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Old 05-10-2015, 06:48 AM   #1
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Mind Shift?

This is about houses , but it captures the shift in thinking since the recession .

What changes will this mind shift bring to boats?

The Walk-In Closet Is the New Outdoor Kitchen: The Most (and Least) Likely Features in New Homes Today

Real Estate News |
May 8, 2015 |
By: Rachel Stults

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If you’ve been dreaming about that brand-new house with the outdoor kitchen, the two-story foyer, and the luxurious master bathroom, complete with a whirlpool tub—well, good luck finding one.
In prerecession times, developers had wrested such sexy amenities from the realm of luxury building into the everyman’s (and woman’s) home. But today? Homebuilders across the nation have decided to , cutting out those kinds of features in favor of efficient, organized, and pragmatic ones.
“Ten years ago we were talking about outdoor kitchens with a fancy wine rack,” says Stephen Melman, director of economic services at the National Association of Home Builders. “Now we’re talking about a closet. It’s not sexy, but that’s what people want.”
The NAHB surveyed nearly 400 builders earlier this year about the features they were most and least likely to include in homes and communities in 2015. In addition to outdoor kitchens, outdoor fireplaces, sunrooms, main-level carpeting, and media rooms are on the decline. On the rise: walk-in closets, laundry rooms, energy-efficient windows and appliances, and programmable thermostats—yes, there is a green theme. It’s all about efficiency, both of time and resources.
“If a working couple is trying to get out of the house in the morning, they need a walk-in closet in the master bedroom, they need a laundry room that’s well-lit and well-organized,” Melman says. “That’s how they improve the efficiency of the household, find clothes, get organized, and hide the clutter. Do they need a whirlpool or do they need a walk-in closet with a skylight?”
Melman says that even as the economy (at least in some sectors) continues to improve, buyers are fixated on comfort and affordability. It’s part of a postrecession cultural shift toward pragmatism. We’re not settling; we’ve merely changed our expectations for new homes, and homebuilders have adjusted their creations accordingly, appealing to a segment that’s willing to forgo a two-story foyer or family room to get a better price.
According to a Pew Research survey (released in 2010, at the tail end of the recession), more than 62% of Americans said they had cut back on spending since the recession began, and 31% said they’d continue to hold down their spending even after the economy improved.
This is especially true among first-time home buyers, many of whom are millennials.
“As first-time buyers, they are unlikely to opt for elaborate outdoor features when they are scraping to come up with a down payment,” Melman says.
Their list of most and least likely features does offer a few surprises; it’s not all about the decline of luxury. Once a high-end item, granite countertops are now more popular than laminate. Builders are swapping the two-story family room for a great room. Specialty spots such as media rooms or sunrooms are being replaced by spaces that are more flexible, Melman says, especially additional bedrooms. And communities with jogging and walking trails, previously coveted, are now less popular than a two-car garage. The cost of the land, Melman says, is just too high.
Yet just because these features are less common doesn’t mean you can’t get your hands on a house that includes them. All you have to do is spend more money. In places with weaker markets, you might see such features built into homes priced above $500,000. In places such as San Francisco or New York, you might get an apartment barely larger than a walk-in closet for that amount.
Features such as outdoor kitchens have slipped back into the province of the luxury buyer; you’ll still see them in high-end homes, but your average home buyers will have to be content with their Weber grill.
Below you’ll find ranked lists of most and least likely features to be included in a new home, plus those that remain perennial. The builders graded each feature on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 means “not at all likely to include” and 5 means “definitely will include.”






Features least likely to be found in new homes and communities

1. Outdoor kitchen
2. Laminate countertop
3. Outdoor fireplace
4. Sunroom
5. Two-story family room
6. Media room
7. Two-story foyer
8. Walking/jogging trails
9. Whirlpool tub in master bath
10. Carpeting on main level










Features most likely to be found in new homes

1. Walk-in closet
2. Laundry room
3. Low-emission windows
4. Great room
5. Energy Star appliances
6. Energy Star windows
7. Ceiling 1st floor 9’
8. 2-car garage
9. Programmable thermostat
10. Granite countertop


Features most likely to last

  • Solar panels: “With their increasing availability and affordability, solar panels are going to be the next big thing,” Melman says.
  • Garages: “People love their garages for storage space even if they don’t put cars in them,” he says. “I think at least the two-bay garage is here to stay.”
  • Additional bedrooms: “We have boomerang children, we have aging parents, we have caregivers who live with us, so we need the extra space.”
  • Decorative aging-in-place features: They include decorative handrails in bathrooms, higher toilets, and step-free showers, Melman says.
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Old 05-10-2015, 10:01 AM   #2
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This is about houses , but it captures the shift in thinking since the recession .

What changes will this mind shift bring to boats?
Personally, if I can get rid of my 34' I'll be looking for something smaller and less maintenance intensive.
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Old 05-11-2015, 08:16 PM   #3
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Personally, if I can get rid of my 34' I'll be looking for something smaller and less maintenance intensive.
Not sure you can get much smaller and still travel on.
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Old 05-12-2015, 07:31 AM   #4
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Not sure you can get much smaller and still travel on.

As it turns out, there's not going to be much traveling. Between my job, issues with the extended family and the unsuitability of my SO for co-piloting on extended trips, the boat gets used only for day trips around the Bay. And there aren't enough of them to justify the expense of keeping the old girl - the boat, not the SO.

It's been a blast, but I can scoot around the area in a smaller, faster and less expensive to maintain boat. I've been toying with the idea of selling for a while, but now I'm all in - time for the big boat to go, new hobbies & interests are on the horizon.

I'll keep the Flying Scott!
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:21 AM   #5
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Greetings,
Unlike a dirt dwelling one is limited to the physical confines of a boat. Solariums, outdoor kitchens, two, three or four car garages are as simple as more $$ and a greater footprint on a building lot. Impossible to incorporate extra living of a 50' boat into a 35' vessel unless one builds upward and THAT has it's stability limitations.
I expect marine designers NOT naval architects (for the most part) are obliged to fit the latest trends into new designs BUT at what cost (NOT $$ cost. Amenity and SPACE cost). Incorporation of a trash compactor, for example, means 1 less "space" for something else. Storage perhaps. A full stove/oven instead of a stove top again means less "space" for something else. As a result, one may have a boat with a lot of bells and whistles and no space for storage or the opposite situation-loads of storage with few or no "extras.
Witness the surge in popularity, in the smaller sized boats, of I/O units. Mashing the drive train into a smaller space allows more "stuff" to be crammed into a particular sized boat. Yes, lots of "goodies" but a service/maintenance nightmare. Even here on TF, members with somewhat larger boats are compromised by having to service/repair/replace items that have been shoehorned into a "How the hell did they get THAT in THERE" space.
One other issue that comes to mind with modern marketing is the "stretching" situation. A boat may be marketed as a 30' but is in essence a 24' with a 3' swim platform and a 3' bow pulpit. Saves money for the builder and grants the new owner bragging rights.
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:56 AM   #6
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I think the article is hinting that the new generation of buyers see quality in function instead if luxury. Notice that smaller and simpler cars are being sold, but with very integrated electronics. Perhaps it is an indication that living within ones means is becoming the norm again.
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Old 05-12-2015, 09:02 AM   #7
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"Personally, if I can get rid of my 34' I'll be looking for something smaller and less maintenance intensive."



Usually the size of the boat (with in reason) is not the cost driver.

Complexity and gadgets is expensive.

Perhaps justfy tossing stuff that dies , or selecting a less complex system might lower maint costs.

A new mini split air cond would provide both heat and cold air with out the variety of macheniry and hoses / piping required for the older marine systems?

a 2KW or 3KW Honda could replace a diesel noisemaker at 1/3 the cost?

KISS squared!
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Old 05-12-2015, 10:04 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
"Personally, if I can get rid of my 34' I'll be looking for something smaller and less maintenance intensive."



Usually the size of the boat (with in reason) is not the cost driver.

Complexity and gadgets is expensive.

Perhaps justfy tossing stuff that dies , or selecting a less complex system might lower maint costs.

A new mini split air cond would provide both heat and cold air with out the variety of macheniry and hoses / piping required for the older marine systems?

a 2KW or 3KW Honda could replace a diesel noisemaker at 1/3 the cost?

KISS squared!

I don't disagree. However, my boat can't get much less extravagant. No A/C, no generator, ancient, but functional electronics, etc. Marina fees, insurance and just the standard winterizing and spring preparations are eating up $4k - $5k each year. Now, if I was able to get more use out of the boat that money would be totally insignificant. But since I can find so little time to actually enjoy using the boat the cost/benefit ratio goes all to hell for me.

And, I have too many other interests on which to squander money!
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Old 05-13-2015, 06:22 AM   #9
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Sounds like its time to rent a boat when you get the urge.
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Old 05-13-2015, 07:31 AM   #10
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Sounds like its time to rent a boat when you get the urge.

Great minds think alike!
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