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Old 03-29-2017, 08:21 AM   #1
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12 hour flight advise

Ive never done more than 8 hours nonstop so, Id appreciate some tips on before, during and after flight to combat jet lag.

12 hours trans Pacific.
If it matters, depart Vancouver 0200 local, arrive Taipei 0500 local, next day.
10 days on the ground.
Depart Taipei 2300 local, arrive Vancouver 1900 local, same day.
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Old 03-29-2017, 08:31 AM   #2
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Going over, sleep on the flight. You have enough time, provided you can get comfortable, to get a good sleep and be awake when you arrive in the AM. If possible, business class makes all the difference since you get something that somewhat resembles a bed.

On arrival, operate on local time. Make yourself stay up until more or less normal local bed time, then sleep until normal local wake time. I find that melatonin (over the counter) really helps you sleep when you want to where your internal clock is otherwise prone to wake you up.

On return, sleep, but not as much, recognizing that you will arrive home near local bed time, and will want to get back on a local sleep schedule. Once again Melatonin will go a long way to get you back on the local sleep schedule. I usually take melatonin for 2-3 days to get myself on a local schedule.
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Old 03-29-2017, 08:55 AM   #3
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Thanks Peter, all good points and while business class would be nice, I have at least moved up 1 notch from economy.

I've been getting lots of conflicting advice as far as drugs, food and drink, particularly in the days before. Thought maybe with a lot of long haulers here I might get at least some consensus.

I'm not big on pills and Gravol seems to be a pretty widely used, low key sleep aid.
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Old 03-29-2017, 09:51 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
Going over, sleep on the flight. You have enough time, provided you can get comfortable, to get a good sleep and be awake when you arrive in the AM....

On arrival, operate on local time. Make yourself stay up until more or less normal local bed time, then sleep until normal local wake time...
.
Agree

If they serve a meal on the way over I usually eat (light) and avoid any caffeine. I also take a mild sleep aid to help get a decent rest...something like AlevePM or AdvilPM seems to work for me.

You Definitely want to get on local time ASAP both ways - resist any urge to catch a nap - force staying up to get on local time is a big key. Better to go to bed a little early going over than napping.
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Old 03-29-2017, 12:14 PM   #5
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Skip the flight, use Star Treks transporter....


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Old 03-29-2017, 12:44 PM   #6
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My 67 year old friend just had a stroke right after a flight back from Australia, his advice was to get up and move around as much as possible.

Probably depending on age, conditioning, circulation problems and seating, you have to see which is better for you.

Me, I might cat nap but would get up every couple hours for a 15 minute walk/stretch.
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Old 03-29-2017, 01:21 PM   #7
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My 67 year old friend just had a stroke right after a flight back from Australia, his advice was to get up and move around as much as possible.

Agree. Our employer's travel training suggested standing often, walking a btt (as much as might be practical), and periodic light stretching exercises (again, as much as practical). Mostly exercising in place, but also any other movement you can incorporate. Blood circulation is good!

All that about adapting to local time as quickly as possible is right on, too.

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Old 03-29-2017, 01:27 PM   #8
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Greetings,
You can buy elastic type socks that are supposed to minimize blood pooling in the legs (deep vein thrombosis I think it's called).
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Old 03-29-2017, 03:46 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by RT Firefly
You can buy elastic type socks that are supposed to minimize blood pooling in the legs (deep vein thrombosis I think it's called).
I believe one has to be predisposed to DVT for it to be an issue. Also seems like use of flight socks has been pretty much debunked. Since they need to flex to force the blood back up the legs, that only occurs during exercise. Walking and in seat exercises are key. As is hydration.

I've been told to double or triple water intake in the days leading up to a long flight like this, eat trail mix or granola bars etc. on the flight. Someone said dried bananas but it like cardboard much better.

Was hoping the flight crews on here could toss out some tips. No Sunnwing crews though, thank you very much.
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Old 03-29-2017, 05:00 PM   #10
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One thing catches you up on time zone changes, the other directly affects circulation...I would go with what could kill me whether I know whether I am susceptible or not.
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Old 03-29-2017, 06:33 PM   #11
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I don't medicate. I agree that sucking it up and adapting to the time zone makes it easier. I just pretend I'm working a night shift.

I do try to get exit row seats. On some planes (most Airbuses, and 787) you get lots of room to get up a stretch in the exit row.

PS I was very impressed with the noticable increased comfort of a 787 on a recent flight. Lower cabin altitude (higher pressure) and higher cabin humidity made for a much more comfortable flight. Hope you got one of those over or return. I may make future travel arrangements based on the 787.
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Old 03-29-2017, 07:19 PM   #12
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I have done a lot of long haul, Australia to North America or Europe. I avoid all drugs (sleep aid, melatonin) but do have a glass of wine with the meal. In other words, keep everything as normal as you do at home.

Walking around isn't really practical - focus on in-seat exercises. Watch a movie or two, that really helps the time fly by. Sleep as much as you can while the cabin lights are dimmed. It isn't always easy, invariably there is someone who is turning their overhead light on or off quite a lot.

On arrival try to get some exercise - walk around some shopping malls or a few blocks along the streets. Many of my flights had multiple legs and ended up about 24 hours or so door to hotel. I did Brisbane-LA-Toronto quite a few times in early March for a conference. That is a long way. Seldom above zero outside on arrival as well. The routine there was stay at the Sheraton, use 'The Path' to get close to the Hard Rock Cafe, have a big pile of Ribs and a few beers for dinner and then wander the Path for a while. Usually woke up for breakfast in good shape! Its the third night that's the most difficult to sleep right through, definitely stay up reasonably late on that one.
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Old 03-29-2017, 07:24 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Spy;
I just pretend I'm working a night shift.
I was thinking of that. I put in a lot of nights and even double shifts in the steam plant in Powell River. Noisier than a jet and we even learned to sleep standing up. No time zones though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Spy;
I do try to get exit row seats. On some planes (most Airbuses, and 787) you get lots of room to get up a stretch in the exit row.
I got decent seats and might even do better when they unblock a bunch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Spy;
I was very impressed with the noticable increased comfort of a 787...Hope you got one of those over or return.
747-400. There were 787s with other airlines but they did a milk run and it would have been 30 or more hours.
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Old 03-29-2017, 07:38 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Insequent;
I have done a lot of long haul...keep everything as normal as you do at home. Walking around isn't really practical - focus on in-seat exercises. Watch a movie or two, that really helps the time fly by. Sleep as much as you can while the cabin lights are dimmed.
Thanks Brian. I am normally an easy to sleep guy and think leaving at 2am and arriving at 5am should work in my favour. I have a bunch of movies that will probably help me sleep. Got a blindfold and plugs too. I'll be busy when I get there and it will be 30 degrees so I'll need some decent sleep on the plane.
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Old 03-30-2017, 01:53 AM   #15
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I travel a lot, and always have had trouble sleeping on the planes and then adjusting to the time zone change.
My best "med" so far is a delicacy from Colorado, a chocolate with a slightly earthy flavor, Oh, are we there already?
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Old 03-30-2017, 02:11 AM   #16
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Ya wanna know the secret of successful air travel? After you get where you're going, ya take off your shoes and socks. Then ya walk around on the rug barefoot and make fists with your toes.
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Old 03-30-2017, 03:47 AM   #17
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There's lots of ways to make long travel tolerable, but still takes effort. I used to travel Chicago Hong Kong twice a month as a crew member. My mantra was to go take the first sleep break tired (departed around 2pm local) and it was like getting up early for the last half of the trip. At Hong Kong I'd relax, light dinner and go to bed Hong Kong time around 10 to 11pm. Wake up when rested.

Water is your friend, drink at least a few quarts. No alcohol, and don't eat heavy. Blinders and ear plugs help a lot. And if your seat doesn't recline a lot or no pillows provided, bring your own.

And absolutely exercise a bit. You don't have to walk around, but do get up and stretch and work the muscles a bit. Maybe grab a flight attendant for a dance.

Know how your circadian clock works. Some folks are early birds (I am) and some at night owls. Try to adjust you schedule to match. I find it MUCH easier to get up early than to stay up late.

I suspect your trip is not a whole lot different than mine, except your departure time at 2 am is brutally early, and I'd certainly spend the previous day or two getting up really early, or staying up really late to adjust.

Traveling west (to the east) is much easier than traveling to Europe for some reason.

On these long international trips, unless you spend time to adjust, I'd not make any serious financial decisions nor operate a chain saw.
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Old 03-30-2017, 06:12 PM   #18
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From Australia to Europe is around 22 hours flying time, plus at least one stopover to change planes or refuel/service the aircraft. So we are used to it, first leg, using an Asian based carrier is 8-9 hours,second around 13 hours.
Don`t over eat, or drink lots of alcohol. Stay hydrated, ask for water etc if not offered regularly. Try to sleep, sometimes I just doze, I`m never sure. Walking around is not a real option, except at the refuel/change planes stop. If you can take a shower at the stopover do. Don`t be tempted to eat a big meal on the second flight if you ate not long ago on the last one.
I`m past long haul in economy/coach, extending the seat flat and going to sleep works best. Use an eye mask and earplugs, noise cancelling headphones if possible. I shop hard for good pricing up the front, there are deals, lots of competition on international flights. And I like the 787,new quiet, better "air", space etc.
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Old 03-30-2017, 10:26 PM   #19
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I second what seevee says - hydration and disposable foam ear plugs. The air is very dry, and the noise is remarkably fatiguing. Ear plugs also tend to keep the chatty folks at bay, and they take the edge off any screaming children.

Safe Travels
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Old 03-30-2017, 11:32 PM   #20
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Minimal alcohol. Acclimatize yourself to local time..stay awake till local bed time.
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