Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-19-2015, 06:47 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Blissboat's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville Beach, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Shallow Minded
Vessel Model: Shoal Cat
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 411
More greetings from Jacksonville

Hello, All: The TF has interested me for some time. Now that I am seriously in the market for a cruising motor yacht, it seems I should stick my oar in here, where I have already (and appreciatively) read so many informative posts.

I'm fairly experienced as a sailor, powerboat, and former licensed captain of passenger vessels. Presently I just day cruise my 18' power catamaran, a locally-built center console called a Shoal Cat. I like trailering it to destinations, there to launch and explore. My intent with a larger vessel is to opportunistically cruise the Atlantic ICW, based from here in Jacksonville, and to make the Loop when time and finances permit.

Target vessel parameters: 36' to 45' feet, single diesel, fiberglass, steel, aluminum, or anything else that isn't wood (been there). Prefer a split-cabin arrangement, for two-couple privacy & sanity, but a Europa-style isn't out of the question. Price: under $100K - preferably well under! For my money, a boat should be 1) safe, 2) reliable, 3) efficient, and 4) good-looking.

A trawler-style vessel seems the obvious candidate. For years, I've lusted after various Grand Banks "trawlers." I concede that GBs are not, strictly speaking trawlers - an interesting discussion in its own right. Whatever I wind up with, I plan to run at trawler-style speeds, e.g., around 8 knots. Displacement hull or semi-displacement, I value efficiency, by which I mean economy of operation.

I've come to learn with disappointment how many problems older GBs have developed. Those safe, handsome teak decks, for example, seem to have endowed the marque with leaks. And those seemingly robust steel fuel tanks, I now view with suspicion of rust. Blisters are apparently endemic to all fiberglass boats. Marine Traders seem to represent a lot of yacht for the money, but they have similar issues as older GBs, without the benefit of the high quality original construction and components.

That's where I'm at, geographically and otherwise. I'm glad to join this company of salty ladies and gentlemen, and I look forward to learning and contributing.
__________________
Advertisement

Blissboat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-19-2015, 08:22 PM   #2
Guru
 
Steve's Avatar
 
City: Thibodaux, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gumbo
Vessel Model: 2003 Monk 36
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,607
Welcome! We are very happy with our Monk 36, two cabins, heads, single engine and fiberglass decks, might be of interest to you.
__________________

__________________
Steve W.
http://mvgumbo.blogspot.com/
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2015, 11:34 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Blissboat's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville Beach, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Shallow Minded
Vessel Model: Shoal Cat
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 411
That's a nice photo of your Monk, Steve. Shows off her attractive sheer and flared bow to good advantage. Not long ago I went through a Monk 36 for sale for around $100K. Like those fiberglass decks! This one had a four-cylinder Cummins, reportedly 150hp, which ought to be plenty. I appreciated the ample space in the engine compartment. Have seen other examples asking as low as the mid $80K range.
Blissboat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2015, 02:09 AM   #4
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blissboat View Post
That's a nice photo of your Monk, Steve. Shows off her attractive sheer and flared bow to good advantage. Not long ago I went through a Monk 36 for sale for around $100K. Like those fiberglass decks! This one had a four-cylinder Cummins, reportedly 150hp, which ought to be plenty. I appreciated the ample space in the engine compartment. Have seen other examples asking as low as the mid $80K range.
There are a lot of ways to go. A couple of boats that have fewer of the type problems you describe are sort of at the opposite end of the original price range. That is Bayliner and Hatteras. You can find a lot of 90's Bayliners in your range. As they were built functional but basic without the extra teak and without steel fuel tanks, those are two issues you won't encounter. Plus their pricing allows you newer than you might get in some boats. Hatteras you'll have to go older but there are many Hatteras MY's that will fit your needs and are without major issues.

The one place both Bayliner and Hatteras will fail your objectives is that they'll be twins. But they still can be operated economically, just not as much so as a single.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2015, 10:47 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
Blissboat's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville Beach, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Shallow Minded
Vessel Model: Shoal Cat
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 411
Good thoughts, BandB, and both marques you name are worth considering - Hatteras, especially, having a strong reputation for build quality. They hold their value for a reason.

About the single vs. twin preference: Economy of operation is one factor. Others include better protection for the running gear (I like exploring skinny water!), and better access to the engine in a confined engine compartment.

The more space there is to work in the engine room, the more likely you'll spend time there. The more time you spend there, the more familiar you become with your systems, and the sooner you'll notice little things that want attention. If fluid starts leaking, you'll notice it, wipe it up, and look for the reason. If a fastener is developing corrosion, you'll reach for the emery cloth and WD-40. If there's a place to sit down, open a manual, and set out some tools and parts, you're likely to attempt those various small maintenance jobs that need doing.

Folk wisdom along the waterfront holds that single-engine boats are better maintained (in the engine room, at least) because their owners are more dependent on that one engine. Makes sense, but I think it also has to do with access. An owner who is comfortable in the engine room is likely to pay greater attention to what happens there. That's as opposed to the captain who gets in, gets out, and calls a mechanic when something breaks down in a tight corner. I mean no disrespect to those skippers, and besides - honest mechanics need the work!
Blissboat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2015, 11:05 AM   #6
TF Site Team
 
dimer2's Avatar
 
City: Houston
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Baobab
Vessel Model: Bayliner 4788
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 2,193
" Others include better protection for the running gear (I like exploring skinny water!), "


Just remember that the protection normally has a price of at least 12" of keel. I have a single which drafts 4'8" and a larger twin which draws 3'6".
__________________
No one who achieves success does so without acknowledging the help of others.
dimer2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2015, 12:04 PM   #7
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by dimer2 View Post
" Others include better protection for the running gear (I like exploring skinny water!), "


Just remember that the protection normally has a price of at least 12" of keel. I have a single which drafts 4'8" and a larger twin which draws 3'6".
I don't buy the better protection bit either as it varies from boat to boat. Hatteras generally is well protected and on the same boat singles have greater draft so that creates a disadvantage.
BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-20-2015, 12:15 PM   #8
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 13,171
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blissboat View Post

Folk wisdom along the waterfront holds that single-engine boats are better maintained (in the engine room, at least) because their owners are more dependent on that one engine. Makes sense, but I think it also has to do with access. An owner who is comfortable in the engine room is likely to pay greater attention to what happens there. That's as opposed to the captain who gets in, gets out, and calls a mechanic when something breaks down in a tight corner. I mean no disrespect to those skippers, and besides - honest mechanics need the work!
"Folk Wisdom". An oxymoron perhaps?

I so dislike statements that just take a broad brush stroke but hold no real support behind them. I find zero basis for saying single engine boats are better maintained. Twin engine owners don't just say, "oh I've got a spare engine so I won't change the oil."

As to space in an engine room it varies boat to boat. A 60' Hatteras MY with twins is more easily serviced than some smaller boats with singles. Don't buy old wife's or old sailor's tales. Examine and evaluate yourself. Also with twins properly placed much of your work and access is done from the deepest part of the boat so often you have greater headroom. Evaluate each boat on it's on merits.

The one great advantage of singles is cost. Cost at original purchase, cost of operation. And the big item of cost isn't the fuel, but is simply twice the number of engines to maintain. Twice as much to go wrong.
__________________

BandB is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012