Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-15-2011, 08:00 PM   #1
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Cars we should have kept

For a film project I'm currently directing we worked yesterday with a wonderful prop.* It is a 1966 Pontiac GTO that has won virtually every car show competition it has been entered in.* For example, the frame is powder coated gloss black.* The engine is the optional*TriPower V-8, it has a manual transmission with a Hurst shifter, the whole bit.

According to the owner--- who's in the car restoration business--- this car would fetch upwards of $50,000 today.* Working with it reminded me of some of the stuff we all have as kids or in college that we sell because we want something newer or we need the money, and then decades later come to regret.

Two of the biggies for me are from my freshman year in college.* I had an Austin Healey 3000 MKII for part of the year.* At the time, it was just an used*British sports car that wasn't worth all that much.* It was in great shape and ran wonderfully.* I sold it when I decided to leave Colorado State University and go back to Hawaii.* Big mistake.

The other thing was an M1 Garand National Match rifle.* I bought it in mint condition*for $65 in a gun store in Ft. Collins.* For anyone who doesn't know, the National Match version of the M1 Garand was identical to the WWII infantry rifle only it had much tighter tolerances in many of the the machined parts and much better sights.* It was made specifically for accuracy and was created for, among other things, 1000 yard open sight competitions in the military.* They are relatively rare and while I have not looked up prices today, they are worth a hell of a lot more than what I paid for mine.* This, too, I sold when I left Colorado to go back to Hawaii.* I sold it back to the same store I bought it from for...... $65.

Dumb, dumb, dumb.

The photo is a frame lifted from one of the film scenes.


-- Edited by Marin on Wednesday 16th of November 2011 02:11:24 AM
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	gto scenes.17.jpg
Views:	88
Size:	205.3 KB
ID:	8525  
__________________
Advertisement

Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 05:57 AM   #2
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
Cars we should have kept

Wow, yes, that's a nice car...I keep hoping my old trusty 21 yr old Celica GT4 Turbo 4WD will one day become a classic, to justify all I've spent on it, but I like things that are oldies but goodies....
Hey Marin, that gun...or I should say, rifle, sorry, was it anything like the good old 303 the Brits and their allies used in WW2...?
We were still using those in the 60s when I was in our high-school shooting team. Back then there was no concern over little things like hearing loss. I remember coming home from the range after a practice session and everyone sounded like they were talking to me through a blanket. Even as a 14 yr old I thought "this can't be good", and started taking cotton wool to plug up a bit with. I'm sure some of my high frequency hearing loss was caused back then, but boy, it was fun.


-- Edited by Peter B on Wednesday 16th of November 2011 06:59:45 AM
__________________

Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 06:11 AM   #3
Guru
 
Tidahapah's Avatar
 
City: Mooloolaba
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Tidahapah
Vessel Model: Bert Ellis Timber motor cruiser
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 1,779
RE: Cars we should have kept

Marin,
Know what you mean.
Sold my MG Tf when I first went to sea. I fully rebuilt it whilst I was doing my apprenticeship as a fitter and turner.
Use to hill climb it and use it as a daily drive. Engine change on a Friday night to go racing , home on Sunday arvo
to put my street engine back in for going to work.

My other was a wooden presentation box 9 mm German navy Luger with detachable butt and 3 barrels. Hand guns were illigal in Aus with out a Lic (still are) and I had to move it on at a silly price.
"Such is life"
Tidahapah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 08:32 AM   #4
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,733
RE: Cars we should have kept

My First car/love at 16 in 1961 was an Arnolt MG convertible (MG TD chassis and engine with custom Bertone coachwork) bought for $250. Only about 35 ever made. Eventually it got a cracked head and my father would not pay the $150 +/- to get it fixed so it got sold. Reasonably valuable today and I could replace the head myself now very easily and inexpensively.

Then in law school I bought a mid 60's Jaguar 3.8S sedan (manual with overdrive). Moved to Maine and the Jag was terrible in the snow so sold it and bought a Toyota FJ Landcruiser. I still lust after a mid 60's 3.8S but its constant upkeep needs drained my resources then and it's even more expensive to maintain these beasts now. They say one should have two jags of the same model: One to drive and one to be at the mechanic's. Too true.

When I was young I could only afford one car at a time and it had to serve as* primary transportation. Now I have the space and time to have a couple of car toys but can't afford to buy now the ones that I liked then (including, Marin, a Healey 3000). Nice cars are wasted on the young.

Attached pictures are of similar cars to the ones that I had that I found online for sale/sold.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	mgarnolt.jpg
Views:	81
Size:	71.0 KB
ID:	8529   Click image for larger version

Name:	mgarnolt2.jpg
Views:	83
Size:	85.7 KB
ID:	8530   Click image for larger version

Name:	mgarnolt3.jpg
Views:	84
Size:	78.7 KB
ID:	8531   Click image for larger version

Name:	jag3.8s.jpg
Views:	93
Size:	152.2 KB
ID:	8532   Click image for larger version

Name:	jag3.8s2.jpg
Views:	87
Size:	169.9 KB
ID:	8533  

Click image for larger version

Name:	jag3.8s3.jpg
Views:	86
Size:	174.4 KB
ID:	8534  
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 09:17 AM   #5
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,849
Cars we should have kept

1950 Jaguar Mark V Drop Head with 3 position top.

1953 Jaguar XK 120 MC

Also not pictured a 1972 Mercedes-Benz 450 SEL that was a great,beautiful, fast car.

Both cars too expensive to maintain for a young family's everyday transportation.* I drove the M-B on the road in my business.* In restored condition*both Jags*could both easily bring around 100 grand today.* Oh well, they were fun while I had them.

*


-- Edited by Moonstruck on Wednesday 16th of November 2011 10:21:20 AM
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	don's mkv jag 2.jpg
Views:	89
Size:	146.6 KB
ID:	8536  
Attached Images
 
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 10:04 AM   #6
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,733
RE: Cars we should have kept

Quote:
Moonstruck wrote:*Oh well, they were fun while I had them.
*A good epitaph! Could apply to boats, youthful years, and probably a few other things.
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 10:15 AM   #7
Guru
 
skipperdude's Avatar
 
City: Whittier AK
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Apache II
Vessel Model: 1974 Donald Jones
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,147
Cars we should have kept

This was mine. 67 Plymouth Baracuda.

Man the fun I had in that car.


-- Edited by skipperdude on Wednesday 16th of November 2011 11:15:53 AM
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1967-plymouth-001.jpg
Views:	98
Size:	132.7 KB
ID:	8537  
skipperdude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 02:04 PM   #8
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Cars we should have kept

Quote:
Peter B wrote:
Hey Marin, that gun...or I should say, rifle, sorry, was it anything like the good old 303 the Brits and their allies used in WW2...?
*No, it was more advanced.* The US forces did not start the war with this rifle but it came into use soon after and eventually*became the standard issue weapon.

Like the Springfield bolt action rifle that preceded it, the M1 is.30 caliber (civilian name for the caliber is.30-06, 1906 being the year the cartridge was introduced).* The M1 is a gas-operated, semi-automatic rifle with an 8-round clip magazine that inserts from the top when the bolt is open.* The clip proved a bit problematic at times, not because it didn't work--- it worked very well--- but because after the last round was fired the bolt locked open and the clip, which was just a U-shaped piece of stamped metal, was ejected out the top of the rifle by a powerful spring.* It was powerful enough to thow the empty clip clear of the rifle and the rifleman, but because it was a single piece of stamped steel it made a very distinctive 'ring" when it came out of the rifle and hit the ground, particularly if it was rock or concrete.* The Germans and Japanese soon learned to recognize this sound, so when they heard it they knew they had a few seconds while the American pulled a new, pre-loaded clip out of his pouch and shoved it down into the rifle, which would automatically close the bolt and feed the first round into the chamber.

The legal number of rounds that could be carried in a rifle for hunting puroses in Colorado was five, so I modified a standard clip with a block of wood in the bottom which limited the clip*capacity to four (you could also load a round into the chamber independently of the clip).* The block also prevented the clip from being ejected after the last round was fired.

The clip "ring" aside, the M1 is a near-indestructible rifle that is almost jam-proof.* I first became aware of them when I was in 10th grade in Hawaii and, like all boys in the public and private schools over there at that time, was in Army ROTC (it was required, no excuses).* An M1 with the firing pin removed was assigned to each boy during 10th and 11th grades and*he was responsible for keeping it clean and so on.* We had drill every Wednesday after school for an hour and used the rifle for marching, running through the manual of arms, etc.

I really like the M1 so when I had the opportunity to buy one when I went to college I did.* My major mistake was to sell it. My National Match M1 looked identical to the photo below except*the open sights were difrferent and*much more refined.

More than you wanted to know, but there you have it.


-- Edited by Marin on Wednesday 16th of November 2011 03:07:23 PM
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	m1rifle.jpg
Views:	78
Size:	23.5 KB
ID:	8538  
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 04:41 PM   #9
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,849
RE: Cars we should have kept

Quote:
Marin wrote:it worked very well--- but because after the last round was fired the bolt locked open and the clip, which was just a U-shaped piece of stamped metal, was ejected out the top of the rifle by a powerful spring.* It was powerful enough to thow the empty clip clear of the rifle and the rifleman, but because it was a single piece of stamped steel it made a very distinctive 'ring" when it came out of the rifle and hit the ground, particularly if it was rock or concrete.* The Germans and Japanese soon learned to recognize this sound, so when they heard it they knew they had a few seconds while the American pulled a new, pre-loaded clip out of his pouch and shoved it down into the rifle, which would automatically close the bolt and feed the first round into the chamber.
*The M-1 Garand was my rifle when in the army.* Because I had one in ROTC and on active duty, I could field strip and clean it blindfolded.* Reloading was very quick because, as you said, upon firing the last round the clip was expelled and the bolt stayed open.* Loading with a fully loaded clip from the top was fast.* Just be sure*to get the thumb out of the way before the bolt slammed shut.* I saw many a blood blister on a thumb.

It was a great reliable weapon.* It was heavy to carry all day, and*it had no full automatic mode.* It did beat by a long shot carrying a BAR.*
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 05:18 PM   #10
TF Site Team
 
dwhatty's Avatar
 
City: Home Port: Buck's Harbor, Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: "Emily Anne"
Vessel Model: 2001 Island Gypsy 32 Europa (Hull #146)
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 2,733
RE: Cars we should have kept

Quote:
Moonstruck wrote:
Quote:
Just be sure*to get the thumb out of the way before the bolt slammed shut
Quote:
__________________________________________________ _____
Quote:
Been there, done that. Navy boot camp. 1965. First and last time they let us handle one of those. Lost a little bit of skin.
dwhatty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 07:26 PM   #11
Guru
 
ancora's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,490
RE: Cars we should have kept

As a crewmember of a VTR, I was issued a .45 cal. "grease gun." Turned out to be a good deal; never had to go to the range, easy to clean, no-manual-of-arms, and if I dropped it in the Rhine, it would cost nine bucks to replace it. The ideal weapon for an unmotivated draftee.
ancora is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2011, 07:34 PM   #12
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
Cars we should have kept

When I was in high school in ROTC Viet Nam was going full bore. In addtion to our assigned M1s, which along with the Colt 1911 pistol*we had to learn to take apart and put back together blindfolded (we were tested on this and had a time limit to beat), we also were introduced to the M14 which was then the standard rifle in the Army. Very similar in operation to the M1 but it used a detachable, bottom load magazine and the upper hand guard was made of plastic in an attempt to reduce weight. The Army master sergeants who taught our ROTC classes didn't like it.

The M16 was just starting to make an appearance--- they weren't even called M16s then but were called AR15s. Our instructor brought one to class once so we could see it and get an introductory course on it. I remember that compared to the M1 and M14 it looked like a space ray gun. We also learned how to operate, dissassemble, and reassemble the M60 machine gun, something all high school students should know how to do.

It was a very different era plus Hawaii was a very military state being as how the military at that time was the number one source of income for the state. Tourism was a distant number three, behind the military and agriculture (sugar and pineapple).


-- Edited by Marin on Wednesday 16th of November 2011 08:35:44 PM
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 05:35 AM   #13
TF Site Team
 
Peter B's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Country: Australia
Vessel Name: Lotus
Vessel Model: Clipper (CHB) 34 Sedan/Europa style
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 6,669
Send a message via Skype™ to Peter B
RE: Cars we should have kept

Yes, I see it is a much more sophisticated rifle than the old 303, which was simple bolt action, 10 round mag, and really simple. They served the boys well in the conflict however, being very accurate and reliable. The 303 refers to the bore dimension, being virtually the same as the M1 30 it appears.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee-Enfield
Peter B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 07:01 AM   #14
Guru
 
Moonstruck's Avatar
 
City: Hailing Port: Charleston, SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moonstruck
Vessel Model: Sabre 42 Hardtop Express
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 7,849
RE: Cars we should have kept

A good rifle squad with M-1s*covering a field of fire could do the work of one 30 cal. machine gun in a small area.* I never qualified with a machine gun.* With the average front line life of a machine gunner, I didn't want to get close to one.* We had a couple mounted on Jeeps and 3/4 ton trucks, but that was a suicide seat.* I think they were mostly noise makers for maneuvers.

We were later issued M-14s, and no one liked them.* We could never achieve the accuracy of the M-1.* They also were more sensitive to dirt in the field.* A jammed weapon can be a death sentence.
Moonstruck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 07:27 AM   #15
Guru
 
Gulf Comanche's Avatar
 
City: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Country: U.S.A.
Vessel Name: Old School
Vessel Model: 38' Trawler custom built by Hike Metal Products
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 799
RE: Cars we should have kept

I wish I had my M1 Carbine, bought from the NRA in 1963 for $15. It was still in Cosmoline when I got it and was made by Underwood if I remember correctly. They were also selling Garands for maybe $25.
Gulf Comanche is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2011, 12:22 PM   #16
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
RE: Cars we should have kept

Quote:
Peter B wrote:
The 303 refers to the bore dimension, being virtually the same as the M1 30 it appears.
*Almost but not exact.* The .303 has a bullet diameter of 0.311 or 7.9 mm.* The .30-06 has a bullet diameter of 0.308 or 7.62 mm.* The casings of both rounds are very different.* The .303 is a rimmed case where the .30-06 has an rimmless case with an extractor groove.
Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 07:47 AM   #17
Guru
 
ARoss's Avatar
 
City: Chocowinity NC
Vessel Name: My Yuki
Vessel Model: 1973 Marine Trader 34
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 625
RE: Cars we should have kept

Looks like this thread got hi-jacked. I was gonna comment on my 1967 Camaro SS convertible, bought new 2 days after discharge from the Navy.

350, Hurst 4 speed.* A real hog to drive -- no power steering, brakes -- also a manual top.* Parking, with those fat red-stripe wide oval Firestones, manual steering.. definitely not a chick car.*

Had to sell the car in '69 when I got married -- wife claimed she'd never learn to drive a stick.* Plus I don't think the SWMBO wanted me riding around in it any more.*

Wish I still had even a photo of the car, but this one's an almost exact match, tho mine was blue.** Oh well, I don't have the car any more, but still have the wife.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	67camaroconvertible.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	66.6 KB
ID:	8598  
ARoss is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 08:45 AM   #18
Newbie
 
City: Maryland
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1988 Mainship Sedan 36
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 4
RE: Cars we should have kept

well...my Tyrol Blue/Parchment 1967 GTO, 4 spd, tri-power, front disc brakes, ported heads, cam,..comes to mind. Now its on the New England show circuit.

For DD duty, I had an AUdi A6 4.2L (V8)...I was annoyed at having a sedan when I sold it...in retrospect it was a great balance of power and excellent fit/finish.* I had an '04 GTO as well, some of the suspension parts were under-spec'd and the styling wasn't too compelling, but it was also fun to drive and easy to tinker with.

My Porsche 928s, so far I've kept two and sold one...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	frontlightsup.jpg
Views:	75
Size:	291.6 KB
ID:	8600   Click image for larger version

Name:	silver_gto_falken_koblenz_wheels.jpg
Views:	79
Size:	79.1 KB
ID:	8601  
Attached Images
 
SMTCapeCod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2011, 09:22 AM   #19
Guru
 
Steve's Avatar
 
City: Thibodaux, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gumbo
Vessel Model: 2003 Monk 36
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,607
RE: Cars we should have kept

Mine was a 1968 Dodge Charger with black vinyl top and red body, no pictures but a real beauty.
I've still got my first gun, an H&R .22 revolver, plus others, never got rid of one.
Steve W
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-21-2011, 02:15 AM   #20
Scraping Paint
 
City: -
Country: -
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13,748
RE: Cars we should have kept

Don't have a photo but it was neat experience today..... On the way up to the boat in Bellingham on I-5 we came up on an absolutely immaculate Rolls Royce. Similar in style to the web photo below (1959 RR Silver Cloud) it was two-tone like this but tan and burgandy. Right hand drive. What was cool was the couple driving it appeared to be in their eighties. Nice to see these machines still being cared for and used, and particularly nice to see older folks enjoying them.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	rolls-royce_silver_cloud_1959.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	72.6 KB
ID:	8610  
__________________

Marin is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cars and Computers ARoss Harbor Chat 2 10-18-2011 07:41 PM




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012