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Old 02-10-2016, 10:35 PM   #41
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One caution, don't get the survey from the owner or broker. Get your own and do your own research as to who you wan't to use. This forum is a good source for that. Anyway, to answer your original question, I'm in Marina Cove in St. Pete.
I used to live in South Beach and am now in Kansas City, Missouri. Don't ask...

I like south Florida but not so much the Miami area. The water is great but the people leave a lot to be desired. I think I'd be happy further up the coast and possibly on the Gulf side anywhere between Marco Island and Destin area. I've considered the Gulf Shores area of Alabama too. There are some pretty nice marinas there.

I was warned by my sailing friends, who are building a new home in Cape Coral, about getting my own survey. The one I received from the seller was more for my information on exactly what it all entailed.
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Old 02-10-2016, 10:42 PM   #42
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East coast of Florida is a bit pricey, the gulf can be better if you look around. Many marinas charge a surcharge for livaboards, this one we're in does not. If you want to be warm year round stay as far south as you can.
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Old 02-10-2016, 11:23 PM   #43
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We spent the last year land yatching the gulf of Mexico, which most area the water is quite shallow so a deep draft sail boat would be limiting, or a deep draft power boat.
This comment surprised me, Phil. Are you saying that most of the water in the Gulf is not deep enough for a 4 to 5 foot draft?
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Old 02-11-2016, 12:00 AM   #44
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I'd like to be around $20k to $30k. I have a little wiggle room for an exceptional find.
Shat man! You've got it made. Keep looking, with that much cash, you'll find one in good condition that fits your needs. Especially if you wait till this economic boom bursts... which should happen sooner rather than later... by mid 2017 is what I figure as the latest date; for the next swoop downward.
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Old 02-11-2016, 12:22 AM   #45
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You've received a lot of good information so far. One thing I didn't see mentioned and feel is relevant.

There are a lot of former sailboat owners here. It's quite common for sailors to switch to power as they age. The reason is simply easier for them to handle, combined with more livable space in the same size. Health is a leading cause and I'm not suggesting slowly you're going to be falling apart, but often it's just one small think that leads to a different mind set or capability.

Sailboats are often considered less expensive to operate, but there's nothing cheap about replacing sails or other hardware and if you're motoring all the time then only a modest savings over power. If one has a true love for sailing then it's still probably the way to go but I think it takes that love for it.
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Old 02-11-2016, 07:29 AM   #46
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Delano and Scurvy--thanks!

Btw, as part of survey I would send the engine oil for analysis. It's a good way to see if there's any internal and expensive issues. It's not as helpful if the oil was just changed, be weary if it was. I'd also get or borrow an IR thermometer and check the engine out when running both cruise and at max. The top of the valve cover should be same temp across all cylinders. A spike in any could be expensive, but can't tell without pulling the top end off.
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Old 02-11-2016, 07:55 AM   #47
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FWIW, relevant to the discussion about power or sail, I don't find fuel our largest cost factor. It's all the other stuff, and I can control fuel consumption (somewhat) by paying attention to speed.


So that in turn would mean, for us, the power/sail debate wouldn't be about cost of fuel, but rather about features that each style offers (or doesn't). I like many sailboats, especially some of the MS versions (traditional Nauticats come to mind)and some of the cats... but living in a cave (as with most of the monohulls) and tripping all over the rigging (shrouds, stays, winches, etc.) would drive me crazy. (Crazier?) All that pesky "heeling" on a monohull is also problematic for us...


And then we find -- if we want to go somewhere -- it's much easier to just do it, in a powerboat. Usually no tacking/gybing required, even at trawler speeds we can usually get there sooner than if we were under sail, etc.


But then another trade-off is noise underway <sigh>... Ah, well, it would be, if the winds were consistent around here. As it stands, many of the sailors here have to motor quite a lot anyway, except for maybe March-May and again in Oct/Nov.


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Old 02-11-2016, 10:08 AM   #48
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syd

Here's a link to many South East U.S. marine sales I pulled out o' da hat fer ya. YachtWorld.com Boats and Yachts for Sale

855 boats (85 pages, 10 boats each) on YachtWorld...

30'to 45' / $20K to $50K / power and sail. Largest boats first, then size trickles down to the smaller ones. Scroll baby - Scroll!!

Good Luck!

Happy Boat-Search Daze!! - Art
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Old 02-11-2016, 10:20 AM   #49
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How Not to Sell Your Boat!

After looking at many of the boats in the YW link provided by Art I'll be amazed if many of them sell at all. Why is it that the majority of them have the worst possible photos of their boats? Don't they want to sell them?

First impressions are everything when it comes to selling something, especially via an ad on the internet, so why people don't take the time to stage their photo shoots is baffling to me. Hell, many of them didn't even take the time to clean the mirrors in the heads or tidy up the galley or even straighten up the berth at all. Simply amazing!
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Old 02-11-2016, 10:33 AM   #50
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You've received a lot of good information so far. One thing I didn't see mentioned and feel is relevant.

There are a lot of former sailboat owners here. It's quite common for sailors to switch to power as they age. The reason is simply easier for them to handle, combined with more livable space in the same size. Health is a leading cause and I'm not suggesting slowly you're going to be falling apart, but often it's just one small think that leads to a different mind set or capability.

Sailboats are often considered less expensive to operate, but there's nothing cheap about replacing sails or other hardware and if you're motoring all the time then only a modest savings over power. If one has a true love for sailing then it's still probably the way to go but I think it takes that love for it.
Good point, BandB. I sort of figured that and now it's been confirmed. Enjoy your day.
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Old 02-11-2016, 10:38 AM   #51
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Sailboats are great, but on most unless it's a big one the seating is just not comfortable .We bought our trawler and purchased some nice chairs to sit in rather than sitting on something . Big difference .
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Old 02-11-2016, 10:39 AM   #52
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Shat man! You've got it made. Keep looking, with that much cash, you'll find one in good condition that fits your needs. Especially if you wait till this economic boom bursts... which should happen sooner rather than later... by mid 2017 is what I figure as the latest date; for the next swoop downward.
Thanks, Art. I hope to be on the water by fall..... if not sooner. Just in time for hurricane season.
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Old 02-11-2016, 10:53 AM   #53
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... but living in a cave (as with most of the monohulls) and tripping all over the rigging (shrouds, stays, winches, etc.) would drive me crazy. (Crazier?) All that pesky "heeling" on a monohull is also problematic for us...

-Chris

Is it really that bad?
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Old 02-11-2016, 11:02 AM   #54
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syd

Here's a link to many South East U.S. marine sales I pulled out o' da hat fer ya. YachtWorld.com Boats and Yachts for Sale

855 boats (85 pages, 10 boats each) on YachtWorld...

30'to 45' / $20K to $50K / power and sail. Largest boats first, then size trickles down to the smaller ones. Scroll baby - Scroll!!

Good Luck!

Happy Boat-Search Daze!! - Art
This is really going to be helpful, Art. Part of the problem I'm finding when searching for boats is having grown up in the midwest, I don't know what makes of boats to search for that fit my needs. I've been looking at Gulfstars and Bayliners and like what I've seen. There are several of them in the 29' to 32' boats in the low $20k to mid $30k range that are not too big or too small for a single guy.
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Old 02-11-2016, 11:05 AM   #55
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Is it really that bad?
It is to a trawler owner. It isn't to someone who has always been on sailboats. It's just a big difference. Narrow, whether monohull or one side of a cat, just isn't conducive to a spacious feeling.

Also design for speed in a sailboat doesn't make the most comfortable boat at anchor. Sailboats do vary. However, a narrow monohull is going to be a bit roly at anchor.
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Old 02-11-2016, 11:08 AM   #56
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After looking at many of the boats in the YW link provided by Art I'll be amazed if many of them sell at all. Why is it that the majority of them have the worst possible photos of their boats? Don't they want to sell them?

First impressions are everything when it comes to selling something, especially via an ad on the internet, so why people don't take the time to stage their photo shoots is baffling to me. Hell, many of them didn't even take the time to clean the mirrors in the heads or tidy up the galley or even straighten up the berth at all. Simply amazing!
I was thinking the same thing, Diesel Duck. Being a photographer by trade, I know the importance of showing quality photos to sell anything. That's all that people have to rely on in order to proceed in finding out more about the item (boat). It's almost as bad as someone trying to sell a vehicle on Craigslist with NO photos.

Maybe I can earn some extra dough shooting people's yachts that are for sale. When I lived in South Beach, I shot a lot of real estate there for Buy Owner. Same thing with the boats.... just on a smaller scale.
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Old 02-11-2016, 11:10 AM   #57
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Sailboats are great, but on most unless it's a big one the seating is just not comfortable .We bought our trawler and purchased some nice chairs to sit in rather than sitting on something . Big difference .
Something I guess I should consider. Thanks, Marty.
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Old 02-11-2016, 11:17 AM   #58
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It is to a trawler owner. It isn't to someone who has always been on sailboats. It's just a big difference. Narrow, whether monohull or one side of a cat, just isn't conducive to a spacious feeling.

Also design for speed in a sailboat doesn't make the most comfortable boat at anchor. Sailboats do vary. However, a narrow monohull is going to be a bit roly at anchor.
Thanks.

I've been looking closely at the Bayliners and I've noticed that their boats below 32' are gas engines and not diesel. Is there a reason for that?

Is it safe to assume that a boat with a single diesel will need less fuel to move the boat than a twin or is there a trade off in one working harder to move a boat as opposed to twins?
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Old 02-11-2016, 12:47 PM   #59
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every boat I've seen that has an option for single or twin, the twin burns more per hour but does get to the destination a bit faster. many like twins for the redundancy of the engine. Many don't because its twice the maintenance, more fuel, and generally the running gear on a twin is more exposed than that of a single.
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Old 02-11-2016, 01:47 PM   #60
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every boat I've seen that has an option for single or twin, the twin burns more per hour but does get to the destination a bit faster. many like twins for the redundancy of the engine. Many don't because its twice the maintenance, more fuel, and generally the running gear on a twin is more exposed than that of a single.
Regarding your post above about sending engine oil out for inspection, wouldn't a magnet do the same thing? I'm guessing you'd be looking for coolant/water in the oil (milky oil) or metal shavings.

Is it possible to run on one engine? I'm guessing it is and would be great in the case of one engine failing but is it advisable for fuel conservation?
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