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Old 12-07-2012, 04:10 PM   #1
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Energy Cost, Etc... Split from Annual Numbers

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i know i am late to the party but thats how it is..
slip: $6K
Insurance: $1200
Diver/zincs: $1000
Maintenance and upkeep - improvements: average $4000/year

hours and fuel is all depending how much time you use.
i dont think we run the boat more than apprx 100 hrs/year but we spend much more time aboard.

as a side note, if you have to turn over each dime then you probably cannot afford a boat.
best advise i ever got was somone here who said dont spend your money on additional gadgets and stuff you dont really need, spend it on fuel and go enjoy boating.
I just got through taking all the boats i have been looking at and figureing out the amount of hours used per year and it comes out to 77. I sold a boat to a guy once with less than 100 hours on it and we became friends. After that he would kid me about the fact of 100 hours and i was on the water at least three days a week. Well the fact is i would go out, anchor and fish for a few minutes or maybe a whole day so the engine time was in fact low. I have been looking at 30 plus year old trawlers and they all seem to have 2500 average hours which seems ridiculous for a vessel that old. But in reality that is just normal hours. So, 100 hours times $5 per gallon 2 gallon per hour $500 per year for fuel??? Thats gotta be one of any boat owners smallest expenses
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:53 PM   #2
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I just got through taking all the boats i have been looking at and figureing out the amount of hours used per year and it comes out to 77. I sold a boat to a guy once with less than 100 hours on it and we became friends. After that he would kid me about the fact of 100 hours and i was on the water at least three days a week. Well the fact is i would go out, anchor and fish for a few minutes or maybe a whole day so the engine time was in fact low. I have been looking at 30 plus year old trawlers and they all seem to have 2500 average hours which seems ridiculous for a vessel that old. But in reality that is just normal hours. So, 100 hours times $5 per gallon 2 gallon per hour $500 per year for fuel??? Thats gotta be one of any boat owners smallest expenses


First of all 100 hours at 2 gallons per hour is 200 gallons...times $5 would be $1000.

Some of us use our boats closer to 400 hours so times 2 gallons per hour is 800 gallons times $5 per gallon is $4000. That would be my biggest single expense for the year except transient docking which I can adjust from near nothing to $12000 if I stay every night for my 4 month winter cruise.
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Old 12-07-2012, 07:13 PM   #3
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First of all 100 hours at 2 gallons per hour is 200 gallons...times $5 would be $1000.

Some of us use our boats closer to 400 hours so times 2 gallons per hour is 800 gallons times $5 per gallon is $4000. That would be my biggest single expense for the year except transient docking which I can adjust from near nothing to $12000 if I stay every night for my 4 month winter cruise.
opps, sorry for the miscalculation there. Its obvious you really use your boat much more than most. I don't think i have ever hit 400 hours in a year but have come close. Then there are other years when i am buried in work and i use them not at all so it averages out.
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Old 12-07-2012, 09:34 PM   #4
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opps, sorry for the miscalculation there. Its obvious you really use your boat much more than most. I don't think i have ever hit 400 hours in a year but have come close. Then there are other years when i am buried in work and i use them not at all so it averages out.
The point is, was and always will be that as fuel prices rise....the cruisers fuel budget is an important number...especially for those that are doing it on a low, fixed or nearly so budget.
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Old 12-07-2012, 11:41 PM   #5
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The point is, was and always will be that as fuel prices rise....the cruisers fuel budget is an important number...especially for those that are doing it on a low, fixed or nearly so budget.
yeah i be one of those fixed or nearly so at the moment.
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:32 AM   #6
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Fuel for your car will rise if you stay home. Food and clothing will rise. Taxes will rise. Last evening I had the pleasure of donating $2.17 to the state of South Carolina for the privilege of spending $25.00 on a computer part.

Point being that with the current state of affairs in the USA, if you are on a fixed income, you can expect your standard of living to go down whether you are cruising or staying home.

If you want to cruise, you better do it soon while diesel fuel is still "only" $5.00 per gallon.
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Old 12-08-2012, 11:25 AM   #7
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Fuel for your car will rise if you stay home. Food and clothing will rise. Taxes will rise. Last evening I had the pleasure of donating $2.17 to the state of South Carolina for the privilege of spending $25.00 on a computer part.

Point being that with the current state of affairs in the USA, if you are on a fixed income, you can expect your standard of living to go down whether you are cruising or staying home.

If you want to cruise, you better do it soon while diesel fuel is still "only" $5.00 per gallon.
Ron, you didn't directly mention the most insidious tax of all----inflation. With the government holding down interest rates to finance the horrendous national debt, and and increasing prices with slow growth of investments the fixed income people are really caught in a squeeze.
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Old 12-08-2012, 05:52 PM   #8
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Ron, you didn't directly mention the most insidious tax of all----inflation. With the government holding down interest rates to finance the horrendous national debt, and and increasing prices with slow growth of investments the fixed income people are really caught in a squeeze.
I didn't call it out by name, but that's what it is when the prices of everything rise.
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Old 12-08-2012, 07:34 PM   #9
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If you want to cruise, you better do it soon while diesel fuel is still "only" $5.00 per gallon.
Fuel prices tend to inflate, boat prices tend to deflate.
I`m seeing news items suggesting USA will return to oil self sufficiency as shale oil extraction improves and expands now the price of oil is high enough to justify producing oil that way. Alternative energy forms, like natural gas (LPG), wind power,solar, should help too.
Is that right, about shale oil,and would that contain pricing?
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:32 PM   #10
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Well, right now the Dakotas, particularly North (I think) Dakota is having a gold rush of oil exploration and production. The sons of two of my co- workers have moved there and are apparently making more money than they know what to do with. Whether all this ends up having an effect on fuel prices at the pump remains to be seen.

Personally I don't think it will because the prices are set by the market. The demand for oil is skyrocketing all over the world. I don't believe there is any law that says American oil can't be sold to China or India or Viet Nam. I see tankers leaving the refineries here in Puget Sound full as well as tankers arriving full. And some of these outbound full tankers are flying the red field/gold stars flag of the PRC.

So not only is Shell competing with Chevron and BP, but America is competing with China and Japan and Vietnam for the fuel and crude produced here. So the oil companies can sell their product here, of if they get a better price from Beijing, they can sell it there. Which means our pump prices won't change much.

They will go down if the demand for the product in the US goes down but I don't think this has as much influence as it used to because if we reduce our demand for fuel the Chinese will be increasing theirs. So the overall demand for the product won't fluctuate much.

Now if the US puts protectionist policies in place governing the sale of American oil as they did way back when they required Alaska crude to be shipped in American ships, then that could have a more dramatic impact on pump prices.

But I would be surprised to see this happen because the world is so interconnected now that a protectionist policy with regards to oil exports could have a very nasty repercussion that could hurt us just as much as our refusal to export oil could hurt other countries.
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:51 PM   #11
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Oil seems to be one of the few commodities we export. Still not enough to offset our trade imbalance. A while back I had a friend wringing his hands about all the lumber we export from the PNW. He was complaining that we should keep our natural resources in our own country. I couldn't convince him that that lumber is a renewable resource and we're making money and creating private sector jobs at the same time.

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Old 12-08-2012, 10:56 PM   #12
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Fuel prices tend to inflate, boat prices tend to deflate.
I`m seeing news items suggesting USA will return to oil self sufficiency as shale oil extraction improves and expands now the price of oil is high enough to justify producing oil that way. Alternative energy forms, like natural gas (LPG), wind power,solar, should help too.
Is that right, about shale oil,and would that contain pricing?
chuckle...we use 7,000,000 barrels aday in the USA. current oil shale is less than 100,000 per day so we have a long way to go. The total amount used is about 22% of the world total we use 2.555e9 barrels per year. That aint pocket change and the USA is only one country
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:07 PM   #13
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Oil seems to be one of the few commodities we export. Still not enough to offset our trade imbalance. A while back I had a friend wringing his hands about all the lumber we export from the PNW. He was complaining that we should keep our natural resources in our own country. I couldn't convince him that that lumber is a renewable resource and we're making money and creating private sector jobs at the same time.

Ray Muldrew
he was right. instead of exporting the wood you shouild only export the finished product. Instead of selling logs sell them plywood, osb, and other finished wood products. I thought Canada did that?
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Old 12-09-2012, 08:46 PM   #14
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You obviously don't have a realistic handle on business or the world economy and trade for us to have a meaningful discussion. Have a good one!

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Old 12-09-2012, 09:29 PM   #15
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You obviously don't have a realistic handle on business or the world economy and trade for us to have a meaningful discussion. Have a good one!

Ray Muldrew
So you think its better to export raw timber than to export finished wood products? You obviously have never looked at the economics of Canada or the USA. Where do you live, in China?
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Old 12-09-2012, 10:37 PM   #16
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I'll just share one thought in the form of a question...and let's use China as an example. Why would China buy a finished product from us and pay all of our built-in cost we have added through the last few decades; union wages, insurance, government regulation, etc., when they can manufacture the product themselves at a fraction of the cost?

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Old 12-10-2012, 01:00 AM   #17
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I'll just share one thought in the form of a question...and let's use China as an example. Why would China buy a finished product from us and pay all of our built-in cost we have added through the last few decades; union wages, insurance, government regulation, etc., when they can manufacture the product themselves at a fraction of the cost?
Followed by a further question...how long will the Chinese people be willing to work for slave labour wages for a "government" who deems them expendable? There's gonna be a day they rise up...
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Old 12-10-2012, 01:53 AM   #18
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Australia used to have a big steel industry, now it`s a small one.
Iron ore and coal are plentiful. But our labor costs make value adding uneconomic. We export the iron ore and coal to China, they turn it into steel, we buy it back cheaper than we can make it. It would make economic sense if we could value add by making steel here but no one would buy it,here or overseas, because it would cost too much.Same for timber out of Canada.
Oh,and we get to blame China for polluting the world by burning the coal we sell them. ("Really? I`d no idea they would burn that coal we sell them. How amazing!")
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:08 AM   #19
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Oil seems to be one of the few commodities we export. ....................
So why all this talk about reducing our dependency on impoted oil? I think your statement needs some backup.

Regardless of who, what, why, and where, the price of diesel fuel and what used to be called "gasoline" is rising and in the long run it's rising faster than the rate of inflation. The current administration in the USA is fine with that, they want us all taking public transportation or driving electric vehicles (where that electricity comes from is an entirely new thread).

My point being, if you have tha "lifetime cruise" in mind, the one that covers a few thousand miles, you better not put it off, you may not be able to afford it in a few years.
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Old 12-10-2012, 09:11 AM   #20
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Fuel prices tend to inflate, boat prices tend to deflate.
Prices for new boats are not deflating, they are inflating because of the increased cost of labor and materials and government regulation.

The price of used boats may be deflating because of the general economy and increased fuel prices. People can't afford to keep and use their boats.
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