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Old 03-08-2011, 07:05 AM   #21
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RE: New Member

Hi Ron,

Good luck in your search. I started here about 2 years ago before purchasing my boat. The advice you'll receive is invaluable.

I looked at 20 boats and bought one very different that what I thought I wanted. That's the fun in taking your time in looking.

But the previous advice in buying the newest boat you can afford is a good one. However finding a well kept older boat can work out for you, but as a boat ages, the cost in time and money go way up.

Best of luck.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:39 AM   #22
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RE: New Member

Welcome aboard, Ron!!! Enjoy your stay!!!
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Old 03-08-2011, 09:31 AM   #23
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RE: New Member

Thanks again, everyone for the replies!
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Old 03-08-2011, 11:10 AM   #24
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RE: New Member

welcome Ron.

i just got into boating last year, didnt do a lot of research, and went on a lot of instinct and normal business experience but got lucky (i think..).

1. Get yourself a good surveyor, he/she is your friend. Yes they cost money but can also save you lots of money in many ways. you can also get a separate engine surveyor.

2. The most expensive parts of a motor boat is the motors or the motor, yes boats typically come with one or two motors. gasoline or diesel driven. generally speaking diesel engines are considered to be more reliable, safer and require less maintenance.
why not just have one engine, if you are not looking for fast cruising, i certainly would..

3. Boat size. Ours is a 38'ft boat with twin engines. in retrospect probably too large for first boat. steering/piloting in and out of berths/mooring/anchoring can be challenging. consider side wind, water currents and parking your new baby between 15ft concrete pillars can be a little intimidating. perhaps 30-34 ft would have been better. keep in mind that the more intimidated you are by the difficulties of boating, the less you will be going out on your boat.

4. this forum hold vast information, use it, read the past threads and you will start learning which boat you are leaning towards.. and have fun.
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Old 03-08-2011, 01:36 PM   #25
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RE: New Member

Welcome aboard Ron. This is a great time to be in the market for a boat. Take your time and look at lots of boats. Have fun!
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Old 03-08-2011, 07:52 PM   #26
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RE: New Member

Quote:
FF wrote:

I am approaching retirement age and looking for a trawler for my wife and I to live aboard for awhile and do the Loop.

Why a "trawler"? There are loads of boats as suitable for slow efficient cruising.
I'll tell you why -- a trawler offers more space and comfort and style than other styles of boats.* For a 36 foot boat, what other style offers more livable space?* Oh yeah, I'm 6' 6" so a cabin cruiser or planing boat just doesn't get it.* I can stand up straight in the aft master cabin of our Monk 36.

*
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:16 PM   #27
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RE: New Member

Woody-
6'6" tall AND twin engines? Are you super man?

I agree though- most bang for your buck to buy and then least amount of $$$ to run. Plus, us Monk 36 owners know that the Monk 36 is actually the best mid-sized trawler ever built anywhere in the world.
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Old 03-08-2011, 08:37 PM   #28
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RE: New Member

Quote:
Woodsong wrote:

Woody-
6'6" tall AND twin engines? Are you super man?

I agree though- most bang for your buck to buy and then least amount of $$$ to run. Plus, us Monk 36 owners know that the Monk 36 is actually the best mid-sized trawler ever built anywhere in the world.
I am so sore from what I call "bilge yoga"
Bending my body down there adjusting the shaft packing glands has been eye opening.* That is why I'm doing all this while I'm still young... reletively.

Reminds me, a set of "stubbies" is the best set of tools you can have.* I thought sockets were all I needed and I was sorely wrong.

*
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Old 03-08-2011, 10:47 PM   #29
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What do you mean by 'stubbies' Woody...? Here in Oz, they are a smallish sized beer bottle.
The latter I have some of - however, maybe I can also do with getting some of your kind....I too find myself muttering more and more often lately when grovelling 'down there' doin' some maint'nance..."I getting too old for this s**t....."
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Old 03-09-2011, 09:50 AM   #30
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RE: New Member

Quote:
Peter B wrote:

What do you mean by 'stubbies' Woody...? Here in Oz, they are a smallish sized beer bottle.

Woody's right. *Stubby ratchets and wrenches don't have much leverage, but they sure save the day in many a tight application, even if you're a contortionist. *I even use the heck out of my knob handled ratchet driver.

*
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Old 03-10-2011, 04:51 AM   #31
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RE: New Member

- a trawler offers more space and comfort and style than other styles of boats. For a 36 foot boat, what other style offers more livable space?

So Safety , seaworthy , sea kindly , handyness , scantlings , equipment , maint , cruise ability , repair record (deck rot) , engine suitability , fuel capacity and hourly burn all take second place to simple volume?

Sounds like your dream boat will be east enough to locate.
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Old 03-10-2011, 05:04 AM   #32
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RE: New Member

Quote:
healhustler wrote:Peter B wrote:

What do you mean by 'stubbies' Woody...? Here in Oz, they are a smallish sized beer bottle.
Woody's right. *Stubby ratchets and wrenches don't have much leverage, but they sure save the day in many a tight application, even if you're a contortionist. *I even use the heck out of my knob handled ratchet driver.
_________________________________________

Ah, thanks healhustler.* Understand now.* Yes, very handy those.* I have a set, but we don't call them stubbies here.


*
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Old 03-10-2011, 05:59 AM   #33
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RE: New Member

" Stubby ratchets and wrenches don't have much leverage, but they sure save the day in many a tight application, even if you're a contortionist."

IF the stubbies work for you , contemplate the small battery powered ratchet head..

These will not have the torque to break free anything , but are great unscrewing LOOONG threads, with no effort.
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Old 03-10-2011, 11:44 AM   #34
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RE: New Member

FF wrote:

"a trawler offers more space and comfort and style than other styles of boats."


Fred, What planet are you from?


I can think of other boats less styleish than a trawler but not many.


Bass boats, Duck boats, Submarines, most ferry boats, most modern Dinghy's


That's about all.
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Old 03-11-2011, 04:01 AM   #35
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RE: New Member

"a trawler offers more space and comfort and style than other styles of boats."



I was quoting the gent that started the question.

For my tastes a Commuter , Herrishoff's ,,STROLLER II is just about right , but seemingly way to tiny for this fellow.
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Old 03-11-2011, 10:28 AM   #36
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RE: New Member

FF,
I love it when you post that picture.



Please don't ever stop.
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Old 03-11-2011, 01:20 PM   #37
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RE: New Member

in non-layman terms, what the scoop on "hull speed" and planing?
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Old 03-11-2011, 07:00 PM   #38
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Per,

In simple terms hull speed is when the front of the wave is at your bow, the sag of the wave in toward the center, and the back of the wave is at your stern.* The stern shouldn't be squatting and the bow should not rise.* The formula for hull speed is 5/7 times the square root of the water line length.* The boat is planing when the water is breaking free and the transom is exposed to the bottom.* The boat is trying to climb over its bow wave.* That is about as simply as I can explain it.* Others will probably have a better description.

*


-- Edited by Moonstruck on Friday 11th of March 2011 08:02:00 PM
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Old 03-11-2011, 07:05 PM   #39
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RE: New Member

Quote:
Moonstruck wrote:

*The formula for hull speed is 5/7 times the square root of the water line length.*
I've always known hull speed described by the formula "1.34 times the square root of the waterline length."



http://www.psychosnail.com/BoatSpeedCalculator.aspx*
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Old 03-11-2011, 07:12 PM   #40
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RE: New Member

Quote:
Moonstruck wrote:

Per,

In simple terms hull speed is when the front of the wave is at your bow, the sag of the wave in toward the center, and the back of the wave is at your stern.* The stern shouldn't be squatting and the bow should not rise.* The formula for hull speed is 5/7 times the square root of the water line length.* The boat is planing when the water is breaking free and the transom is exposed to the bottom.* The boat is trying to climb over its bow wave.* That is about as simply as I can explain it.* Others will probably have a better description.
Don, that's pretty good.* I explain it as the speed at which the drag of water passing by a displacement hull equals the added thrust from prop or sail.* If the boat can't plane adding more horsepower only causes the displacement hull to sink deeper in the water, increasing displacement and drag and negating the added power.* At some point the addition of power simply sails the boat under the water altogether.

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