Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-22-2013, 03:28 PM   #1
Guru
 
City: somewhere
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,356
Canola Oil

I just learned that canola oil is toxic to humans and is a GMO. It was originally called rapeseed oil that was used to lubricate steam engines.

It was developed in Canada, which canola is an abbreviation. They spent 50 mill to get it approved in the US.

Do some research and form your own opinion.
__________________
Advertisement

__________________
Life is a Beach
beachbum29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 05:12 PM   #2
Veteran Member
 
weebobby's Avatar
 
City: Cochrane, Alberta
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Painters Cove
Vessel Model: 1997 Bayliner 5788
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by beachbum29 View Post
I just learned that canola oil is toxic to humans and is a GMO. It was originally called rapeseed oil that was used to lubricate steam engines.

It was developed in Canada, which canola is an abbreviation. They spent 50 mill to get it approved in the US.

Do some research and form your own opinion.
And you will quickly and easily find out that this is all bulls-----t !!
__________________

weebobby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 05:12 PM   #3
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,447
Canola oil is good in salads. In fact, probably just about every deep fryer uses Canola oil so you are right, it is toxic to humans.
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 05:42 PM   #4
Guru
 
City: somewhere
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,356
Quote:
Originally Posted by weebobby View Post

And you will quickly and easily find out that this is all bulls-----t !!
Please provide your proof.
__________________
Life is a Beach
beachbum29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 05:48 PM   #5
Guru
 
Xsbank's Avatar
 
City: Pender Harbour, BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Gwaii Haanas
Vessel Model: Vancouver Shipyards Custom Aluminum 52
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 2,447
Will this do? If this is too annoying I can delete it.

For the inventor of the harp in Celtic mythology, see Canola (mythology).

The examples and perspective in this article deal primarily with North America and do not represent a worldwide view of the subject. Please improve this article and discuss the issue on the talk page. (May 2012)
Canola refers to both an edible oil (also known as Canola oil) produced from the seed of any of several varieties of the rape plant, and to those plants, namely a cultivar of either rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) or field mustard/turnip rape (Brassica rapa subsp. oleifera, syn. Brassica campestris L.). The oil is suitable for consumption by humans[1][2] and livestock,[3] and for use as biodiesel.
Canola was bred naturally from rapeseed at the University of Manitoba, Canada by Keith Downey and Baldur R. Stefansson in the early 1970s, and had a different nutritional profile in addition to much less erucic acid. In the international community Canola is generally referred to as Rapeseed 00 or Double Zero Rapeseed to denote both low glucosinolates and low erucic acid. In addition to varieties from the traditional Rapa dn Napus species, recent cross-breeding of multiples lines of Brassica juncea have enable this mustard variety to be classified as a canola variety by lowering both erucic acid and glucosinolates to the market standards, achieving LEAR status (for low erucic acid rapeseed). It may also be referred to as canola oil and is considered safe for human consumption.[4]
Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Production and trade
3 Canola oil
3.1 Health information
3.2 Erucic acid issues
3.3 Biodiesel
3.4 Comparison to other vegetable oils
4 Genetic modification issues
4.1 Legal issues
5 See also
6 References
7 External links
History[edit source | editbeta]



Close up of rapeseed blooms


Canola flower


Canola field in Temora, New South Wales
Canola was developed through conventional plant breeding from rapeseed, an oilseed plant already used in ancient civilization as a fuel. The word "rape" in rapeseed comes from the Latin word rapum meaning turnip. Turnip, rutabaga, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, mustard, and many other vegetables are related to the two natural canola varieties commonly grown, which are cultivars of Brassica napus and Brassica rapa. The change in name serves to distinguish it from natural rapeseed oil, which has much higher erucic acid content.
Brassica oilseed varieties are some of the oldest plants cultivated by humanity, with documentation of its use in India 4,000 years ago, and use in China and Japan 2,000 years ago.[5]:55 Its use in Northern Europe for oil lamps is documented to the 13th century.[5] Its use was limited until the development of steam power, when machinists found rapeseed oil clung to water- or steam-washed metal surfaces better than other lubricants. World War II saw high demand for the oil as a lubricant for the rapidly increasing number of steam engines in naval and merchant ships. When the war blocked European and Asian sources of rapeseed oil, a critical shortage developed and Canada began to expand its limited rapeseed production.
After the war, demand declined sharply and farmers began to look for other uses for the plant and its products. Rapeseed oil extracts were first put on the market in 1956–1957 as food products, but these suffered from several unacceptable characteristics. Rapeseed oil had a distinctive taste and a disagreeable greenish colour due to the presence of chlorophyll. It also contained a high concentration of erucic acid. Experiments on animals have pointed to the possibility that erucic acid, consumed in large quantities, may cause heart damage, although Indian researchers have published findings that call into question these conclusions and the implication that the consumption of mustard or rapeseed oil is dangerous.[6][7][8][9][10] Feed meal from the rapeseed plant also was not particularly appealing to livestock, due to high levels of sharp-tasting compounds called glucosinolates, and they would not eat it.
Canola was bred naturally from rapeseed at the University of Manitoba, Canada by Keith Downey and Baldur R. Stefansson in the early 1970s,[11][12] and had a very different nutritional profile in addition to much less erucic acid.[13] The name "canola" was chosen by the board of the Rapeseed Association of Canada in 1978.[citation needed] The "Can" part refers to Canada but the "ola" part has no real meaning despite several attempts by others to read a meaning into it; there were several other products around at the time and decades earlier using the "ola" tag including Mazola™, Ricola™, Victrola, Grafonola, Amerola, Shinola, etc.
A variety developed in 1998 is considered to be the most disease- and drought-resistant Canola variety of rapeseed to date. This and other recent varieties have been produced by using genetic engineering. In 2011 26% of the acres sown were genetically modified (biotech) canola.[14]
Canola was originally a trademark, but is now a generic term for edible varieties of rapeseed oil in North America and Australia. In Canada, an official definition of canola is codified in Canadian law.[15]
Production and trade[edit source | editbeta]

Rapeseed was once considered a specialty crop in Canada, but canola now has become a major American cash crop. Canada and the United States produce between 7 and 10 million tonnes of canola seed per year. Annual Canadian exports total 3 to 4 million tonnes of the seed, 800,000 tonnes of canola oil and 1 million tonnes of canola meal. GM canola may not be grown in jurisdictions that have not approved GMOs. Within the United States, 90% of the canola crop is grown in North Dakota.[16]
Rapeseed is the highest-producing oil-seed crop in the USA. An Oregon State University researcher has determined that growing winter for hybrid canola seed appears possible in central Oregon, USA, but the state prohibits it from being grown in Deschutes, Jefferson, and Crook counties because it may attract bees away from specialty seed crops such as carrots, which require bees for pollination. The rapeseed blossom is a major source of nectar for honeybees.
The major customers of canola seed are Japan, Mexico, China, and Pakistan, while the bulk of canola oil and meal goes to the United States, with smaller amounts shipped to Mexico, China, and Europe. World production of rapeseed oil in the 2002–2003 season was about 14 million metric tons.[17] In the 2010–2011 season, world production is estimated to be at 58.4 million tonnes.[18] The United States is a net consumer of canola oil, having used 3 billion pounds in 2010, 2.5 billion of which was imported from Canada.[16]
The main price discovery mechanism for worldwide canola trade is the ICE Futures Canada (formerly Winnipeg Commodity Exchange) canola futures contract. Rapeseed is traded on the Euronext exchange.
Canola oil[edit source | editbeta]



Bottle of canola cooking oil
Canola oil is made at a processing facility by slightly heating and then crushing the seed. Almost all commercial grade canola oil is then refined using hexane. Finally, the crude oil is refined using water precipitation and organic acid, "bleaching" with clay, and deodorizing using steam distillation.[19] Approximately 43% of a seed is oil.[20] What remains is a rapeseed meal that is used as high quality animal feed. 22.68 kg (50 lb) of rapeseed makes approximately 10 L (2.64 US gal) of canola oil. Canola oil is a key ingredient in many foods. Its reputation as a healthy oil has created high demand in markets around the world, and overall it is the third most widely consumed vegetable oil in the world.[21]
The oil has many non-food uses, and often replaces non-renewable resources in products including industrial lubricants, biofuels, candles, lipsticks, and newspaper inks.
The average density of canola oil is 0.92 g/ml.[22]
Health information[edit source | editbeta]
Compound Family % of total
Oleic acid
ω-9
61%[23]
Linoleic acid
ω-6
21%[23]
Alpha-linolenic acid
ω-3
11%[23] 9%[24][25]
Saturated fatty acids
7%[23]
Palmitic acid
4%[24]
Stearic acid
2%[24]
Trans fat
0.4%[26]
Canola oil is low in saturated fat and contains both omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in a ratio of 2:1. If consumed, it also reduces low-density lipoprotein and overall cholesterol levels, and as a significant source of the essential omega-3 fatty acid is associated with reduced all-cause and cardiovascular mortality.[27] It is recognized by many health professional organizations including the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and American Heart Association.[28][29][30][31] Canola oil has been given a qualified health claim from the United States Food and Drug Administration due to its high levels of cholesterol-lowering fats.[32]
Erucic acid issues[edit source | editbeta]
Main article: Erucic acid
Although wild rapeseed oil contains significant amounts of erucic acid,[33] a known toxin,[34] the cultivar used to produce commercial, food-grade canola oil was bred to contain less than 2% erucic acid, levels that are not believed to cause harm in humans[35][36] and no health effects have been associated with consumption by humans of the genetically modified oil.[34] Although rumors that canola oil can cause dangerous health problems circulated,[37][38] there is no reason to believe canola oil poses unusual health risks and its consumption in food-grade forms is generally recognized as safe by the United States Food and Drug Administration.[2][35]
The Chinese and Indians have used rapeseed oils for thousands of years, but the form used was unrefined (natural) which may make a difference in effect on health.[39]
Biodiesel[edit source | editbeta]
Main article: Biodiesel
Because of the lower levels of the toxic and irritating properties of genetically modified rapeseed oil, Canola oil is a more promising source for manufacturing biodiesel than the natural oil as a renewable alternative to fossil fuels.[citation needed]
Comparison to other vegetable oils[edit source | editbeta]
Vegetable oils
Type Saturated
fatty acids[40] Mono-
unsaturated
fatty acids[40] Polyunsaturated fatty acids Oleic acid
(ω-9) Smoke point
Total poly[40] linolenic acid
(ω-3) Linoleic acid
(ω-6)
Not hydrogenated
Canola (rapeseed) 7.365 63.276 28.142 9-11 19-21 - 400 F (204 C)[41]
Coconut 91.00 6.000 3.000 - 2 6 350 F (177 C)[41]
Corn 12.948 27.576 54.677 1 58 28 450 F (232 C)[42]
Cottonseed 25.900 17.800 51.900 1 54 19 420 F (216 C)[42]
Flaxseed/Linseed (European)[43] 6 - 9 10 - 22 68 - 89 56 - 71 12 - 18 10 - 22 225 F (107 C)
Olive 14.00 72.00 14.00 <1.5 9–20 - 380 F (193 C)[41]
Palm 49.300 37.000 9.300 - 10 40 455 F (235 C)[44]
Peanut 16.900 46.200 32.000 - 32 48 437 F (225 C)[42]
Safflower
(>70% linoleic) 8.00 15.00 75.00 - - - 410 F (210 C)[41]
Safflower
(high oleic) 7.541 75.221 12.820 - - - 410 F (210 C)[41]
Soybean 15.650 22.783 57.740 7 54 24 460 F (238 C)[42]
Sunflower
(<60% linoleic) 10.100 45.400 40.100 0.200 39.800 45.300 440 F (227 C)[42]
Sunflower
(>70% oleic) 9.859 83.689 3.798 - - - 440 F (227 C)[42]
Fully hydrogenated
Cottonseed (hydrog.) 93.600 1.529 .587 .287[40]
Palm (hydrogenated) 47.500 40.600 7.500
Soybean (hydrogen.) 21.100 73.700 .400 .096[40]
Values as percent (%) by weight of total fat.
Genetic modification issues[edit source | editbeta]



Blooming Canola field in Saskatchewan
A genetically engineered rapeseed that is tolerant to herbicide was first introduced to Canada in 1995. In 2009, 90% of the Canadian crop was herbicide-tolerant.[45] As of 2005, 87% of the canola grown in the US was genetically modified.[46] A 2010 study conducted in North Dakota found glyphosate- or glufosinate-resistance transgenes in 80% of wild natural rapeseed plants, and a few plants that were resistant to both herbicides. The escape of the genetically modified plants has raised concerns that the build-up of herbicide resistance in feral canola could make it more difficult to manage these plants using herbicides. However one of the researchers agrees that ".. feral populations could have become established after trucks carrying cultivated GM seeds spilled some of their load during transportation." She also notes that the GM canola results they found may have been biased as they only sampled along roadsides.[47]
Legal issues[edit source | editbeta]
Genetically modified canola has become a point of controversy and contentious legal battles. In one high-profile case (Monsanto Canada Inc. v. Schmeiser) the Monsanto Company sued Percy Schmeiser for patent infringement after he replanted canola seed that he had harvested from his field, which he discovered was contaminated with Monsanto's patented glyphosate-tolerant canola by spraying it with glyphosate, leaving only the resistant plants. The Supreme Court ruled that Percy was in violation of Monsanto's patent because he knowingly replanted the resistant seed that he had harvested, but he was not required to pay Monsanto damages since he did not benefit financially from its presence.[48] On 19 March 2008, Schmeiser and Monsanto Canada Inc. came to an out-of-court settlement whereby Monsanto would pay for the clean-up costs of the contamination, which came to a total of C$660.[49]
In 2003, Australia's gene technology regulator approved the release of canola altered to make it resistant to Glufosinate ammonium, a herbicide.[50] The introduction of the genetically modified crop to Australia generated considerable controversy.[51] Canola is Australia's third biggest crop, and is used often by wheat farmers as a break crop to improve soil quality. As of 2008 the only genetically modified crops in Australia were canola, cotton, and carnations.[52][53]
See also[edit source | editbeta]

Food portal
List of canola diseases
Rapeseed
Triangle of U
References[edit source | editbeta]

Jump up ^ Dupont, J; White, PJ; Johnston, HA; McDonald, BE; Grundy, SM; Bonanome, A (October 1989). "Food safety and health effects of canola oil". Journal of the American College of Nutrition 8 (5): 360–375. PMID 2691543.
^ Jump up to: a b Zeratsky, Katherine (2009). "Canola Oil: Does it Contain Toxins?". Mayo Clinic. Retrieved 10 August 2011.
Jump up ^ "Canola". infoplease.com. Retrieved 2008-12-29.
Jump up ^ "Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed (Lear) Oil Derived From Canola-quality Brassica juncea (L.) CZERN. Lines PC 97-03, PC98-44 AND PC98-45". Health Canada. 2003-03-27. Retrieved 2008-12-29.
^ Jump up to: a b Snowdon R et al. "Oilseed Rape". Chapter 2 in Genome Mapping and Molecular Breeding in Plants: OIlseeds. Ed, Chittaranjan Kole. Springer, 2007
Jump up ^ Ghafoorunissa (1996). "Fats in Indian Diets and Their Nutritional and health Implications". Lipids 31: S287–S291. doi:10.1007/BF02637093. PMID 8729136.
Jump up ^ Shenolikar, I (1980). "Fatty Acid Profile of Myocardial Lipid in Populations Consuming Different Dietary Fats". Lipids 15 (11): 980–982. doi:10.1007/BF02534427.
Jump up ^ Bellenand, JF; Baloutch, G; Ong, N; Lecerf, J (1980). "Effects of Coconut Oil on Heart Lipids and on Fatty Acid Utilization in Rapeseed Oil". Lipids 15 (11): 938–943. doi:10.1007/BF02534418.
Jump up ^ Achaya, KT (1987). "Fat Status of Indians – A Review". Journal of Scientific & Industrial Research 46 (3): 112–126.
Jump up ^ Indu, M; Ghafoorunissa (1992). "n-3 Fatty Acids in Indian Diets – Comparison of the Effects of Precursor (Alpha-Linolenic Acid) vs Product (Long chain n-3 Poly Unsaturated Fatty Acids)". Nutrition Research 12 (4–5): 569–582. doi:10.1016/S0271-5317(05)80027-2.
Jump up ^ "Richard Keith Downey: Genetics". science.ca. 2007. Retrieved 2008-12-29.
Jump up ^ Storgaard, AK (2008). "Stefansson, Baldur Rosmund". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2008-12-29.
Jump up ^ Barthet, V. "Canola". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2008-12-29.
Jump up ^ "Biotech Canola – Annual Update 2011". International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech Applications. Retrieved 2013-05-26.
Jump up ^ "Canola Varieties". Canola Growers Manual. Canola Council of Canada. Retrieved 2008-04-12.
^ Jump up to: a b As canola demand rises, US works to grow more, Gannett, Associated Press, 19 August 2011, retrieved 20 August 2011
Jump up ^ USDA. "Agricultural Statistics 2005" (PDF).
Jump up ^ FAS.usda.gov
Jump up ^ CanolaInfo | What is Canola Oil?
Jump up ^ Soyatech.com
Jump up ^ CanolaInfo | What is Canola Oil?
Jump up ^ "Section 3.1: Leaking Tank Experiments with Orimulsion and Canola Oil". NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS OR&R 6. Ocean Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. December 2001.
^ Jump up to: a b c d "Comparison of Dietary Fats Chart". Canola Council of Canada. Retrieved 2008-09-03.
^ Jump up to: a b c USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21 (2008)
Jump up ^ DeFilippis, Andrew P.; Laurence S. Sperling. "Understanding omega-3's" (PDF). Archived from the original on 22 October 2007.
Jump up ^ USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 22 (2009)
Jump up ^ O'Brien, R (2008). Fats and Oils Formulating and Processing for Applications, Third Edition: Formulating and Processing for Applications. CRC Press. pp. 37–40. ISBN 1420061666.
Jump up ^ "Canola Oil: Good for Every Body" (PDF). American Dietetic Association. 2006. Archived from the original on 27 November 2008.
Jump up ^ "Knowing Your Fats". American Heart Association. 2008. Retrieved 2012-11-12.
Jump up ^ "Protect Your Heart: Choose Fats Wisely" (PDF). American Diabetes Association. 2004. Retrieved 2008-09-03.
Jump up ^ "AAFP 2006-Changing the Landscape of Chronic Disease Care". American Association of Family Physicians 2006 Scientific Assembly. 2006. Retrieved 2008-09-03.
Jump up ^ "Qualified Health Claims, Letter of Enforcement Discretion U.S. Food and Drug Administration". 2006. Retrieved 2008-09-03.
Jump up ^ doi:10.1007/BF02672436
^ Jump up to: a b Reddy, Chada S.; Hayes, A. Wallace (2007). "Foodborne Toxicants". In Hayes, A. Wallace. Principles and methods of toxicology (5th ed.). London, UK: Informa Healthcare. p. 640. ISBN 0-8493-3778-X.
^ Jump up to: a b U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21 1 April 2010.
Jump up ^ The Commission of the European Communities (1980). "Commission Directive 80/891/EEC of 25 July 1980 relating to the Community method of analysis for determining the erucic acid content in oils and fats intended to be used as such for human consumption and foodstuffs containing added oils or fats". EurLex Official Journal 254.
Jump up ^ Mikkelson, Barbara (30 December 2005). "Canola Oil and Rape Seed". Snopes.com. Retrieved 29 November 2012.
Jump up ^ Edell, Dean (1999). "Canola Oil: Latest Internet Hoax Victim". Healthcentral.com. Retrieved 2007-10-20.
Jump up ^ Erasmus, Udo (2007). Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill (Rev., updated and expanded ed.). Summertown, Tenn.: Alive Books. p. 117. ISBN 0920470386.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e "Nutrient database, Release 24". United States Department of Agriculture. All values in this column are from the USDA Nutrient database unless otherwise cited.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e Katragadda, H. R.; Fullana, A. S.; Sidhu, S.; Carbonell-Barrachina, . A. (2010). "Emissions of volatile aldehydes from heated cooking oils". Food Chemistry 120: 59. doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2009.09.070. edit
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Wolke, Robert L. (May 16, 2007). "Where There's Smoke, There's a Fryer". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 5, 2011.
Jump up ^ Fatty acid composition of important plant and animal fats and oils (German) 21 December 2011, Hans-Jochen Fiebig, Mnster
Jump up ^ (Italian) Scheda tecnica dell'olio di palma bifrazionato PO 64.
Jump up ^ Beckie, Hugh et al (Autumn 2011) GM Canola: The Canadian Experience Farm Policy Journal, Volume 8 Number 8, Autumn Quarter 2011. Retrieved 20 August 2012
Jump up ^ Johnson, Stanley R. et al Quantification of the Impacts on US Agriculture of Biotechnology-Derived Crops Planted in 2006 National Center for Food and Agricultural Policy, Washington DC, February 2008. Retrieved 12 August 2010.
Jump up ^ "GM crop escapes into the American wild". Retrieved 2011-08-24.
Jump up ^ Federal Court of Appeal of Canada. Monsanto Canada Inc. v. Schmeiser (C.A.) [2003] 2 F.C. 165. Retrieved 25 March 2006.
Jump up ^ "Monsanto vs Schmeiser: In the Spotlight". Retrieved 2009-03-05.
Jump up ^ "GM canola gets the green light". Sydney Morning Herald. 1 April 2003. Retrieved 2007-10-20.
Jump up ^ for example Price, Libby (6 September 2005). "Network of concerned farmers demands tests from Bayer". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2007-10-10. and "Greenpeace has the last laugh on genetic grains talks". Australian Broadcaasting Corporation. 13 March 2003. Retrieved 2007-10-20. also Cauchi, Stephen (25 October 2003). "GM: food for thought". The Age. Retrieved 2007-10-20.
Jump up ^ GM Crops and Stockfeed
Jump up ^ GM Carnations in Australia
External links[edit source | editbeta]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Canola
Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Brassica campestris
Review of University of Alberta Canola Breeding Program
Swathing and Harvesting Canola
Canola Production
North Dakota State University picture comparing canola oil fatty acid content with other oils.
USDA-ERS Briefing Room - Canola Summary of canola production, trade, and consumption as well as links to relevant USDA reports.
[show] v t e
Edible fats and oils
[show] v t e
Brassica
Xsbank is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2013, 07:06 PM   #6
Guru
 
Codger2's Avatar
 
City: San Diego
Country: US
Vessel Name: "Sandpiper"
Vessel Model: 2006 42' Ocean Alexander Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 5,420
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xsbank View Post
Will this do? If this is too annoying I can delete it.
WOW! Really interesting!
__________________
Codger2

My passion for improving my boat(s) exceeds my desire to constantly cruise them.
Codger2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 12:58 AM   #7
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,321
Try googling 'Monsanto GMO litigation' and be afraid...
__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 06:01 AM   #8
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
>Try googling 'Monsanto GMO litigation' and be afraid...<

And very sad , the anti GMO crowd refuse to allow better rice in many African countries.

2,000,000 kids are born BLIND every year from this stupidity.

I can not envision a worse life than to be blind in a country where folks earn $2.00 a day.

1 decade = 20,000,000 BLIND children , how these anti GMO folks can sleep at night is a mystery to me., tho no doubt they pat themselves on the back for saving the world. Right!
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 07:20 AM   #9
Curmudgeon
 
BaltimoreLurker's Avatar
 
City: Stoney Creek, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Moon Dance
Vessel Model: 1974 34' Marine Trader Sedan
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,629
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
>

1 decade = 20,000,000 BLIND children , how these anti GMO folks can sleep at night is a mystery to me., tho no doubt they pat themselves on the back for saving the world. Right!
The same way the anti DDT folks sleep.
BaltimoreLurker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 10:49 AM   #10
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Cygnus
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,373
Humans have been genetically modifying crops and livestock for most of our time on this planet. It took longer when you had to breed in the traits you wanted, generation after generation. But it's the same thing.

I have to side with FF on this one.

Anyone who wants to go back to a primitive, pre-technology society can volunteer to be one of the billions who will die of hunger or horrible diseases.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 07:48 PM   #11
Guru
 
MurrayM's Avatar
 
City: Kitimat, North Coast BC
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Badger
Vessel Model: 30' Sundowner Tug
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,321
Not quite the same when Antarctic fish genes end up in fruit...

Monsanto has an aggressively litigious history, blindsiding innocent farmers with lawsuits just because a small percentage of Monsanto's GM product somehow ended up in their fields.

Actually, I think genetic modification could save the Human species from what I call the "Human - Pine Siskin Equivalency".

Pine Siskin's are a small warbler sized bird that joins together in large flocks early in the spring up here on BC's north coast. One hundred or more will land on the highway and eat small pieces of gravel, which is used to grind the seeds they eat.

The Siskin's are slow to react however, and when a vehicle drives through dozens can be killed or injured. The flock will rise up as the vehicle passes, and settle right back to where the dead and dying lay strewn on the pavement.

It's brutal to slowly drive through the carnage, trying not to drive over the corpses, and watch in your rear view mirror as another vehicle goes through at highway speed. Bodies ricochet off the windshield, then the flock will settle right back in the same place.

Humans are just like that, aren't we? You'd think we would be smart enough to control ourselves, cooperate, maintain our population, and protect our habitat, the Earth.

Just like Pine Siskin's though, we're doomed to repeat our mistakes despite the devastation and carnage right before our eyes.

Our hope may lie in the genetic code of Bonobo Chimpanzees.

Bonobo's will share food with other Bonobo's they have never met before. Groups of Bonobo's that meet in the forest will not fight, but will intermingle and groom each other. Then there's their most famous quirk of settling socially stressful situations with sex.

Our aggressive nature, driven by our genetic past, was important in pushing Neanderthal's aside and for acquiring fertile hunting and gathering territory, but is of no use in our modern world.

I'm all for splicing a wee bit of the Bonobo's peaceful nature into our genetic makeup, especially if it nudges the aggressiveness out.
__________________
"The most interesting path between two points is not a straight line" Murray Minchin
MurrayM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2013, 07:57 PM   #12
Guru
 
City: somewhere
Country: USA
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 1,356
There is currently legislation in congress to hold Monsanto above the law. No matter what they do they cannot be prosecuted.

This is not the America I belong to...

Wtf?
__________________
Life is a Beach
beachbum29 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2013, 05:35 AM   #13
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 16,524
:There is currently legislation in congress to hold Monsanto above the law. No matter what they do they cannot be prosecuted.:

You mean like congress and most gov agencies and :workers:?

The IRS babe effectivly helped to rig an election , so instead of prison , she gets $100,000 a year FOREVER!
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:31 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012