Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-25-2018, 08:23 PM   #41
Guru
 
ancora's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,603
I was remiss regardin' San Diego anchorage permits...they are free.
__________________
Advertisement

ancora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2018, 03:47 AM   #42
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 15,466
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
Life is simpler when one has USCG documentation while visiting states that do not also require state registration for extended stays. Surprisingly, California is one such state, at least for now. That doesn't mean one won't be subject to property tax.
That's all fine until you visit an another state and the moment you enter you are required to register.
__________________

BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2018, 07:05 AM   #43
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 18,087
One reason there are few free dink docks is many cruisers will bring in a boat load of rubbish to leave ashore.

Even if it is placed in a dumpster , there is a cost to having dumpsters serviced.

My ideal FL inshore cruiser would be a hovercraft style jacking spud barge.

When the local sheriff comes to tell you "anchoring is prohibited" , simply point to the 2 black balls to remind him you are aground.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2018, 01:09 PM   #44
Guru
 
Group9's Avatar
 
City: Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, (or where the anchor drops)
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1973 42 Bertram MY
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 503
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodland Hills View Post
If the boat is over 30 years old, the fee is $15 a year to register an “antique “ in Florida.
For those of us with "antiques" that's a pretty good deal.

Cheaper than actually registering our boat in our state (which doesn't even require state registration for documented vessels).

It's a always a losing proposition when you try to avoid handing over money to a government that has decided it wants it. Standing on principal is fine, but eventually it comes under the same category of pleading guilty to a traffic violation you didn't commit, because it's cheaper to plead guilty and lose, than it is to fight it and win.

Let your calculator, not your emotions, make your financial decisions.
__________________
Living life at one quarter speed.
Group9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2018, 01:19 PM   #45
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 7,190
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranger42c View Post
I've often wondered if the State could pass laws to acquire title to derelict boats after some (debatable) period of time, and (mostly?) fund towing/disposal efforts through assessed owner fees (if the owner can be found, and if the owner can pay), plus a partnership of sorts with a commercial salvor, a commercial parts house and a commercial (whole-boat) liquidator.

-Chris

Yes they can.


https://www.dnr.wa.gov/derelict-vessels
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2018, 02:17 PM   #46
Guru
 
ancora's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,603
The problem in San Diego is the number of boats anchored outside the breakwater. When the winter storms hit, some of them break loose and wind up on the beach at North Island. With no paper trail, the cost of removal falls on the U.S. Navy (read taxpayers.)
ancora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2018, 02:37 PM   #47
Member
 
City: Nottingham
Country: UK
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 9
Sometimes boats anchor for a favourable tide not months or to avoid bad weather close by, Or it's a nice spot to stay for while, you decide pays your money takes your choice
drcot3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 12:07 PM   #48
Veteran Member
 
firehoser75's Avatar
 
City: Nanaimo
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Pilitak
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 37
Here on the Pacific coast of Canada, the things that gets me POed are the proliferation of "private mooring buoys", the derelict boats (both on buoys and anchored) that never move, and fish farms. So when you come into a good anchorage that used to be great, it is now so full of boats, empty buoys, or farming equipment, that it is very difficult to find a spot at a number of locations. As an added bonus, if a fish farm "moves on", you have to worry about getting your anchor fouled on all the "junk" left on the bottom. Don't get me wrong, there are still bays where you can find space, but the popular ones are getting more and more buoys and derelicts.

Oh well, at least the scenery is beautiful!
__________________
Tom
Nanaimo, BC
firehoser75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 12:31 PM   #49
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,124
Quote:
Originally Posted by firehoser75 View Post

Oh well, at least the scenery is beautiful!
You forgot the clear cutting of timber on the banks of that bay....
__________________
Alaskan Sea-Duction
MMSI: 338131469
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 12:41 PM   #50
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,193
Quote:
Originally Posted by firehoser75 View Post
Here on the Pacific coast of Canada, the things that gets me POed are the proliferation of "private mooring buoys", the derelict boats (both on buoys and anchored) that never move, and fish farms. So when you come into a good anchorage that used to be great, it is now so full of boats, empty buoys, or farming equipment, that it is very difficult to find a spot at a number of locations. As an added bonus, if a fish farm "moves on", you have to worry about getting your anchor fouled on all the "junk" left on the bottom. Don't get me wrong, there are still bays where you can find space, but the popular ones are getting more and more buoys and derelicts.

Oh well, at least the scenery is beautiful!
Come north of Cape Caution
__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 12:46 PM   #51
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,124
Quote:
Originally Posted by MurrayM View Post
Come north of Cape Caution
Very true! Don't recall any fish farms north of Cape Caution.
__________________
Alaskan Sea-Duction
MMSI: 338131469
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 04:44 PM   #52
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cygnus
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,674
Quote:
Originally Posted by firehoser75 View Post
Here on the Pacific coast of Canada, the things that gets me POed are the proliferation of "private mooring buoys", the derelict boats (both on buoys and anchored) that never move, and fish farms. So when you come into a good anchorage that used to be great, it is now so full of boats, empty buoys, or farming equipment, that it is very difficult to find a spot at a number of locations.
The same thing is happening here on the "other" coast.

In Maine the problem is the proliferation of "destination" moorings. Even a remote anchorage falls within the borders of some town. All you need to do is show up at the town Harbormaster's office and fill out a form, slap down a few bucks, and you're the proud owner of a mooring. This gives you exclusive rights, 365 x 7, to your little patch of water.

If it's in a remote location away from town or shoreside houses, the locals don't care. They're happy to take your token mooring fee. But it means those formerly great anchorages are filling up with moorings which get used just a few weekends every year. The rest of the time, they're preventing legitimate anchoring.

I don't know the solution. Staying in a marina for $100-$150 per night is great when you're on your two-week annual vacation. When you're cruising for months at a time, it can get cost-prohibitive.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 06:07 PM   #53
Veteran Member
 
firehoser75's Avatar
 
City: Nanaimo
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Pilitak
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 37
CaptTom, I agree wholeheartedly. Murray, we were up your way this past summer (as far as the Grizzly sanctuary north of PR. It was great, but a long way to go and the fuel cost is getting up there.
Alaskan, soooo true about the clear cutting, but I forgot to mention it in my "fit of anger" about the other issues .
It's a darn good thing that we get to boat in Valhalla here on the left coast of BC, Puget Sound, and the San Juans, (and Alaska).
__________________
Tom
Nanaimo, BC
firehoser75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2018, 06:22 PM   #54
Senior Member
 
Martin J's Avatar
 
City: Mt Crested Butte
Country: USA
Vessel Name: St Christopher
Vessel Model: Cheoy Lee 50ft tri-cabin
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 290
One Interesting fact, not many know is if your boat is over 30 Years old there is no fee. You are classed antique and only pay a couple of dollars for the processing fee.
I bought my replacement 1981 Cheoy Lee 65 a couple of months ago ( currently refitting in Tarpon Springs) and came on this "quite" fee structure, 0n some document site. Not really advertised.
Martin J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2018, 03:31 PM   #55
Veteran Member
 
City: Grenadines
Country: aboard
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaskan Sea-Duction View Post
So this subject came up in another thread. So I thought I would create a thread dealing with this.

In different parts of the country, municipalities and States have restricted where you can throw the hook. Places like Florida that have multi-million dollar homes on shore and have restricted anchorage as it interferes with the home owners view.

There is also the legal question if the above has the authority to restrict "navigable" or navigation of Federal waters. I have seen places like Sausalito CA restrict anchorages by placing mooring buoys in an area that was full of live aboard.

What have you experienced with restricted anchorages?
\
The state of Florida is about as friendly as a pit viper in a bad mood if your "yacht" ain't worth a couple of million bucks.
They continually pass illegal laws regarding moorage and anchoring and if nobody stands up to the state, they get away with it.
In one case, I'd purchased a 72' shrimp trawler from a customs auction with the plan to turn it quickly after a rehab. I was dockmaster at a Marco Island Marina, but my "unsightly" trawler was chased out of the marina by the nose in the air Marco Island residents pressuring the marina owners.
Having nowhere else to put her, I dropped a pick right next to the bridge that connects the island to the mainland. Talk about pissed off a$$holes! Anyway, long story short, I'd anchored in the ICW's federal waters and there was no amount of pressure the residents could put on the state officials and the local LEO's that could make me move.
Essex had anchoring and mooring regulations for their tiny part of the Connecticut River. After a little research, it came out they not only had zero rights to restrict anchoring there, their town moorings were illegal and would need to be removed if someone informed the federal powers that be. Needless to say, a state of detente was reached and I never saw a city official or water LEO for the remainder of the summer.

Just because some municipality says it has the right to make regulations for a body of water, that does not necessarily mean they actually do. If you run into a problem and you want, do some research and perhaps the municipality will have to change their tune.
__________________
"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats."
-Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
foreverunderway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2018, 04:18 PM   #56
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 15,466
That's not about a state or even a city. It's about a marina that doesn't want a huge shrimp trawler being rehabbed in their marina. A marina owner has that right anywhere and I've seen it exercised nearly everywhere. Otherwise they'd lose regular customers. If you want to make the marina rules, then you'll have to buy a marina. Meanwhile most marinas will not allow an unsightly shrimp trawler to be rehabbed at their marina, especially those in a resort area. Had you leased yourself a slip and were you paying for it or just too freedom as dockmaster? Looks like the monthly rate there is just over $2000.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2018, 05:38 PM   #57
Veteran Member
 
City: Grenadines
Country: aboard
Join Date: Dec 2017
Posts: 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
That's not about a state or even a city. It's about a marina that doesn't want a huge shrimp trawler being rehabbed in their marina. A marina owner has that right anywhere and I've seen it exercised nearly everywhere. Otherwise they'd lose regular customers. If you want to make the marina rules, then you'll have to buy a marina. Meanwhile most marinas will not allow an unsightly shrimp trawler to be rehabbed at their marina, especially those in a resort area. Had you leased yourself a slip and were you paying for it or just too freedom as dockmaster? Looks like the monthly rate there is just over $2000.
Actually, the owner had absolutely no problems with my trawler in his marina. He was intrigued by the project.

I'm guessing you've never been to Marco Island Florida! It's one of those lovely Florida communities where a city official goes around with a ruler, and if your lawn is a ¼" too long, the city mows your lawn and bills you exorbitantly. Another really nice thing about that "community" is that you are only allowed to park an automobile in your own driveway. No trucks, vans, trailers or other conveyances. All the pressure was from a few condo commander type residents of MI.

These residents even had some sort of state government official come by and as we talked, when he found out I was the dockmaster (manager), he threw up his hands (literally) and said he would have no further involvement. He called it a great waste of his time.
Don't you think, as dockmaster, that I'd checked with the owner and my clients before bringing a 72' shrimp trawler to the marina? By the time she got there she was freshly painted and only an eyesore to the stuck up residents who had nothing better to do. Sounds like the kind of place you'd fit right in.
__________________
"Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats."
-Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
foreverunderway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2018, 06:04 PM   #58
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 15,466
Quote:
Originally Posted by foreverunderway View Post
Sounds like the kind of place you'd fit right in.
Well, I do like the area so guess you're right.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2018, 10:51 PM   #59
Veteran Member
 
City: PNW
Country: USA
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 37
Oh well, at least the scenery is beautiful!
You forgot the clear cutting of timber on the banks of that bay

I could not disagree with you more! Timber is an agricultural crop that seems to be managed quite well in BC. Really no different than a food crop, I am assuming you eat, do you complain about the fields that are plowed? We have hiked many a logging road in BC, easier to tie up the dink on a float at a camp than to anchor out. Been invited to dinner, and have had great conversations with individuals that log the coast.
Don't recall any fish farms north of Cape Caution
Jackson Pass
Sheep Passage
Stabi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2018, 04:20 AM   #60
Senior Member
 
Miz Trom's Avatar
 
City: St. Petersburg, Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Mariso
Vessel Model: 43-ft American Boatworks custom
Join Date: Aug 2015
Posts: 183
Quote:
The state of Florida is about as friendly as a pit viper in a bad mood if your "yacht" ain't worth a couple of million bucks.
I have not found this to be true at all here in my home state. It is too bad you did not travel further up the west coast. Boating is so much fun, and Florida is one of the nicest places to find a spot and throw out the anchor. Well, at least in the wintertime without the noseeums.



Quote:
I was dockmaster at a Marco Island Marina, but my "unsightly" trawler was chased out of the marina by the nose in the air Marco Island residents pressuring the marina owners.
Quote:
Actually, the owner had absolutely no problems with my trawler in his marina. He was intrigued by the project.
Not intrigued enough, perhaps?


Quote:
Having nowhere else to put her, I dropped a pick right next to the bridge that connects the island to the mainland. Talk about pissed off a$$holes!
This sounds rather stressful to me. I have learned that revenge-seeking is a very negative state of mind and can lead to a heightened sense of victimization.



Pea
Trying to figure out if I should varnish my sole.
__________________

Miz Trom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012