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Old 09-03-2018, 04:00 PM   #21
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I like my wife to dock as often as possible. There are going to be some situations with a bigger boat (last one a Sea RAY 44) where muscle and braun are needed. Or anchoring, or going into a mooring. And what if you are injured or sick? With twins, I think most women can get reasonably good quickly. We had a woman captain in Seward this May doing a whale watching excursion and she was better at docking, iceberg calving, and going into those little coves than most males I have encountered.
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Old 09-03-2018, 05:24 PM   #22
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City: Southport, Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. Owned wooden 1972 Grand Banks 42 from 1986 to 2015
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Welcome to the Forum, and before I say another thing, let me also suggest joining the email list at Trawlers and Trawlering and your specific engine forum at boatdiesel.com. T&T has been around since about 1997-98 when I joined and has as fine a group of folks as you will find; many of us are here too, and boat diesel simply cannot be beat for getting to know those Cummins of yours.

Although a bit of a boatnik/water rat as a kid, I absolutely fell in love with the 80-foot YPs (predecessors of the 110s you ran) at USNA in 65-69. I was YP Squadron Navigator and Commodore in the last year and won the Seamanship award at graduation for the skills I learned aboard those wonderful boats. We took them all over the Chesapeake and to Philly. Later I won the Pacific Fleet J.O. Shiphandling Award for 1972 in large part based on those skills learned at USNA in the YPs.

After three DDGs, an LPD, a battleship and command of an ATF as a LT, I got my Unlimited Tonnage Master's ticket and played around in the Navy's civilian-manned ships and the oil patch a bit. I ran surface combatants through the maneuvers of AUTEC sound trials until 2012.

I bought a wooden 42-foot Grand Banks in '86 in SanDiego and sold it here in Panama City in 2015 to downsize to this boat and stayed on this forum and on T&T as the resident "waker." Really, despite all my hands-on experience, I just couldn't get along without the online boating crowd.

The single high-speed 315-HP Yanmar with bow thruster (do you have one?) in this boat is a totally different experience from the twin Ford-Lehman 120s (no BT needed) in my beloved GB. Just last week, I blew the seawater cooling hose elbow coming out of the seawater pump while at 3400 RPM making 21 MPH, and it was announced by a simultaneous sounding of the audible alarm as well as two idiot lights, one for engine coolant temp and another for the bilge pump just aft of the engine. Had I not added those idiot lights to the woefully inadequate instrumentation on the console of this boat, I may well have hesitated a few more seconds before shutting down while trying to figure out the audible alarm (probably by eyeballing the temp gauge). The combination of the two lights gave me instant cognizance of the problem - no seawater flowing to the engine. Slammed throttle shut and hit the kill button and saved the engine, but it was close with burning exhaust line material starting to fly out from the exhaust.

My description to the Yanmar part of boatdiesel.com forum engine resulted in others telling me that usually a clogged system is the cause of seawater hoses bursting, but because the previous owner (PO) and I always ran freshwater rinse through the engine before shutting it down in the lift, I was reluctant to accept this and instead blamed old hose. However, removal of a cooler end cap at the urging of the boatdiesel guys did reveal some encrustation in there. Running Barnacle Blaster though the system created a bucket full of really ugly looking mess. Those guys were most likely right!!

If you do not have Borel temp (flow) sensors on all your engine exhausts (genny too), do yourself a favor an get them on soon. Mine will be on there this week.

Regarding your proposed mini-loop around south Florida and shallower water running in general, is your underwater configuration such that your props and rudders are protected by a slightly deeper keel?

Again, welcome here because despite your obvious experience, you can always pick up good honest opinions and view points here you may not have considered.
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