Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-16-2019, 09:51 PM   #1
Member
 
City: Media, PA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 6
New Guy who's a sailor type

HI

I'm a small boat sailor who has built a small sailing craft and taken part in some Raid-style races with family. I've chartered a few times, but only sailboats. Looking into trawlers because I gotta plan for retirement, and figure out something fun and adventuresome to do with my wife other than just peck away on the laptop.

I attended the Stuart Trawlerfest and gained an appreciation for the lifestyle and the boats while there, and am interested in learning more about diesel engines and boat maintenance.

Thanks for tolerating a newbie, and a blow boater to boot!
__________________
Advertisement

phillysailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2019, 10:40 PM   #2
GFC
Guru
 
GFC's Avatar
 
City: Tri Cities, WA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Beachcomber
Vessel Model: Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 3,317
PS. Welcome to TF. As another former small boat sailor in my teens, I've found these guys and gals on TF are pretty open minded about letting blow boaters who seek forgiveness for their prior sins join the ranks.


Oh, and when they start telling you about the initiation rites that blow boaters have to go through to be full accepted, don't believe 'em. They rites are not all THAT painful
__________________

__________________
Mike and Tina
Beachcomber 1995 Sea Ray 550 Sedan Bridge
GFC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2019, 01:02 AM   #3
Guru
 
Jeff F's Avatar
 
City: London, ON
Country: Canada
Vessel Model: Mainship 34 Original
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 520
Welcome. I go both ways :-)

Question: why do you want a Trawler? Why not a sailboat?
Jeff F is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2019, 10:20 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
firehoser75's Avatar
 
City: Nanaimo
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Pilitak
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 146
Welcome to the "Dark Side".
Up here in the western part of Canada, we call your type (sailors) "rag hangers" and power boaters "stink potters". A large number of us are former "rag hangers" have made the move to the "Dark Side". Other than the pocketbook, (and the painful initiation rites for this forum mentioned above) it has not been too bad
Lots of good info and knowledgeable members on here, just remember that some of the info will not be as good as others (just the nature of the beast).
Enjoy the journey!
Tom
__________________
Tom
Nanaimo, BC
firehoser75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2019, 10:46 AM   #5
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 4,345
Welcome aboard

We jumped from sea kayaks to our current boat, so it's doable.

Suggest getting the operators and maintenance manuals for the engine(s) of your boat, as well as the parts catalogue.

Also, check out this thread on books: Essential Books
__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2019, 10:51 AM   #6
Member
 
City: Media, PA
Country: USA
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff F View Post
Welcome. I go both ways :-)

Question: why do you want a Trawler? Why not a sailboat?
Great question. I think it has to do with deciding how I was going to use the boat. If I wanted to cross oceans, a solid sailboat set up for motor sailing would make the best sense for me. I realized that even on charters when i absolutely LOVED the ability to sail... a Helia 44 for instance, from Ft Lauderdale to KW, I had three days of broad reaching at speed of 9-10.6 kts; but even on those trips I used the motor at least 50% of the time.

This was consonant with the experience of serious cruisers on the interweb, and a cost analysis by Steve Dashew and others pointed out that an efficient motorboat was actually less costly than a similarly capable sailboat. And the forces on the rig are less predictable and potentially more cruise ending than a reliable ICE. The maintenance necessary to keep the skinny stick pointed upwards and the sails drawing full & useful is enjoyable, but a missing cotter pin can end in tears. I am much enamored of efforts like Randy Repass' Wylie 66 which tries to do away with much of the extra hardware yet achieve an awesome exploring vehicle, but you are still limited by the air draft while on the ICW, or from cool nooks and crannies with modest or shallow depth.

So I contemplated Chuck Paine's Steadysailer idea, since it incorporates a tabernacle for canal cruising as brought to life by Ed Joy. But it's a one-off, and I wasn't sure if the paravanes really work with sailing... wouldn't they get in the way?

I really liked the purposeful design and adventuresome intent of these boats, with good engine room access and solid anchoring platforms, forward facing pilothouse and room for dinghy storage and launching. And so slowly I sequed into trawlers, diving deep into issues like keeping fuel clean and bypass oil filters and preventing scaling. I realized that as much as I enjoy tweaking sails and anticipating wind shifts, I could enjoy mechanical design prevention as art, enabling the routine maintenance that would prevent a cruise-limiting event, while providing greater freedom of route planning.

And what do I want to DO with the boat? Well, my wife and I are at the peak of our careers, just a few years and we will have funded our kids' education and paid off our primary dwelling with ample reserves. We'd love to have access to water while winding down and retiring, but have never strongly considered purchasing a beach house... we are peripatetic tourists, enjoying change of scenery and new towns. We spent a week in Charleston, ostensibly for a running race, and took tours, ate meals and learned so much that we knew we wouldn't want to go back there again that quickly. We'd much rather recreate that experience in another area.

Boats with the ability to carry bikes and dinghies are a great way to do that, so I started researching the Great Loop. Warm waters in the winter and NE tours in the summer? Sounds ideal for a few years.

Long winded answers are my style, apparently. But that's how my process got me here.
phillysailor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2019, 10:59 AM   #7
Guru
 
psneeld's Avatar
 
City: Avalon, NJ
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Albin 40
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 18,528
The first thing about moving to trawlers is don't consider it the dark side but the "enlightened" side and beware of those that do.


And yes many of us came from sailing backgrounds, still love sailing.


More than a few us think pound for pound, a lot of sailors are lousy at knowing boating ettiquette and the rules just Ike they think power boats are the dark side.
psneeld is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2019, 01:17 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
firehoser75's Avatar
 
City: Nanaimo
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Pilitak
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
The first thing about moving to trawlers is don't consider it the dark side but the "enlightened" side and beware of those that do.


And yes many of us came from sailing backgrounds, still love sailing.


More than a few us think pound for pound, a lot of sailors are lousy at knowing boating ettiquette and the rules just Ike they think power boats are the dark side.
Psneeld,
Good thing I have thick skin, or I would think you might have aimed those comments at me Sometimes it is hard to read in the humour that the author intended.
Anyway, I too miss a good sail. However, if I am totally honest, in our cruising area, due to having to time currents (rapids), light summer winds, winds from the "wrong" direction, etc. we really didn't get the sails up and have a good sail (boat speed over 4 knots) all that often so we are not missing that much in the long run. It is just great to be out on the water enjoying boating.

As far as poor boating ettiquette, I have found that exists on both sides of the leger and is really more about the individual than it is about the type or even brand of boat.
__________________
Tom
Nanaimo, BC
firehoser75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2019, 01:23 PM   #9
Guru
 
Comodave's Avatar
 
City: Au Gres, MI
Country: US
Vessel Name: Never Say Never
Vessel Model: President 41 DC
Join Date: Jul 2015
Posts: 3,200
Welcome aboard.
Comodave is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2019, 02:33 PM   #10
Guru
 
Jeff F's Avatar
 
City: London, ON
Country: Canada
Vessel Model: Mainship 34 Original
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 520
Quote:
Originally Posted by phillysailor View Post

I think it has to do with deciding how I was going to use the boat...
Can't argue with any of that! I've been having lots of fun recently exploring Florida and the gulf coast in my 3' draft power boat. Last time I cruised this area it was in a sailboat with 6' draft and a 50' mast, and much of my time traveling was under power. The sailboat really didn't fit the use case. It sounds like you've thought through your needs pretty well.
__________________

Jeff F is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:31 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012