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Old 09-25-2013, 04:49 PM   #21
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I have a 32' boat, 100' 3/8" chain and a 35# anchor.
I have hauled it by hand several times and that grows tiresome really fast particularily if the boat ends up where I don't want it or I have to reset due to bottom conditions

Keep in mind that your boat will have windage , a lot more than mine and even though you may power into the wind to reduce anchor load you will still have additional resistance to manual hauling. Enough maybe to make it nearly impossible to get free.

Go with a powered windlass And be sure it can be operated manually as a safety.
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Old 09-25-2013, 08:34 PM   #22
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(Lindatboating--- sent a Private Message re windlass type)
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Old 09-25-2013, 09:24 PM   #23
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If you had an all-rope rode for a 35-pound anchor and are young and in good shape, you could probably get by without a windlass. But with your current anchor chain, you're much better off with a powered windlass.

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Old 09-25-2013, 10:29 PM   #24
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No one has yet mentioned speed. If you are caught dragging in stinky weather and need to re-set in a hurry, the powered windlass can be the difference between an uncomfortable experience and a disaster.
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:55 AM   #25
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I think everyone is in agreement that a windlass is pretty much a necessity on a boat that size. Its just a question of what type.

Even on my 30 ft boat, I wouldn't be without a windlass. I have a 38lb anchor with a vertical electric driven capstan. The capstan is fine for my rode but I pull the last 20 ft of chain by hand. This alone is a challenge when on my own in rough seas. I plan on solving this problem by rigging up a pulley back at the pilothouse so I can get the anchor to surface before the chain gets to the capstan.
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Old 09-26-2013, 12:01 PM   #26
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I agree with everyone, once you go power you never go back. If it's a cost issue, some manufacturers have reconditioned models with warranties, just a thought.
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Old 09-26-2013, 01:42 PM   #27
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I like to believe I am a tough guy. But trying to haul 100 plus pounds of ground tackle up and in some kind of order on deck sucks and takes the breath out of you.

Go power.

I went away from hydraulic to electric. I will use my anchor to hold the boat off rocks and what not if I have issues with the power ( ie emergency parking break ). In a single powered vessel its nice to be able to haul that gear if the engine will not run. Even for a tow. Jumper cables can be a real friend in such moments as well.

YMMV
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Old 09-26-2013, 04:06 PM   #28
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[QUOTE=OFB;181293 I will use my anchor to hold the boat off rocks and what not if I have issues with the power ( ie emergency parking break ). In a single powered vessel its nice to be able to haul that gear if the engine will not run.
YMMV[/QUOTE]

I was just thinking that also. While cruising in Germany, we were renting the Euro 400 diesel trawlers (43') with hydraulic bow thruster and windlass. It made a heck of a noise, but it was a great performer. Trouble was that if the engine gave out while docking, one didn't have the thrusters to move bow or stern. The real plus was that you could run that thruster for a couple of minutes with no issue except maybe a little heat. One boat we rented also had the Nanni/Peachment Hydraulic drive, which was little more than the same hydraulic setup with thru-transom mounted hydraulic motor and the pressure lines going through a directional flow changing valve at the helm. This was a sweetheart of a setup for renters that were hard on transmissions and shafts. You could go from full throttle fwd. and pull the valve right through the gate to full throttle reverse without blinking an eye. I'm sure it wasn't the pinnacle in efficiency (getting HP to the prop), but I bet it saved many a euro's worth of trannies. I still think that a well thought-out electric windlass with proper sized cables and better yet, a battery near the bow, is the most economical, reliable combo for the money. If I went hydraulic for one item like windlass or bow thruster, I'd go all the way.
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Old 09-27-2013, 06:00 AM   #29
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>Trouble was that if the engine gave out while docking, one didn't have the thrusters to move bow or stern.<

And the last time that happened was?
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Old 09-27-2013, 12:56 PM   #30
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>Trouble was that if the engine gave out while docking, one didn't have the thrusters to move bow or stern.<

And the last time that happened was?
True, I haven't been involved in such an incident, but don't forget that I'm talking about rental trawlers here. In the few deep locks where the lock master requested engines to be shut off during full capacity, line etiquette and handling was sometimes hard to believe. Bumper-car like effects ensued. Captains with electric thrusters could attempt to compensate for the terrible line handling of their first mate. The rental company owner told us that this is where the bulk of damage to his rentals occurred. Still, overall, the hydraulic systems had the advantage over the electric, and the occasional bump and break is written-off as part of the cost of doing business.

Although Europe requires more training for boat handling than we do here, my Admiral and I were astounded with the terrible boat handling there. I have to admit that the hydraulic thruster did save us at least once when we exited a lock and a gust hit us broadside, sending us dangerously close to the opposing lock traffic. I had to lay on that thruster for 30 seconds or more to keep the bow straight. With no keel, a flat bottom and a small rudder, I had to use it. Woops...sorry if I drifted off here a little.
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Old 09-27-2013, 02:26 PM   #31
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My Maxwell 2200 VWC windlass needs a full service and this is one item I have not performed before.

The on line manual from Maxwell breaks down the individual components but does not give detailed instructions on servicing.

It doesnt appear to be a too dificult a job but I would appreciate input from others who have performed this service.

Thanks
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Old 09-28-2013, 05:44 AM   #32
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>Although Europe requires more training for boat handling than we do here,<

ZERO demonstrated boat handling skill is required to be a commercial <captian> in the US.
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Old 12-05-2013, 02:32 AM   #33
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I liked reading through this thread. One thing I'm thinking lately to spend my money on is to upgrade my windlass. Now I have an old Powerwinch.


Which to be honest I haven't used much.
But I'd like to do something like this:

Or this:



I'm thinking of going the Lewmar H2 like this:
Horizontal Windlasses products

Comments?
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Old 12-05-2013, 07:27 AM   #34
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With no coral in a lake a 5 ft hunk of chain and proper sized nylon should do just fine.

The hand job can be a 2 speed like a SL 555 , so you have a 10-1 for fast and a 40-1 for slow recovery.

A small electric job Capstan style (vertical drum) with the line just tailed on deck would be easier to live with than going thru the whole chain locker and down feed exercise.The nylon on deck is faster to deploy , and doesnt stink below while drying.

Remember unless the windlass is a monstrous over size , hundreds of pounds it is NOT to hold the boat while anchored , simply to get the anchor gear back aboard.
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:17 AM   #35
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If you're the sort who has to do things the hard way, a manual windlass is the way to go. If you normally do things the modern way (like a washer and dryer instead of beating your clothes on a rock in the river and hanging them on tree limbs to dry), you'll be much happier with a powered windlass.

My boat came with a manual windlass and it took me just a very few times of raising the anchor to decide to install a powered windlass.

In rough seas, would you rather hang on to a rail and push a button with your foot or try to winch up an anchor and chain by hand?
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Old 12-28-2013, 02:35 PM   #36
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dhmeissner,
I would do fine w your capstan as I use 5/8ths nylon w 15' of chain (12' of 5/16ths and 3' of 3/8ths) and anchors weighing (most of the time) not over 22lbs. I pull the rode w the winch till I get to the chain and pull the chain by hand. If you used a Manson Supreme 25lb anchor you would do as well and I've never dragged. You are probably younger than me and could easily pull a bit more chain as well.

How does the Powerwinch work?
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Old 12-28-2013, 03:34 PM   #37
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Hydraulic - this is an old shot of mine, it's shinier now and the Danforth is toast.

The bottom box is a locker with a spare rode in case the main one goes south.
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Old 12-28-2013, 06:06 PM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gwkiwi View Post
My Maxwell 2200 VWC windlass needs a full service ... The on line manual from Maxwell breaks down the individual components but does not give detailed instructions on servicing.It doesn`t appear to be a too difficult a job but I would appreciate input from others who have performed this service.
You might get some help from the Muir site, Muir - Here for the long haul - The World Power In Anchoring Systems - Storm, Atlantic, Compact Winches. It gives step by step instructions for servicing. There may be differences but I suspect there is one way to build a winch.
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Old 12-28-2013, 07:23 PM   #39
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Man, I'm going with everyone else on this one. Power only (your choice elect/hyd).

I'm 57 and in pretty good condition. Having hauled up more than a couple of anchors in my day on both big and small boats, and being the designated deck ape on my buddy's center console when we're out, I regularly haul and set the anchor. Since we usually were not in a hurry, I considered it another form of "Primal" training.

Unfortunately, a few months ago doing crossfit, I sustained a decent rotator cuff injury.
I can tell you that on many occasions since, I've dreaded the hauling up part of the equation, and it's a relatively light anchor.

Never thought such a piddly little injury could be such a pain!

So again, as we age, or in the event of an injury, a power unit is going to be worth it's weight in gold!

Just my buck-fiddy on the matter.

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Old 12-28-2013, 08:12 PM   #40
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I just changed my Maxwell windlass by a bran new one. Off duty, if you are interested, J still bave the old one working
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