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Old 01-13-2013, 01:44 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Delta_JimS View Post
Suggest you do about 40 hours of study on wood boats and some serious soul searching before you put money down on a wood boat.(even if its free)
Wooden Boat magazine and forum.woodenboat.com would be good sources.

To start, try this thread:

Tell Me Why I Should or Should Not Buy A Wood Boat

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Old 01-13-2013, 04:26 PM   #22
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Honestly I don't really know what refastning is, I know what caulking is and how to do that, but that's about it
Hi Dean,

Not sure where you are. There are a few great resources in the PNW for wooden boats. http://cwb.org/ is one, and Home of the Wooden Boat Foundation and the Wooden Boat Festival - Port Townsend, WA is another. I believe ChristCrafts are carvel planked boats and were made with quality materials. However it's all about how the previous owner kept up on the maintenance. If she was refastened in '94, well that is almost 20 years ago now. And it depends on where and who the shipwright was that did the work.

I had a wooden boat surveyed 2 years ago that was "refastened" but it turns out the surveyor found a mix of both bronze and stainless fasteners, a big no-no.

So whatever you do, have it surveyed by a reputable guy with experience in WOOD boats.

This started out as a small job and is now $60K and will likely exceed that figure:
http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...tml#post126303

So, you know what oakum is?

Good luck!
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Old 01-13-2013, 07:01 PM   #23
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For wooden boat lovers, there is a 1974 woodie GB Alaskan 49, twin Lehmans, for auction here. Yachts & Boats for Sale in Australia & New Zealand | Yachthub, 41-50ft section. What a great looking boat!
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Old 01-13-2013, 11:00 PM   #24
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Yeah Bruce I went and had a look at that boat. It was recently up in Mooloolaba for a refit at Lawries.
I also saw whilst searching a very nice 42 Grand banks with a single 6LXB Gardner.
It says fitted from new so may be one of the ones built for local consumption many years ago by Riveria.
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Old 01-19-2013, 08:27 AM   #25
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Some nice wooden (and composite) boats in this online magazine:

Classic Yacht Magazine

We went to the launching of BEQUIA but just missed a sail on her.

Also looks like next issue will have an article on Grand Banks.
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Old 01-19-2013, 11:24 AM   #26
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THANK YOU DAVID!
For the Classic Yacht Magazine link.

Two perfect examples of boats that are clearly "slicers" are on page #39. The Matthews Sedan and the 40' Custom Express. I do think this is what Mark had in mind when he coined the expression "slicer".

Don (Moonstruck) may want to see page 92.
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Old 01-13-2015, 11:38 PM   #27
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I read all the horror warnings on boat forums about never, ever, never, never buy a wooden boat - never. Still... like a zombie drawn to living flesh... I kept getting pulled back to those gorgeous classic boats that have been completely restored. I don't mean a project boat by a weekend hero - but completely restored by skilled wood boat craftsmen and all the work done. Let's assume I found a boat that had been restored properly... meticulous records of the restoration... pictures... well known respected yard did the client work... and let's further assume a survey would confirm the work was exemplary.

Sooooo.... would the routine and scheduled maintenance really be that much more than the same exact boat with a fiberglass hull? I realize there can be a lot of exterior varnish on some of these boats and that can be a real chore and expense - but if selected for a minimum of exterior varnished wood and the hull was properly refastened/refitted when restored, etc. ... then what kind of extra expense are we talking about? Anyone with actual wood boat experience care to comment on costs? It sounds like wood hull planks explode when the 4th wavelet laps upon them, killing all on board, as the owner's wallet simultaneously combusts in flames.

And no, I'm not looking for someone to reaffirm any preconceived ideas I may have - as I don't have any - and want the truth. But seems a lot of restored boats out there that have the "dirty" work done ... but maybe I'm way off base... wouldn't be the first time. Thanks.
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Old 01-14-2015, 01:14 AM   #28
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Sooooo.... would the routine and scheduled maintenance really be that much more than the same exact boat with a fiberglass hull?
I've never owned a wood cruiser and never will although I really like the classics and PNW utility and commercial fishing boats. But we have a lot of wood on and in our 1973 fiberglass cruiser, and I know folks who have wood boats, so I've formed some opinions based on observation.

When you say routine and scheduled maintenance, if you mean of the engines and other operating systems in the boat, no I don't think there is much or any difference between similar types and sizes of wood and glass boats.

However, unless the boat is in a boathouse the effort to maintain the exterior of a wood boat requires, in my opinion, a lot more time and effort (or money) than a comparable glass boat IF you want to keep it in that "restored to perfection" condition.

The climate will have an influence on keeping up a wood boat that's out in the weather year round. But paint and brightwork require more maintenance effort than gelcoat and polished stainless steel.

In my opinion, if one wants a nice wood boat and wants to spend no more time on exterior maintenance than the owners of fiberglass boats, a boathouse is virtually mandatory.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:09 AM   #29
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Greetings,
Mr. P. Welcome aboard.
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Old 01-14-2015, 06:53 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pirogue View Post
I read all the horror warnings on boat forums about never, ever, never, never buy a wooden boat - never. Still... like a zombie drawn to living flesh... I kept getting pulled back to those gorgeous classic boats that have been completely restored. I don't mean a project boat by a weekend hero - but completely restored by skilled wood boat craftsmen and all the work done. Let's assume I found a boat that had been restored properly... meticulous records of the restoration... pictures... well known respected yard did the client work... and let's further assume a survey would confirm the work was exemplary.

Sooooo.... would the routine and scheduled maintenance really be that much more than the same exact boat with a fiberglass hull? I realize there can be a lot of exterior varnish on some of these boats and that can be a real chore and expense - but if selected for a minimum of exterior varnished wood and the hull was properly refastened/refitted when restored, etc. ... then what kind of extra expense are we talking about? Anyone with actual wood boat experience care to comment on costs? It sounds like wood hull planks explode when the 4th wavelet laps upon them, killing all on board, as the owner's wallet simultaneously combusts in flames.

And no, I'm not looking for someone to reaffirm any preconceived ideas I may have - as I don't have any - and want the truth. But seems a lot of restored boats out there that have the "dirty" work done ... but maybe I'm way off base... wouldn't be the first time. Thanks.
Most of the horror stories are true...but that doesn't mean every wood boat would be a mistake.

The first clue that a wooden boat has been truly restored and kept to the best condition possible within reason is the price tag will stagger almost anyone...not without good reason though. If the price seems reasonable...I doubt the recency and extent of the restoration. Only a few escape this reality.

Yes.... the hull alone has maintenance that can't be overlooked....actually more checking than maintenance....but letting the hull get away from you is why most would never own one.

If not said before....you can keep a wood boat looking good and afloat is one thing....cruising it hard in open water is another....

There are more than a few "well, it depends" when it comes to boat ownership...and to me never more true than with a wooden boat.
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Old 01-14-2015, 09:32 AM   #31
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Question

RT Firefly: Thanks for the welcome. I think Takei was right. Lol. Oh My!

Marin & psneeld: Thank you both for sharing your thoughts on this.

2nd Can of Worms: So what about those old wood classics that have had their hulls and hard tops fiberglassed over? Big 'no no' or what? Part II - what about those old wood classics that have been epoxied several coats and then painted several coats? Are doing either of these things a great big or what? Thank you.

Fiberglass example:
36' 1961 Chris Craft Constellation
1961 Chris Craft Constellation Power Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Epoxy example:
I can't quickly find an example at the moment but I'm sure you've seen them, too.

Example of classic with less exterior varnish:
38' Stephens Sedan Cruiser 1947
Wolfe Marine Sales, Inc. (Seattle, WA)
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Old 01-14-2015, 10:31 AM   #32
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I suspect "cruising hard in open water" may even be better in a wood boat as they are stronger setting aside puncture resistance of course but not many rocks to hit in open water. Wood boats may have the ability to flex more and flex more gracefully depending on her fasteners. But IMO a well fastened wood boat w sound wood throughout should be at least as capable and safe as a FG boat.

Other than that Scott your open minded post above is good ... and quite objective too.
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Old 01-14-2015, 10:31 AM   #33
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Question

Ugh! I posted a long reply but it didn't post... or maybe deleted because I did something forbidden, as I had a couple of example links included.

RT Firefly: Thanks for the welcome. I think Takei had it right. Lol. Oh My!

Marin & penneeld: Thanks for your input.

Can O' Worms, The Sequel - So what about those old wooden classics that have had the hull and hard top fiberglassed over? Excluding that being an abomination to a purist - is that something to run from? And #2 - what about those old wooden classics that have been epoxied with several coats, followed by several coats of paint. Big, 'aww, hell, no!' or what? Thanks.

(no links this time. hopefully this will post this time.)
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Old 01-14-2015, 10:58 AM   #34
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Welcome Pirogue,
I too would love an old wooden boat, if it was completely refurbished and 100% clear of any sign of wood rot. As has been mentioned, it costs a fortune to do properly and if the owner is expecting half his money back, it would still be an expensive boat.
If the hull has has been fibreglassed over - RUN AWAY. This is a cheap fix which is only done to buy some time. It is continuing to rot on the inside and nearing (or at) the end of its life.

A wooden boat which is fibreglassed over when new is a totally different story. If done properly, this can be a very effective way to have the best of both worlds.
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Old 01-14-2015, 11:39 AM   #35
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Thanks manyboats and AusCan. I love the "Key Largo" which states it has a fiberglass hull. But I thought I saw it said fiberglassed over wood - but can't find that now. Maybe it was a typo. What a gorgeous old boat. I guess that's a typo on the fiberglass?

YachtWorld.com Boats and Yachts for Sale
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Old 01-14-2015, 11:47 AM   #36
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Okay... I guess my posts aren't showing when I use a link - says must be approved or something. Doh! At least I know now why. I'll use a pic instead.

Thanks manyboats and AusCan. I love the "Key Largo" which states it has a fiberglass hull. But I thought I saw it said fiberglassed over wood - but can't find that now. Maybe it was a typo. What a gorgeous old boat. I guess that's a typo on the fiberglass, huh?

1961 36' Chris Craft Constellation


Eek - The Teak! That would probably kill me to keep up with... sigh.




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Old 01-14-2015, 12:07 PM   #37
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Okay... I guess my posts aren't showing when I use a link - says must be approved or something. Doh! At least I know now why.
There you go. I have taken care of that for your account now.

Normally, the first 10 posts are flagged if links are included. It's a filter to help keep our forums free from spam.

Welcome to Trawler Forum!!
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Old 01-14-2015, 12:48 PM   #38
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Greetings,
Mr. P. If that Chris is a '61, there's no way other than being a coated wood hull that the hull is FRP. CC started making FRP hulls around 1968/69. There was a thread on TF a while back regarding the fiber glassing of wooden hulls. Evidently there is "some" process that some posters stated was a good acceptable technique but you'll never convince me of that. Cold molded which is a wood encased in FRP technique is indeed an acceptable practice but not at all like, what I consider, the band-aid solution of glassing an existing wooden hull.
One other problem with wooden hulls in southern climates is worms.
Interesting there are no ER pictures of that CC. Could be a "lipstick on a pig" scenario.
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Old 01-14-2015, 12:51 PM   #39
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Now the hull of a carvel planked wooden boat that has been properly cold molded (not fiberglasssed) over the original planks will last a very long time and greatly reduce maintenance.
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Old 01-14-2015, 01:02 PM   #40
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Last year I sold a 90 foot wooden boat that was built in 1939. A Mathis Trumpy which many considered the ultimate American yacht built from the late 1920s through around 1970. The previous owner purchased the boat for $1,500,000 and then spent $2,500,000 on a refit. The asking price when I had the boat on display in the Fort Lauderdale Boat Show was $1,500,000.
If you like classic wood boats and have very deep pockets go for it, if you think the low purchase price will make boating affordable for you compared to fiberglass, think again.
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