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Old 03-09-2015, 08:25 PM   #41
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For the purposes of discussion, it might help to refer to the Bonanza tails as V tail and conventional tail. A T tail describes a tailfeather configuration not incorporated in the Bonanza line.

V Tail



Conventional Tail:



T Tail:

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Old 03-09-2015, 09:39 PM   #42
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Sunchaser,

FlyWright's post perfectly describes how I failed to answer your question. I'll try again, this time assuming that you meant "conventional" tail instead of "T" tail.


-Model 35 was built between 1947 and 1982. All had V-tails, but cordwise dimension of the tail surfaces grew has horsepower and weight was increased over the years. Also, the angle formed by the tail (the V) was increased at some point. All the V tail aircraft share the same fuselage and wing dimensions.

-Model 33 (1959 to 1994) was virtually the same as the 35 but with a conventional tail. The consensus is that at similar weight and horsepower, there is little difference in flying qualities between the two. The V tail might do "the boogie" a touch more and might be a tad faster. The conventional tail has a slightly larger CG envelope.

-Model 36 (1968 to present) featured a longer fuselage that added considerably to the longitudinal stability. It still wiggles in turbulence but not nearly as much as any of the short fuselage models.

For comparisons of tail types, it is best to use the 35 and 33. The 36's longer fuselage affects things far more than tail type - making it a poor comparable.

Unfortunately, Beech did not build the best (in my opinion) Bonanza. That would be a conventional, STRAIT tailed version. They had all the nessecarry pieces in production on other planes but thier marketing department demanded the "jet like" SWEPT tail for the 1959 model 33 (the Boeing 707 had just come on line and the world was going bonkers over jets and rockets. Consider the uselessness of tail fins on cars of the period).

Here's a Beech T 34 sporting a proper tail
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Old 03-12-2015, 08:54 PM   #43
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Soloed in a C-140, and they remain my fav.
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Old 06-08-2015, 10:55 AM   #44
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Mooney M20 for me. Great combination of speed and efficiency, and not near as small as people make them out to be. They are a bit of a task to get into, especially as I keep adding on the years to my body.
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Old 06-08-2015, 12:03 PM   #45
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Mooney M20 for me. Great combination of speed and efficiency, and not near as small as people make them out to be. They are a bit of a task to get into, especially as I keep adding on the years to my body.
Loved those planes, Jacks88! I used to pick up 201s and 231s from the factory in the late 70s/early 80s and deliver them to our dealership near Phoenix, AZ. Each plane was equipped to the gills with autopilot and radios, including the KNS880 Rnav. That was the old one where you made a waypoint based upon a VOR's radial/distance and could run straight line direct courses to your destination. A far cry from our mapping GPS today, but cutting edge at the time. They were great airplanes...very efficient and FAST!!! The Ray Lopresti aerodynamic design enhancements were significant!

I always loved the semi-reclined flying position on that plane. Once I slipped into it, it fit like a glove. Tough plane to join the Mile High Club in though!
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Old 06-08-2015, 12:12 PM   #46
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Real men fly taildraggers, I owned five Maules of various models, not all at once of course, great machines. Much cheaper than owning a boat.
Real men fly helicopters....

Sightseers and travelers fly airplanes...well...some bush pilots earn their wings if they stay out of low passes and stop scaring the helo guys...
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Old 06-08-2015, 01:35 PM   #47
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If it makes you feel better about yourself, keep telling yourself that.

I've known "real men" who fly and real men who never stepped foot on a plane or helicopter. It's not the aircraft that makes the man.
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Old 06-08-2015, 02:58 PM   #48
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I once had dreams of swapping the Mooney for a Cessna 337. I remember watching some video of a Maule being flown out of a hanger, cool stuff.
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Old 06-09-2015, 02:51 AM   #49
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I taught myself to fly in ultralights. I got my license in Cessnas so I bought a 172. But every once in a while I would rent a Grumman Cheetah. That was a fun plane to fly.
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Old 06-09-2015, 08:42 PM   #50
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1965; LIFE magazine had a $5 coupon for an introductory flight. I went to the local seaplane base, scared myself to death & was hooked. Flew the C172 on floats all up & down the Seattle/PNW coast until deployed. came back in due time & got back to flying. Loved the D18 Beech; veeery educational plane to fly at times. Lots of Citabria time. American Yankees & Grumman variants ere fun as well. Favorite planes? The Rockwell twin engine Commanders; 500, 560 Piston engine & 680 thru 1000 series turbines.
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Old 06-09-2015, 09:08 PM   #51
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Those Grumman singles were a kick in the pants. I started with the TR2/Yankee but got to fly the Traveler, Cheetah and Tiger. Loved the Tiger!
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Old 06-09-2015, 10:21 PM   #52
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Learned to fly and soloed in a 152.

I've has the good fortune to have flown paper pipers, radial beavers, an old twin piper and got a little stick time in a Frisbee (Hughes 300c).

With the exception of the piper and the 152, all were owned by my leo agency. Loved every minute of it, but job and family got in the way.
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Old 07-09-2015, 10:29 PM   #53
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Learned to fly in a 172. Great plane. Did my xcounties in an Piper Archer III. Was a lot of fun and got you there quickly.
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Old 07-09-2015, 11:22 PM   #54
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Piper Cherokee, 180, c172, c182, skylane, c182rg, c310, Piper arrow, Seneca, Cherokee 6(260 & 300), lance and one memorable flight, my last flight as PIC, in a brand new Cirrus from STT to Anegada BVI. I might have forgotten a few, owned only the Cherokee 6s, Seneca, and Lance. Really enjoyed that Lance. Talk about a truck, used to fly in and out of a grass strip with loads of bluestone pavers and shrubs. Don't ask! never an anchor though!
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Old 07-23-2015, 03:58 AM   #55
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Nothing wrong with Cessna's. I've flown most of the singles with the 206 probably the favorite and most of the 400 series twins with the 406 my favorite Cessna twin. The 414 was a nice little machine if you only had 3 or 4 passengers but could have used a bit more horsepower.
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