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Old 07-02-2014, 10:24 AM   #1
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City: New Orleans
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Hi from New Orleans

I am fairly certain that in the next 12 months I will be purchasing a trawler in the 34 to 44 foot range, likely a boat that is ten years old or newer. I have been steered toward a single engine vessel with at minimum a bow thruster. I am interested in a live-aboard situation for about three or four nights per week. My situation is that I work in New Orleans, and have a second residence presently along the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Since my wife is retired and I am likely about seven or eight years from retirement, the plan is to live aboard the boat while in New Orleans (the New Orleans residence will be sold.) and to reside in Mississippi on weekends and, after retirement, permanently.
We figured we could start enjoying the boat for recreation presently and, after retirement, traveling in the vessel when not in Mississippi.
I joined this forum so I would have access to the several threads to help me research potential vessels. I have enjoyed the different topics and I consider the information extremely valuable.
My greatest concern is hurricanes. I have enjoyed all the advice and really would appreciate any suggestions from folks living along the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts.
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Old 07-02-2014, 10:53 AM   #2
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City: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Country: U.S.A.
Vessel Name: Old School
Vessel Model: 38' Trawler custom built by Hike Metal Products
Join Date: Dec 2007
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Hurricane season is upon us; I hate it but it goes w/ the territory. I live in Baton Rouge but keep my boat on the Tickfaw River which flows into Lake Maurepas, then into Lake Ponchartrain. Good luck w/ the search, make sure it's air conditioned if you plan on living on it. Mine is not, which limits my overnights to October to May.
Mike
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Old 07-02-2014, 11:16 AM   #3
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City: Gulf Shores, Ala.
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Vessel Name: Ulysses
Vessel Model: Romsdal 1963
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Advice on Hurricanes- stay with the boat. Run it away to the west or north. If you don't have time to make it out and around the Rigolets then go up to Madisonville and up the Tchefuncte. I believe that over 90% of boat damage during hurricanes is due to leaving them unattended- no one checking the lines down or in due to surge. Stay away from potential flying debris sites- lumber yards, scrap yards, etc... They have effectively cut off the surge potential from MRGO by means of a new sea wall and gates. If you have the time take it up the Port Allen Route and get behind (upstream) of the Bayou Sorrell locks. Pre-plan and hope for the best.
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Old 07-02-2014, 03:30 PM   #4
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City: New Orleans
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Great advice

Thanks so much for the input. I was wondering about possible inland escape routes. This is great information and serves to relieve some of my anxiety.
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Old 07-02-2014, 09:00 PM   #5
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City: Thibodaux, Louisiana
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Vessel Name: Gumbo
Vessel Model: 2003 Monk 36
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Welcome! I live in Thibodaux I keep my Monk 36 in Houma. My slip is in a small canal about a 1/4 mile off of the ICW. quite protected from wind and tides. As has been mentioned in earlier posts there are lots of creeks or rivers off Lakes Potchartrain or Maurepas.
We are very happy with our 2003 Monk which is a single with bow thruster. We bought her in Annapolis in 2008 and brought her home down the ICW, across Okeechobee, and along the Gulf Coast to Houma. If you have any questions feel free to send a private message to my profile page.
Steve W.
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Old 07-02-2014, 10:58 PM   #6
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Thanks, Steve

Thank you, Steve.
I am sure I will be contacting you in the future. I am excited about the prospect of getting the boat, but naturally nervous about a few things. I guess that's what makes this exciting.
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Old 07-03-2014, 06:55 AM   #7
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Steve: visited Houma's City Dock a couple of months ago. Very nice.

Another reason or two to stay on your boat during a storm is that you will probably have electricity, ample water, and adult beverages.
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Old 07-03-2014, 06:16 PM   #8
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now you're talking my language

Yes. Baking on dry land after the power stays off for weeks is no fun.
So I need to make sure I have plenty fuel, food, water...and beer, wine or other spirits.
I worked on a merchant ship one summer years ago and these were the required stores. But that was before the Exxon Valdez.
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Old 07-04-2014, 01:46 AM   #9
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I have a different view about staying aboard during a hurricane. A man I knew put his boat up a narrow channel and spider webbed it between the mangroves. He and another guy decided to stay aboard to protect his boat. They found his remains some years later in the mangroves. The boat suffered minor damage. His friend said he had gone out to secure a loose transom door and never came back in.

Get the boat inland as far as you can. Tie it up the best you can. Get your ass to shelter.
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Old 07-04-2014, 03:34 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HopCar View Post
I have a different view about staying aboard during a hurricane. A man I knew put his boat up a narrow channel and spider webbed it between the mangroves. He and another guy decided to stay aboard to protect his boat. They found his remains some years later in the mangroves. The boat suffered minor damage. His friend said he had gone out to secure a loose transom door and never came back in.

Get the boat inland as far as you can. Tie it up the best you can. Get your ass to shelter.
I share your view. The boat is far far far far far less important than a life.

I also find it somewhat ironic that a person who lives in New Orleans is worried about hurricanes in regards to his potential boat. Same ones you encounter on land. If we're going to live in coastal areas, we have that risk. One just stays abreast of forecasts, takes steps when appropriate, and carries insurance.
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