tolerance to the limit..
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Old 10-21-2014, 12:58 PM   #14
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As for halyards, the first time I tie them off, the second time they are on the deck.
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Old 10-21-2014, 01:00 PM   #15
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Greetings,
Water bonnet?


Note, this only works for cats NOT mono-hulls...
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Old 10-21-2014, 01:22 PM   #16
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They missed one: power lines hanging in the water. As a former owner of a Mercruiser outdrive, which are know for corrosion problems, this issue used to be of considerable interest to me.

I'll still pick a fallen cord out of the water. Repeat offenders are politely referred to marina management. It's not only a corrosion issue, it's a safety issue. Besides, a few da

Touching someone else's boat or lines when they're not around makes me uneasy. Sometimes it can't be avoided; rafted up, sharing a cleat, boat is sinking or an alarm going off, cabin windows inadvertently left open when it's going to rain, that sort of thing.

I've never talked to anyone who thinks slapping halyards are OK.

After that, it gets a little fuzzy. When in doubt, seek local knowledge.
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Old 10-21-2014, 01:38 PM   #17
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It's nice when people leave their contact information in the window. That way if a pump is running, a furnace is on, a line is loose, etc. a good samaritan can easily get in touch with the owner and ask what (if anything) should be done.
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Old 10-21-2014, 02:08 PM   #18
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It's nice when people leave their contact information in the window. That way if a pump is running, a furnace is on, a line is loose, etc. a good samaritan can easily get in touch with the owner and ask what (if anything) should be done.
I sometimes wonder if that isn't advertising that you are away from the boat, especially if your number is out of province/state. Perhaps I'm too paranoid.
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Old 10-21-2014, 02:28 PM   #19
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I sometimes wonder if that isn't advertising that you are away from the boat, especially if your number is out of province/state. Perhaps I'm too paranoid.
I display a contact number (whited-out in the photo). I think it is a good idea. The guard bear warns off potential trespassers.

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Old 10-21-2014, 03:20 PM   #20
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I will take care that they suffer no hurt or damage.

That's actually from the Hippocratic Oath. But isn't that what it is really about, trying not to do harm to others. Then within that we just have to use reason and common sense.

I would be hard pressed to come up with many absolutes as every marina is different, every boat is, every day is.

Safety issues I do address with the dockmaster. This includes lines in the water. It also includes tying across walkways (and yes it's done). And it includes the example of the kids running out of control up and down the dock. The parents who let their kids do that are the first ones to sue the marina and boat owners when something happens.

Beyond safety you get into "peaceful enjoyment." That's not the same at a marina as at home. I do try to respect the 9 pm to 7 am time window, although there are times to make a destination in daylight, we must leave earlier and there's no way to do that quietly. I'm not nearly as bothered by somewhat normal boating sounds as I am by loud bursts of noise, whether from boom boxes or loud drunks. As to the question of generators, in a typical marina setting we'd never run one. However, there are marinas with no electric or water or anything else where it's normal. Just not in someone's face. Typically on those transients find themselves side tie on a long dock and away from other boats. But we also take steps so it doesn't impact others.

Then the last part is socialization. We do and don't. My wife is more outgoing than I am. I'm more shy. But we aren't there to drink or party. Don't care to join in. No desire to hit the bar. We do like to sit and talk to others of like mind sometimes and sometimes even go to dinner with others we meet. The eyes front led to much giggling on the part of my wife. But on the serious side, I see us all there taking in all the sites and view. Peeping Tom is obviously wrong, but to look toward others, acknowledge if they do you, look at the boats you're passing seems normal to us. Living room? Well, close the blinds if you don't want to be seen. Many of us with homes live in neighborhoods where houses are close. Most people close the blinds to your bedroom there before you stand naked in front of the window. Now walking on the finger piers I consider wrong as they're part of the rental property sort of. I walk down the dock just as I walk in the mall, looking all around.

As far as asking for permission to come aboard, same as on land. If I'm invited to someone's home, I enter if they're there watching. If I'm not invited, I don't. And if they know I'm coming but they're not where they can see, I get their attention before intruding. I don't want to scare them. But it's different with different people. Our home is gated so people have to buzz to get in, but our friends don't have to and they make themselves quite at home.

Good Samaritan. If damage is immediately forthcoming, absolutely. If not, I inform the dock master. He has a contractual right to change or fix lines.

Last, I don't chastise others when they don't do things as I think they should. They leave a line hanging into the walkway, I'll take my foot and ease it out of the way, but I'm not going to lecture them on the right way. Now, when people ask or open the door to help, then I'll try to politely show them something that will make things easier on them.

Be a good citizen and neighbor. There was an older couple that docked beside us and needed a great deal of help or they would have damaged their boat. Later while no one else was around they spoke about being new and loving the water but the idea of docking almost kept them from getting out. I asked if they'd had any lessons. They said no. I asked if they'd like any. They said yes. The following morning we spent three or four hours with docking lessons. Once they learned enough to gain confidence it was easy. But previously the least thing wrong and panic would hit and then all would fall apart.

Respect. I will show respect for others and expect the same in return.
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