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Old 05-29-2013, 10:05 PM   #41
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portager,
I agree w you. A Navy anchor and a Dreadnought have a "palm" that is shaped like a "pad" and causes drag that tends to rotate the flukes into the bottom. This way the fluke tips weigh more than they weigh ...... that is the downward force on the fluke tips in action is more than their own weight.
I noticed the only time I used my Dreadnought that it set so quickly the whole setting process seemed to not even exist. I started to back and instantly the anchor line was very tight.
I saw a Danforth that had the palms reversed so they would dig in rather than slide up and over the bottom. It seemed to be manufactured that way. It looked like the palms would act like a hook and of course the "reaction" from hooking no doubt turned the flukes down toward the bottom.

So it seems there are 2 ways to help the fluke get started penetrating the bottom on anchors of this type.

The pic is for those unfamiliar w the Dreadnought.
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Old 05-30-2013, 11:02 AM   #42
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Another curious feature of the Claw is the twisted outboard flukes.

Looks to me as the designer did the twist to increase holding power and/or orient the "setting fluke" in such away that it would penetrate the bottom more easily for better setting.

Does the twist do one and not the other?

I've seen only one Claw that didn't have the twist and it was a welded home made Claw. See pic. The owner claimed it worked well but the PO was the home builder.
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Old 05-30-2013, 08:17 PM   #43
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Hi Eric
Here are some photos for you. Genuine Bruce anchors, big one a 20kg and little one a 2kg for the dinghy..........
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Old 05-30-2013, 11:02 PM   #44
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Mike your bottom photo shows more twist in the OB flukes. Post # 5, 16, 18, 20, 27, 29 and 36 don't show much twist in the OB flukes. The Claws in post # 25 and 26 show twist in the far side flukes only.

Mike ... in between your 1st and 2nd pic is the place where the twist brings the OB flukes into a position that is more at right angles to the advancing flukes and presents a greater resistance.

While setting the twisted OB flukes present a tip that is more at right angles to the direction of pull making the tips more chisel like do dig better (I think) but perhaps not to penetrate as well. I just don't know. But the anchor has a reputation for setting well so I'm guessing/assuming that the twist is there to help create more holding power.

I'm surprised no one has offered a Claw that departs noticeably in design from the Bruce. My original goal for this thread was to see if the best Claw could be identified. But perhaps there isn't enough difference to boil up.
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Old 05-31-2013, 09:53 AM   #45
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I think everybody agrees that your type of bottom will dictate the anchor. For us in So Cal we have sandy bottoms and kelp. I see mostly Danforth and CQR here and the Bruce on a few boats but we get Santa Ana winds that can pop up quickly and blow you ashore so the Bruce in sand with 60 kt winds is a bad scenario.
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Old 05-31-2013, 10:26 AM   #46
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Cap, The Santa Anna Wind is an offshore wind.
So I see no problem w that.

I think the best sand anchor is probably a Danforth.

And yes the bottom is the most important element in anchoring.
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Old 05-31-2013, 11:10 AM   #47
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It is off shore to the mainland but when you are at Catalina it is blowing you directly on shore. As you know, there is always a windward side and a lee side. Our coast is the windward side. We get surf and seas breaking our shores so we rarely anchor off our coast.

I would love to have it like your area here. We go immediately to unprotected water when we leave our harbors.
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Old 06-10-2013, 11:59 AM   #48
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Does anybody have any experience w the Sea Dog Line Claw anchors?
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Old 06-15-2013, 09:09 PM   #49
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If you are not sure use a bigger anchor.
here is a couple of photos of some anchors I found lying around the yard today.
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Old 06-16-2013, 07:02 AM   #50
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Does anybody have any experience w the Sea Dog Line Claw anchors?
We a have 30 Kg Sea Hook by Sea Dog (plow). It sits next to the 33Kg Rocna. We used the Sea Dog as our primary for 5 years but it doesn't set as fast or as well as the Rocna.
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Old 06-16-2013, 10:29 AM   #51
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Plow. As in CQR, Delta or ??

No big flaws just fair performance. That's how I read your post.

At least compared to a Rocna. What I was more interested in was how the Dog compared w other Claws. It looks like (in photos and in the galvanized flesh) to have a shorter than usual shank and wondered how that would effect performance.

The shank when pulled on rotates the anchor fluke/s vertical enough to allow easy extraction. If one cut a foot off the Claw shank (or even a bit more) and managed to get it set)) you'd probably have a real hard time getting it up (NPI). And if you didn't have real strong ground tackle and winch maybe you woudn't get it up at all.

And if you doubled the length of the shank the anchor may come up easily unless you had 10-1 scope.

The above should apply to all or at least most all other anchors.



Ben,
About the monster anchor. Do you think they are self righting? It looks as like if they were up-side-down they would stay that way. But w that very heavy fluke I would think it would be unlikely to wind up on their side. This is an interesting design and similar to many others except for the two pronged flukes and the double shanks.
I see they are bolted together and it looks like when unbolted they would become a bunch of sheet metal and given their size that would be a nice feature. In a trawler size a storm anchor stowed below?


rochepoint,
Re your post #43 the 2nd pic down I think shows why the holding power of the Claw is limited. Looks like it/they would just glide through a mud bottom like three knives. Of course if you lowered the shank some (much like your 1st pic) the OB flukes (because of their twist) would come closer to right angles to the rode and resist movement much better. The center fluke is attached to the shank at an angle and pulls the anchor down and resists too. I believe it's beneficial that the two OB flukes compress the bottom between eachother with basically no place to go.
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:52 PM   #52
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Plow. As in CQR, Delta or ??

It looks like a knock-off Bruce. I should have called it a claw.

No big flaws just fair performance. That's how I read your post.

The Rocna sets quickly in all conditions we have anchored in.

At least compared to a Rocna. What I was more interested in was how the Dog compared w other Claws. It looks like (in photos and in the galvanized flesh) to have a shorter than usual shank and wondered how that would effect performance.
Eric: We used a genuine CQR for 10 years and the only time we dragged was when we caught an abandoned net in AK. My fault for not adequately checking the set. The Sea Dog didn't always set easily or quickly in all bottom types where the Rocna does. If I had to rate the anchors we have used. Rocna #1, CQR #2 and the Sea Dog #3.
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Old 06-16-2013, 06:12 PM   #53
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Eric,
Yeah , anchors like that are usually lowered into position and then set.
These units have been used on small drilling platforms etc.
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Old 08-27-2013, 07:06 PM   #54
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The Bruce was developed to secure oil and gas rigs in the North Sea. A tug would deploy anchors with weights of many tons, sometimes setting three per corner and one or two mid ships of the rig. Once dropped the tug would use its power to set. Once set they were never recovered.
Yes the Bruce is a fine anchor but should never be used in on a Stoney bottom. I have witnessed boats dragging with Bruce and when the anchor was recovered the throat was full of a rock.
My favourite all round anchor is a trusty Northill, and it like the dean forth was developed for anchoring aircraft. Bill
Actually Bruce is still making anchors, just not for us.

Marty......................
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Old 12-30-2013, 08:14 AM   #55
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Isn't "Bruce" a brand name?

My boat came with an unbranded claw anchor. It never let me down but it was slightly bent and a size smaller than the maximum for my pulpit so I replaced it with a larger Lewmar claw anchor.
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