Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-13-2019, 01:53 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: Shasta
Country: Usa
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 47
Anchorage etiquette

Pretty new to the trawler lifestyle. I've read about problems between sailors and trawlers and other power boats in anchorages. We haven't experienced it (yet?). What is the difference in swing trawler vs sailboat? And what's the right way anchor a trawler with sailboats in a congested Anchorage? I've been researching and other than a few isolated instances not much to read. I've seen the butterfly arms with closed fists on the hip sign language. But knowing basic etiquette would be helpful. I don't want to talk in their backswing. Thank you for the guidance.
__________________
Advertisement

Selidster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 02:22 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
City: Hughesville, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Branwen
Vessel Model: Hatteras 48 LRC
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 407
I'm a neophyte at anchoring in tight spaces, but I've learned a few things. One of them is that there are so many variables that it's hard to generalize to rules that will always apply.

But a few I've learned that usually apply: Respect the space of others already in the anchorage whether power or sail. Use the shortest rode you're comfortable with, and if you suspect your rode may be longer than others due to being heavier than some of the lighter boats already there, give them more room. Consider what will happen if the wind shifts 180-deg, how the circles might cross, and what might happen if your anchor needs a few feet to reset, and adjust your circle appropriately. If the last to arrive and you see that you're closer than you or others are comfortable with, fess up and be the first to move. It happens, and it'll be appreciated.

I'm sure I've just scratched the surface. It's a great topic, and I'll bet that it's been addressed several times. A new look wouldn't hurt.

Greg
__________________

GregBrannon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 02:47 PM   #3
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 7,590
First, don't anchor in crowded anchorages, find another spot.
Second, anchor like you're the only one there. Simply, don't ever shorten your scope beyond normal to accommodate others. Your first obligation is to the safety of your passengers and vessel. If someone shows up after you're anchored and doesn't have enough room, that's their problem and they need to move.
Beyond that, be considerate of others and polite. Think of them as a new neighbor next door that's building a new house. You want to get along and live in harmony, but there are separation requirements from the property line and your house. It's their obligation to conform.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 02:51 PM   #4
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,834
Power and sail hulls lay differently to wind and current. If those forces oppose, they could swing in opposite directions. Likewise in very light wind and current conditions, where the boats just move around randomly. Unless each is well inside a non-overlapping swing circle, they could hit each other.

My approach, where possible, is to seek out the shallower parts of the anchorage. Sail boats avoid those. Otherwise, it's simply estimating the swing circle radius of each boat and keeping out of it.

There are, of course, exceptions. Steady winds or currents will force all boats to lay the same way, and allow tighter spacing. There are even places where a bow and stern anchor, or stern line to a tree, are required. Local knowledge helps a lot.
CaptTom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 02:52 PM   #5
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 19,980
Don't be a slave to anchorage books or guides.


While they are well known anchorages that are suitable...there are usually many more nearby...not always, but often enough to not even waste your energy going where everyone else is.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 02:53 PM   #6
Guru
 
hollywood8118's Avatar
 
City: Port Townsend Washington
Country: USA
Vessel Name: " OTTER "
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander Europa 40
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,757
trawler vs sailboat .. no difference, its always scope dependent.


often powerboats are more wind sensitive, keel sailboats current sensitive.


The most critical is to watch any boat that has a long scope rope rode out.


HOLLYWOOD
hollywood8118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 03:18 PM   #7
Guru
 
HiDHo's Avatar
 
City: Scottsboro, Al.
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hi-D-Ho
Vessel Model: 1987 Krogen Manatee
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 991
Donít anchor upwind or current from a boat already anchored.
Also if you see an anchored boat start putting out fenders port and starboard maybe you should check your under sized ground tackle and short scope.
HiDHo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 04:31 PM   #8
Moderator Emeritus
 
ksanders's Avatar
 
City: SEWARD ALASKA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: LISAS WAY
Vessel Model: BAYLINER 4788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 4,442
Do not be the guy that creates a situation where you are uncomfortably close to another boat that was already there.

If you find yourself in that situation donít tough it out, immediately move.
__________________
Kevin Sanders
Bayliner 4788
Seward, Alaska
ksanders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 04:39 PM   #9
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 3,481
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
While they are well known anchorages that are suitable...there are usually many more nearby...not always, but often enough to not even waste your energy going where everyone else is.
Not if you boat in New England/Long Island sound area. Anchorages are often very crowded.
Picking a good anchoring hole takes practice. You have to first be able to judge your circle, then you have to get the anchor to set where you want it.
And of course you need the proper ground tackle but that's a whole other subject I won't get into since it's been discussed to death here.

Trawlers with a full keel usually ride the current when the wind dies, but there are exceptions.

One place I anchor often (Napatree/Watch Hill, RI) when the wind dies off to say 5 knots and the current is running opposite my boat hangs sideways or sometimes stern to the wind. I might be directly over my anchor with 100 feet of chain not doing much. Sailboats will be with the current and the sea rays will be into the light wind.
This scenario can last a while.
That's the time I hope no one even thinks about anchoring near me.

Bottom line is you have too know your boat. And that takes time

Quote:
Do not be the guy that creates a situation where you are uncomfortably close to another boat that was already there.

If you find yourself in that situation don’t tough it out, immediately move.
Yes what he said.
__________________
Jay Leonard
Attitude Adjustment
40 Albin
Mystic,Ct. /New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 04:55 PM   #10
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 2,807
LIFO Last In First Out. If you are the last one trying to squeeze in and conditions change, you’re the first one that needs to move. Like others said, I won’t anchor where I might need to move. So if someone comes in subsequent that causes a problem that is on them.
__________________
Archie
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Currently southbound in South Carolina.
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 04:58 PM   #11
Guru
 
Maerin's Avatar
 
City: East Coast
Country: USA
Vessel Name: M/V Maerin
Vessel Model: Solo 4303
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 825
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selidster View Post
I've seen the butterfly arms with closed fists on the hip sign language.

^^^ Bitch wings. Anchoring 101.



Start with your ground tackle. If it's robust, good. If it's marginal, make it robust. We started with a knockoff claw and a Delta Quickset. They both sucked. Some sailboter now has the claw, the Delta is still hanging in the #2 spot, used it twice in 11 yrs. The claw was replaced with a Rocna 33 kg. Best money we ever spent. 400 ft of 3/8" chain. Bigger IS better. Comfortable anchoring starts with confidence in your tackle.



Anchor with adequate scope - as if you might have a 40 kt squall. Nothing beats trying to re-set an anchor in a surprise thunderstorm at 3 in the morning because you didn't do it right the 1st time.



Set an anchor perimeter or an anchor watch on a chartplotter. I like to set a boundary circle in Coastal Explorer that's 10 or 20 ft. beyond my anchor scope. It's a good reference point if it gets blowy and things seem to be moving. It will be valid even in tidal swings as long as you center it on the anchor.



Don't anchor in front of another boat, unless there's adequate room. Prefer to anchor astern of them. Be mindful of the other vessels' scope. Ask them if you can't be sure. A friendly "how much scope do you have out?" shows you're courteous and careful, and helps to remove some of that territorial posturing. Smile, and "thanks!!"



It's very disarming to a boater who's doing the bitch wings when you approach them with a smile and ask for advice. They were a newbie too. And maybe more recently than you might imagine.



Avoid anchoring near the "harbor sweeper"- the guy in 10 ft of water with 200 ft of chain out. There's no salvation for that guy, just go elsewhere and let him yank some other boater's anchor out.



Leave EARLY in the morning. Arrive at the next anchorage early, then YOU can get a perfect spot then stand on the bow and do the bitch wings as the stragglers come in and try to crowd you!
__________________
Steve Sipe
Selene 4303 Maerin
http://maerin.net
Maerin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 05:35 PM   #12
Guru
 
AKDoug's Avatar
 
City: Kenai, Alaska
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Melanie Rose
Vessel Model: 1999 Willard PH
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Don't be a slave to anchorage books or guides.


While they are well known anchorages that are suitable...there are usually many more nearby...not always, but often enough to not even waste your energy going where everyone else is.
I like this one best! Unless the anchorage is the only protection from the weather, don't anchor where everyone else is. Use your depth finder to locate a bottom (depth and angle of the bottom) that is acceptable to you to anchor in. I have many favorite anchorages not in the books, some I am quite confident will not be occupied even in the busiest season.
AKDoug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 05:58 PM   #13
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 19,980
I understand Jay's point about limited and crowded anchorages in New England.


But.... in many places where "protected anchorages" are discussed in pubs...


Often if just anchoring for a night or two...all you need is a lee...sometimes they can be found and you can avoid a strong or reversing current as a plus as opposed to going with the crowd.





The point is...published anchorages have been refined over the years for all around protection, usefulness.... they aren't the only places you can safely anchor though.


Learn what is necessary for safety and a good nights sleep....that's what it is all about other than if you are looking for something special...not just a nights stop.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 06:05 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
City: Rochester, NY
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Hour Glass
Vessel Model: Chris Craft Catalina 381
Join Date: Aug 2019
Posts: 459
Having plenty of rode length can help keep you out of the crowds as well.

As an example, in one of the local bays here, it's common to see tons of boats anchored for the day in a spot that's 10 - 15 feet deep. Move 1000 feet along the shore from them and there are almost no boats, maybe 1 because it's 25 - 30 feet deep. So that's where I'd go. And if that's full, there's a nice little cove further up the bay that's usually open unless someone my size or bigger has taken a spot in there, as it's around 45 feet deep (and maintains that depth until you're close enough to shore to worry about swinging into land).
rslifkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 06:12 PM   #15
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 19,980
I also find going shallower than the crowd as an advantage, especially as it shortens your swing.


I have a full keel so anchoring where there are tide swings and most cruisers worry about bumping bottom, I don't.


I feel confident enough in my calculations to ease into better protected areas and escape the crowd.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 06:24 PM   #16
Guru
 
City: Anacortes
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 777
Observe the pack but donít follow them. Do the work to know your vessels reported depth against the actual depth and your true keel depth. Take the time to know the forecasted weather, wind direction and tides, both for the time you arrive and clear through to late morning. Use the current depth to forecast the chain length of the boats already in the anchorage and then imagine corresponding circles of the proper size around their anchors (and donít anchor there).

Start with these principles and you will already be ahead of a very significant section of the population.
ghost is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 06:28 PM   #17
Veteran Member
 
Slowmo's Avatar
 
City: Lafayette
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Esprit
Vessel Model: 40' Tollycraft tricabin diesel
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 63
I've found that avoiding crowded anchorages in the peak of summer is not possible. It's easy to say anchor somewhere else, much less so to actually do it. As pointed out elsewhere, in general sailboats are more current sesitive while power boats are more wind sensitive, but this is not a hard and fast rule since many trawlers have deep keels that make them sensitive to both wind and current.

If possible try to arrive at an anchorage during the high season by early afternoon, at least in the PNW they fill up rapidly after 3pm. I've had people anchor uncomfortably close to me, sometimes I've had to move because I ended up too close to someone. I've had people anchor a bit close, I don't like it but as long as we don't hit or they don
t snag my anchor there's not much to say. If you're trying to squeeze in, be willing to relocate a couple times. Its hard to predict exactly where you'll end up when you drop the hook.

I disagree with people who say ignore everyone else and let out tons of scope. Unless it's going to blow that's a bit selfish. In a croweded anchorage we try to limit our scope if the weather will permit it. You may have to take in or let line out with tides, but everyone is trying to have a good time so try to work together.
Slowmo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 06:41 PM   #18
Guru
 
Alaskan Sea-Duction's Avatar
 
City: Inside Passage Summer/Columbia River Winter
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Alaskan Sea-Duction
Vessel Model: 1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,808
Some good info above. One of the BEST tools I have found while anchoring is a ranger finder. My admiral got me one this past summer.
Alaskan Sea-Duction is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 07:16 PM   #19
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: AICW
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 19,980
while I agree don't be a ridiculous scope hog...


having someone squeeze into a prime spot versus a secondary one doesn't mean I have to shorten or worry about telling them I am 5:1 and they are too close.


having been run into in anchorages in the middle of the night by others sailing on their scope and having the late comers try and lecture me on anchoring, tides, weather and safety..... elevated the mood from helping to ...well forrtunately it only went to slightly agitated...
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2019, 07:28 PM   #20
Guru
 
syjos's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Sandpiper
Vessel Model: Bluewater 40 Pilothouse Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 804
Arrive at the anchorage at a time that it's not crowded which is usually late morning when boats have started leaving but new boats haven't started arriving in droves yet.

Each anchorage has certain times when boats begin to pick their anchors up and others start to arrive. Day of the week, proximity to narrows, passes and marinas, wind direction, holidays, etc all determine the best time to arrive. We usually stay at anchorages for 4 to 6 days and observe the coming and goings of boats every day and try to guesstimate the time when that anchorage is the least crowded.

As others have recommended, arrive before the anchorage fills up, find a large enough open spot, put out the correct scope for depth and condition, back down with enough RPM after the anchor sets to bury it deep.

After I put the riding chain stopper on and shut everything off, my wife and I sit in the cockpit and wait for the "stupid boaters anchoring show" to start.

We've never dragged so I don't do any sort of anchor watching on the plotter. My wife uses shore references to estimate swing for her own satisfaction.

My wife will give boats anchoring too close her withering look.

Our generator is too quiet so I'll run the shop vac in the cockpit or crank up the stereo with AC/DC if they are close and stubborn.

The PNW is a crowded place during prime summer months and the number of new boaters seem to be increasing every year. Poor anchoring skills, lack of etiquett and no seamanship is prevalant.
__________________

syjos is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×