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Old 05-28-2013, 12:45 AM   #21
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Ray's (Giggitoni's) GB42 sports both CQR and Bruce on the bow: it's not just a sailboat thing.
Uh oh Ray. That cat is outta the bag now. Let the record show I was not the one to tell anybody.
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Old 05-28-2013, 01:22 AM   #22
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I am glad this thread got started. We went through the Locks Saturday morning and were behind a huge tug. I took this picture just because I had never seen two anchor on the stern of a tug before (there was one on each stern corner). Now I have a place to post it! Big anchors, the shank is about 7-8 feet!
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Old 05-28-2013, 03:11 AM   #23
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Uh oh Ray. That cat is outta the bag now. Let the record show I was not the one to tell anybody.
At least it's a real Bruce!
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Old 05-28-2013, 11:42 AM   #24
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"A real Bruce?"

I've always thought one or two Claws quite likely are better than the original Bruce. If we had stuck w the original car or airplane we'd be way in the past. The assumption that nothing will ever be better than the original Claw is very short sighted in my opinion. The Bruce was forged as pointed out by Spy but I've seen quite a few Claws bent a lot so I know thFey aren't brittle but then one can ask "were they bent from great force or were they weak. I'd guess great force as all the bent one's I've seen were on fish boats.

I have noticed many Claws have longer and more slender flukes but most have short and fat stubs for flukes. All have twist in the outbd flukes and I have some ideas about that twist but want other opinions on the twist. I thought it was one thing and then decided it was another. What?????

I've not noticed any real difference in shanks except there is slight differences in the height of the vertical part and the angle of the arm and it's attachment angle to the fluke. Actually I think it's not the shank angles that matter but the angle of the rode attach point to the center of surface area of the flukes that's important.

Who has a Claw w longer skinnier flukes? I'd like to know what brand/brands make a Claw that way or w more or less twist in the outbd flukes.

Anybody notice any other differences in Claw type anchors?
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Old 05-28-2013, 12:36 PM   #25
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Anybody notice any other differences in Claw type anchors?
20 kg Force
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Old 05-28-2013, 02:07 PM   #26
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Mine's a Lewmar Claw.

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Old 05-28-2013, 02:13 PM   #27
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Mine's most likely a Chinese knock-off; definitely not original Bruce.

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Old 05-28-2013, 07:28 PM   #28
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20 kg Force
And blinding, shiny stainless steel.
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Old 05-28-2013, 08:29 PM   #29
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Our is the real McCoy...
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Old 05-28-2013, 09:41 PM   #30
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Look at Mike's Bruce and see that the shank slants actually backwards from the fluke whereas w most all other anchors the shank slants fwd so the mud and sand tends to lift the anchor up and out of the bottom. Of course the fluke overpowers the rising shank so it dosn't rise at all on anchors like the Rocna and Delta but the rising force reduces the tendency for the fluke to bury itself. Once the shanks are buried the Claws shank will resist burying further but not nearly as much as w most anchors.

What an anchor does is the sum of the forces involved.
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Old 05-28-2013, 10:11 PM   #31
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I love Walt's bright anchor. I guess it's stainless steel. High carbon steels are usually stronger than stainless so I'm wondering if the pretty SS anchors suffer from lack of strength.

They cost so much money I'd prolly use a trip line if I had one. But speaking of the trip line .... on a Claw many boaters like charter fishing boats in Alaska secure the rode to the trip line attach point, run it along the upper shank to the normal rode attach point and simply use a weak link like wire or small dia line to attach to the end of the shank. So the anchor acts normally until it gets stuck and then the weak link breaks and the rode pulls the Claw out backwards. Fine for some applications (like fishing for an hour) but not for overnight anchoring.

It looks to me like the trip line attach hole is in a good spot.

Fly, those Lewmar's are very popular in SE Alaska. And it looks to me like your Lewmar's shank is considerably longer than Walt's Force. That in itself could be a significant difference in the performance of one Claw over another.
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Old 05-28-2013, 11:09 PM   #32
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Eric, you're not the first one to tell me that! I have it on good authority that my shank is, in fact, longer than Walt's. I've never done a side-by-side comparison, though. Maybe Walt can add to the discussion.



But not to worry, Walt. Momma always told me it's the angle of the dangle that counts...and I think Eric's previous analysis of catenary proved that.

Next time I'm at the boat, I can measure the length of my claw.
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Old 05-28-2013, 11:12 PM   #33
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Truth be told, my claw is 15kg and Walt's weighs 5kg more. It might just be a matter of perspective.
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Old 05-28-2013, 11:33 PM   #34
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I love Walt's bright anchor. I guess it's stainless steel. High carbon steels are usually stronger than stainless so I'm wondering if the pretty SS anchors suffer from lack of strength.
It's not so much an issue of strength as it is ductility, the ability of a material to withstand elastic deformation without breaking. Elastic deformation is when a material gets to the point of bending or stretching when the material will no longer go back to its original shape, it has been permanently deformed. Elastic deformation is the range of bending or stretching where the material will return to its original shape.

SS does not like deformation as much as other carbon steels. Something tells me Walt's anchor will serve him well. Putting obvious cost issues aside though, you'll be less likely to find SS used in work boat anchors due to ductility issues.
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Old 05-29-2013, 09:53 AM   #35
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I'd say this one's been "permanently deformed".
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Old 05-29-2013, 10:19 AM   #36
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I have it on good authority that my shank is, in fact, longer than Walt's.
I don't know how you could possibly know that from looking at photos.
I ask my wife if my shank was long enough and she just laughed & said she had nothing to compare it to. I also have an old 15kg Bruce in the lazarette whos shank is considerably shorter than my SS. Remember, it's just not the length of the shank, it's the penetration that's important.
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Old 05-29-2013, 03:39 PM   #37
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The landing craft's kedging Danforth has weird palms. I've seen it before and don't understand it at all. Most are shaped so as to make the aft end of the anchor rise up to orient the flukes to dig in. But this one (and I've seen others) look like to they are designed to dig in and not particularly to cause the aft end of the anchor to rise at all.
Anybody have any ideas?
I think the palms are designed to dig into or hook on the seabed as the anchor drags, which will produce a moment or torque around the pivot point and point the flukes into the seabed.
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Old 05-29-2013, 05:37 PM   #38
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I'd say this one's been "permanently deformed".


No, I believe that that is the new BRUSAROC asymmetric anchor.

Half of it was forged in North America and the other half somewhere Down Under. (Rumors of Chinese metalurgy being involved are false).

It was designed by a joint committee, half of whose members came from each region.

Extensive and exhaustive recent tests conclusively show that exactly half the time it sets better than any other anchor heretofore known to man. The other half of the time it just hops across the seafloor making a weird bleating, baahing sound.
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Old 05-29-2013, 07:05 PM   #39
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I found this spec sheet for the Lewmar Claws. Note that the SS specs vary in all areas from the galvanized specs for same weight anchors. The galv anchors are longer and taller while the SS models are wider. Also, the SS shanks taper toward the tip but the galv shanks are a uniform thickness.
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Old 05-29-2013, 07:14 PM   #40
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I found this spec sheet for the Lewmar Claws. Note that the SS specs vary in all areas from the galvanized specs for same size anchors. The galv anchors are longer and taller while the SS models are wider. Also, the SS shanks taper toward the tip but the galv shanks are a uniform thickness.
Stop with the straight lines Al and Walt. I'm having a hard time restraining myself.
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