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Old 02-10-2013, 06:27 PM   #1
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That's the worst boat name I've ever heard of.
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Old 02-10-2013, 06:44 PM   #2
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A trivia question. My sister, in speaking of the possibility of their bringing their trawler from Wilmington to Charleston in April, is saying "we will try and bring the XXX down in April." I maintain that it should properly be phrased as "we will bring XXX down in April." Which of us is correct? And why?

John
Both can be correct, except in the first "and" should be "to", the "try" is "to bring" the boat, not something separate and additional.
The first denotes an attempt is being made with uncertainty of success, (though whether that was intended is anyone`s guess). The second indicates certainty the "bringing down" will happen, with no qualification.
It is too long since I studied English sentence construction, and parsing,to explain reasoning further.
Later we can progress to various ways of pronouncing the word "pedant".
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Old 02-10-2013, 06:57 PM   #3
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Rwidman wrote:

"That's the worst boat name I've ever heard of.".
.
Well, I suppose that I could make up something about what triple-X might mean, but in this case it merely means that I did not use the actual name of the boat.

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Old 02-10-2013, 07:02 PM   #4
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Lol. There are some boats we know that we always refer to as "the" whatever and some we don't. Can't tell you why. For instance, seabiscuit versus "the" Ada Helen. I guess we use the "the" on Ada Helen because otherwise it sounds like you're talking about a lady and not a boat??? Is xxx named after a person?
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:03 PM   #5
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BruceK wrote:

"Both can be correct, except in the first "and" should be "to", the "try" is "to bring" the boat, not something separate and additional."

You need to understand that in the U.S. "Southern English" does not necessarily follow the rules. For better or worse (mostly worse) it is different. Blame it all on the Scotch. (Not the drink -- the racial group, who came over here early on and established themselves in the southeast).
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:13 PM   #6
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BruceK wrote:

"Both can be correct, except in the first "and" should be "to", the "try" is "to bring" the boat, not something separate and additional."

You need to understand that in the U.S. "Southern English" does not necessarily follow the rules.
Language is fluid and ever evolving. Plenty of people here would use "and" instead of "to" in that instance. To me it is grammatically wrong, but accepted expression, so people understand each other, is what matters.
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:27 PM   #7
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The first statement is a polite NO from a southerner.
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Old 02-10-2013, 07:36 PM   #8
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Wilmington, DE or Wilmington, NC? And, since the word has been mentioned - pedant... The "racial group?" were Scots, not the drink Scotch...
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Old 02-10-2013, 08:24 PM   #9
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"The Glenlivet" or "Bowmore"? Both go down well.
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Old 02-11-2013, 07:55 AM   #10
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They're not coming down.
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:06 AM   #11
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I think they were Scots/Irish and they don't go down easily at all.
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:47 AM   #12
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... The "racial group?" were Scots, not the drink Scotch...
I don't think "Scots" would be classified as a racial group. Ethnic group perhaps, but not racial.
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Old 02-11-2013, 10:55 AM   #13
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I don't think "Scots" would be classified as a racial group. Ethnic group perhaps, but not racial.
The Romans inserted some DNA when they conquered us. Wonder what we really are now?
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:05 AM   #14
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It's "up to Charleston" as longitude is increasing..opposite of "Downeast Maine"

If you are just trying to needle her...I would tell her that she'll never make it all the way because she insulted her boat.
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:05 PM   #15
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Just to clarify a post - I didn't name the Scots a "racial group." Poster number 6 did. I was merely pointing out his misuse of Scots/Scotch.... gotta love some of these posts - they travel so far, so fast, and so.....
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Old 02-11-2013, 01:25 PM   #16
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This is becoming complicated...
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:20 PM   #17
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Just to clarify a post - I didn't name the Scots a "racial group." Poster number 6 did. I was merely pointing out his misuse of Scots/Scotch.... gotta love some of these posts - they travel so far, so fast, and so.....
Yes you were. I responded to your post because I didn't want to quote the misuse of the word "Scotch".
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:03 PM   #18
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With regards to putting a "the" in front of a vessel's name I think it's most common not to. But depending on the rest of the sentence structure, it may be more natural to include a "the," particularly if the sentence is being spoken, simply because it flows better.

We do not put a "the" in front of La Perouse in writing or speech. But some names lend themselves to a "the" better than others. "I'm going out on Nimitz" is probably the more "correct" sentence structure, but the easier to say and probably the more common structure is 'I'm going out on the Nimitz."

While I have not made any sort of study of this, it seems to me that vessel names that are made up of two or more words tend to be used without a "the" where single word names often tend to be used with a "the."

"The battle between the Monitor and the Merrimac." "Gertrude L. Thebaud almost won the International Fisherman's Race against the Bluenose."

So I don't know. There probably is a "rule" somewhere but I don't know what it is. So I just say and write what flows the best in the sentence.
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