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Old 08-29-2013, 08:07 AM   #21
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Since I'm so late to boating I don't have time to learn from mistakes so I really appreciate the information and advice from experienced boaters. I've definitely come to the right place and I have many more questions to come.

Naw, there's always plenty of time for making mistakes you can learn from!



-Chris
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Old 08-29-2013, 08:42 AM   #22
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Everybody keeps thinking the Albin 28 he is mentioningis some sort of semi-planing trawler type boat. It is not. It is an express cruiser with a planing hull and a 315hp Diesel engine and cruises at 18ish knots.

Now.......I was planning on doing a full write up on something like this since I just bought a Carver....but I don't have time to write it now.

But I will say something that nobody has mentioned. Most "cruisers" you speak are made right here in the USA. I am not going on a patriotic angle here. I am talking ENGINEERING!!! As I poke around my Carver I begin to realize that the people in Wisconsin that made this boat actually had a brain and a little bit of forethought. All access panels are big enough to remove/replace whatever it is you are "accessing". Even the companionway door is big enough to get the engines out.

Oh, and get this.........NO WINDOW LEAKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Can you imagine that????!!!!! No rotted stain interior wood. Anyway, I had low expectations going into this and I am pleasantly surprised at every turn. OH....wait.....you mean I can pick up the phone and call someone and order a part.....from the same maderfackers that built this thing?????!!!!!!! YOU GOTTA BE KIDDING!!!! Or they can at least give me a phone number to the people that supplied the part. They have a website with a list of vendors so sometimes I don't even have to bother those maderfackers!!!!

Anyway, just a few thoughts that people don't think about.........
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Old 08-29-2013, 02:31 PM   #23
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Everybody keeps thinking the Albin 28 he is mentioningis some sort of semi-planing trawler type boat. It is not. It is an express cruiser with a planing hull and a 315hp Diesel engine and cruises at 18ish knots.

Fair point. 18 kts cruise seems a bit enthusiastic (not a disagreement, just skeptical). In any case, while many of the larger Albins are powered with lower horsepower and run at lower speeds, the newer 28's will go faster than a typical semi-displacement boat.

The TE models (that'd be "Tournament Express") are designed to appeal to fishermen who feel the need to get there quickly, and get their fish checked in before closing... so yep, they've got more horsepower and yep, they'll plane.

That said, planing at 15 kts in a boat with full keel and skeg -- and using relatively serious torque to do it -- isn't the same as planing at maybe 25 kts on a V-hull.

We could "plane" our Mainship III, at WOT -- hard chines, full keel, single diesel -- and it was pretty much like running a plow through the water.

I'd say the description is a maybe matter of degree... or a continuum... that transitions from semi-displacement to semi-planning... and almost anything with hard chines will plane eventually, given enough horsepower.

They used to say the F4 was an example of making almost anything fly... given enough horsepower.

All this is not a criticism of the Albin, BTW. I think they offer many advantages.

-Chris
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Old 08-29-2013, 02:59 PM   #24
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Albin 28 TE if that's what he is talking about..

"Albin 28 is a true delight to handle in any weather. She has a speed range of 20 to 28 knots, depending on the engine."

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...g_id=59909&url=
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Old 08-29-2013, 03:31 PM   #25
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1. Buy your second boat first. By that I mean do your homework, find the right boat, and don't settle for a boat that's too small just because it has an attractive price.
That is some of the best advice I've heard in a while! Well said.
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Old 08-29-2013, 03:48 PM   #26
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Albin 28 TE if that's what he is talking about..

"Albin 28 is a true delight to handle in any weather. She has a speed range of 20 to 28 knots, depending on the engine."

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...g_id=59909&url=

Yep, probably is. I'm not really disputing... but the owner of the 28 the next dock over from us doesn't make his sound like a speed demon.

Nice boat, in any case... although I'm surprised he seems to need the bowthruster as much as he does. Even when leaving the slip...

The other Albin here is one of the "command bridge" models, 36' or so (I think), seems to be an even more sedate boat. Looks like an interesting layout.

-Chris
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Old 08-29-2013, 04:19 PM   #27
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Even,

Don't listen to those Sea Ray (basement boats) snobs!!

OK just kidding as I am still (technically) a Sea Ray owner. Do as I did, visit Yachtworld (a lot) and start looking at boats on line, then attend a few of the big boat shows and walk the different style of boats. I started with a 30' Sea Ray and I am now graduating up to a 48 footer. I, like you am retiring soon and the wife and I plan to live aboard and cruise the west coast.

Best advice as stated by others, take it slow, do your research and the style, length etc., will reveal itself to you. Welcome and good luck in your search.
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:36 PM   #28
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... although I'm surprised he seems to need the bow thruster as much as he does. Even when leaving the slip...
I do the same thing when leaving the slip. The bow thruster allows me to keep the boat in the middle of the slip so as not to rub the hull do to prop walk . I put my fenders up before leaving the slip.
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Old 08-29-2013, 05:38 PM   #29
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You're right Baker, the Albin 28 mentioned is a full on planing boat, although much different from many other express cruisers. The Albin deep vee hull is much more similar to a Bertram 28 than a Carver or Regal.


A deep vee planing hull is one way to tackle 4+ ft of messy chop. The other way is a well designed full displacement hull. They both do the job in a different manner.

What doesn't work so well are the flat bottomed, planing hulls boats designed for skiing and going fast, or the hard chined semi displacement hulls which are built for maximum internal volume.

All boat designs are a compromise. Its just a matter of deciding on your priorities and finding a boat that has the same priorities.
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Old 08-29-2013, 06:06 PM   #30
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I do the same thing when leaving the slip. The bow thruster allows me to keep the boat in the middle of the slip so as not to rub the hull do to prop walk . I put my fenders up before leaving the slip.
I do to (the thruster) to keep bow evenly between the fingers and/or to put an angle on the boat to counter prop walk, or to push off the side of a single finger. I don't, however, take in the fenders until out of the berth.

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Old 08-29-2013, 08:54 PM   #31
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Back in the 80's I had a 30' Wellcraft that I called a cabin cruiser. The insurance company called it a "yacht" and charged me appropriately. Anyway, single gas MerCruiser engine I/O. It's get up on plane and skipped across the water, sucking down gas like it was a buck 30 a gallon. Smallish cabin that could sleep 6 if you lacked the sense of hearing and smell, 4 was the better number, two was preferred. But it had all the amenities, head, galley, etc. I wouldn't call that a trawler by any means. That was back when I was young and stupid, now I'm older. Anyway, the kids liked staying on it. They had their own room" (the aft cabin/bunk).

So to me, a "cruiser" is going to be faster & bouncier, and have less room than a trawler which will be slower and rollier.
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