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Old 06-16-2012, 04:43 PM   #1
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Thoughts on Anchors

I had this anchor on my 28ft Wellcraft and it worked great however on my trawler is looks small for some reason. The trawler is 24ft 10 ft beam and shallow draft about 28 inches, she only weighs in around 7500 lbs not sure how much more i have added. the anchor i have now is a Lewmar 22lb. Claw Anchor for Boats 31'35', 21-1/4"L x 14-3/16"W x 11-1/4"H - I also have a 22lb. Traditional Anchor, 28' to 40' Boat Length, 1,500lb. SWL, 35-1/2"L x 27-1/4"W, 18-1/2" Fluke Length both have the same chain and line combo. the claw anchor seems to set faster and harder than the Traditional Bruce anchor. and when the windless brings it in, it is self righting and never needs any attention as i have a automatic lock on the chain.Around here we have mostly sandy bottoms but i do cruise down the coast into Fla. Any input would be Great.
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Old 06-16-2012, 04:57 PM   #2
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Well, if you like claw-type anchors the Lewmar and the Bruce seem sized right for you, at least on paper. If you are anchoring in mostly sandy bottoms I think there are better choices in terms of holding power. The Danforth design (as in Danforth and Fortress) is generally rated at or near the top of the chart in terms of holding power once it's set. Other anchors, like the Claw/Bruce may often set faster or easier than a Danforth-type but their holding power is not nearly as great once they are set.

But your boat is pretty light in the overall scheme of things. I don't know how much windage it has but at 24' feet I imagine it's not going to have all that much. So it would seem to me that the anchors you have now should work fine for you under the majority of conditions you'll be encountering.
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Old 06-16-2012, 05:06 PM   #3
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Thanks Marin i have another Danforth that was used on my dads 40ft, Sport fisher i may look at it, see what size it is and if it will work with my anchor roller and chain lock. As i rebuild this boat i keep second guessing alot of things to make life easier and better, IE: dingy davits my buddy is building will double as a Hammock hanger and a frame for canvas over the rear deck area ! one day at a time !
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Old 06-16-2012, 08:45 PM   #4
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Don't know if your boat is going to have a swim step but you might consider carrying the Danforth on a swimstep or transom mount to use under conditions when it would be the best choice. A Danforth/Fortress is a lot easier to stow or carry than the rather clumsy one-piece anchors like claws, plows, spades, rollbars, etc.

The photo below is not ideal for illustrating this but it shows our Fortress stern anchor, which with its rode is sized to be the main anchor for the boat, in its mount on the swimstep and transom. This installation was in place when we bought the boat. All we did was change the smaller but very heavy no-name (and bent) Danforth knock-off for the Fortress.
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Old 06-17-2012, 09:42 AM   #5
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Roger that Marin i have a danforth Mount that came from the deck of my dads boat. i could do that. I would do the double front mount if i decide to do that. or on the swim step. Ideas i am always looking for a better way or easier way to do anything.
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Old 06-18-2012, 12:05 PM   #6
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I had this anchor on my 28ft Wellcraft and it worked great however on my trawler is looks small for some reason. The trawler is 24ft 10 ft beam and shallow draft about 28 inches, she only weighs in around 7500 lbs not sure how much more i have added. the anchor i have now is a Lewmar 22lb. Claw Anchor for Boats 31'–35', 21-1/4"L x 14-3/16"W x 11-1/4"H - I also have a 22lb. Traditional Anchor, 28' to 40' Boat Length, 1,500lb. SWL, 35-1/2"L x 27-1/4"W, 18-1/2" Fluke Length both have the same chain and line combo. the claw anchor seems to set faster and harder than the Traditional Bruce anchor. and when the windless brings it in, it is self righting and never needs any attention as i have a automatic lock on the chain.Around here we have mostly sandy bottoms but i do cruise down the coast into Fla. Any input would be Great.
HIGH COTTON had a 22 lb generic claw anchor on it when I bought it and it served me well and I suspect served the previous owner as well. It never failed to set and it never dragged.

Before my recent cruise I replaced it with a 33 lb Lewmar claw anchor, just for insurance and because I was able to buy it for $60 instead of $109 from West Marine with a price match. Actually, a cupon brought it down to $45.00.

Since I never had a problem with the 22 lb claw, I can't say the 33 lb version is an improvement, but there is a degree of "peace of mind" in having it.

HIGH COTTON is a bit more boat than you have so I expect you'll be fine with what you have. Anchoring is as much technique as it is equipment so study Chapman Piloting and other resources on anchoring techniques.
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Old 06-18-2012, 08:21 PM   #7
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Anchoring is as much technique as it is equipment so study Chapman Piloting and other resources on anchoring techniques.
Dropping my claw using a pedal.

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Old 06-20-2012, 10:43 AM   #8
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Thanks Rwidman the lewmar seemed to work well on my 28ftr , I like that any way it lands its on the either side and the claw/Flukes pull it and rotate it around into the 100% upright and the harder it pulls the deeper is digs. On long weekends it would dig in so that i would use the windless to take in the slack as i bumped forward then when the chain was almost a 90, it would release and up she would come. We also do whats called the island anchor around here in some of the narrow areas drop a stern anchor play out plenty of line drop the front and take in the rear as you back down. Then when you have scope right tie off the rear. Pull the bow tighter and there you have a boat thats not swinging with the wind or tide and other boaters can motor past with out worry about your lines or running aground.
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Old 06-20-2012, 06:37 PM   #9
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In my area, I have to anchor where there are strong reversing tidal currents. Even when the current reverses and the boat swings, the anchor doesn't drag. Of course, I make sure it's well set by backing down on it under power.

I use my GPS anchor drag alarm but the only time it sounds is if I haven't accounted for the scope.
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Old 07-10-2012, 12:19 AM   #10
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Almost finished with the Anchor detail, 35 ft of chain , the 5/8 strand rope 250ft, the Lewmar 22lb, I am welding a 9 Lb piece of bar stock to the back strap of the Anchor just for piece of mind, for the stern anchor i have a 22lb danforth that i am mounting on the swim platform, and i have area in the stern on the inside for a locker to hold 150 ft of rope and maybe 15 ft of chain,
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Old 07-10-2012, 07:56 AM   #11
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Almost finished with the Anchor detail, 35 ft of chain , the 5/8 strand rope 250ft, the Lewmar 22lb, I am welding a 9 Lb piece of bar stock to the back strap of the Anchor just for piece of mind, for the stern anchor i have a 22lb danforth that i am mounting on the swim platform, and i have area in the stern on the inside for a locker to hold 150 ft of rope and maybe 15 ft of chain,
Why would you weld metal to the anchor? This is something that's already been designed tested and used by thousands of boaters. Adding metal changes the design and you have no way of knowing if this is an improvement, accomplishes nothing, or actually degrades performance.

If you think you need a heavier anchor, buy a heavier anchor.
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Old 07-10-2012, 09:58 AM   #12
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Not the heavy anchor that i need after working on this project, It is enough weight to pull the shank and the chain from the locker when i release the lock and reverse the wilndless, The boat design has a high bow and its just enough to stop all of the anchors from self deploying. So i started with each anchor and found i only need about 3 lbs to make the Lewmar claw work and it is the easiest one to modify. In the early 1900's captains would take and add lead to the setting end of anchors to make them dig in harder bottoms. The only reason i know about that is here in North Carolina shrimpers and Clam dredges catch old anchors that were lost and about 1/2 of them have that lead mass on the bottom of the shank.
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Old 07-10-2012, 01:41 PM   #13
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Self-deploying is actually a good thing to my way of thinking. It's one of the things we really like about our Rocna, as opposed to our Bruce, which wasn't.

On the pulpit our anchor is kept in place by a short keeper line that has a chain hook on one end. The other end of the line is secured to the cleat on top of the windlass. So deploying the anchor is simply a matter of taking up the slack in the anchor chain, removing the keeper line, and powering out on the windlass. The anchor slides nicely over the bow roller and that's that. With the Bruce I had to shove the anchor forward on the pulpit until it reached the tipping point.

The photo is an old one. I have since fabricated a taller bronze bail or keeper for the front of the pulpit. The original bail kept the Rocna from tipping back any farther so the end of the shank was stuck up in the air like this. Now, while the end of the shank is still in the air, it's not nearly as high. The bungee keeps the anchor shank from swaying back and forth. It is being replaced with a simple, notched teak block.
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Old 07-10-2012, 02:10 PM   #14
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How about a bungee sling to help push the anchor out of the pulpit, when the windlass is switched on to payout the rode.Just a passing idear.How many people actually pin/lock their anchor in place while underway?
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Old 07-10-2012, 02:39 PM   #15
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How about a bungee sling to help push the anchor out of the pulpit, when the windlass is switched on to payout the rode.Just a passing idear.How many people actually pin/lock their anchor in place while underway?
A lot of people that are transiting open water more than 100 feet deep (or water deeper than you can anchor in)...
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Old 07-10-2012, 02:40 PM   #16
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Since I have to go to the bow to release the line that secures the anchor while underway, pushing it off the pulpit isn't really much of a big deal for me. I would be more concerned with upseting the design of the anchor by modifying it.
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Old 07-10-2012, 02:42 PM   #17
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.............How many people actually pin/lock their anchor in place while underway?
I do.

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Old 07-10-2012, 05:49 PM   #18
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I do...and it's self-launching.

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Old 07-10-2012, 09:20 PM   #19
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I note in Marin`s windlass pic, a line secured to the cleat of the windlass casing. It is very convenient to use it,but I`ve been warned against using it long term to secure say,a mooring line on strength grounds, so usually avoid using it, even for the snubber line when anchored. Any thoughts/experiences? BruceK
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Old 07-10-2012, 10:11 PM   #20
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We use the cleat on the windlass only for the short keeper line that prevents the anchor from deploying on its own. So there is almost no pressure on it at all.

We never use the windlass cleat for anything else. The two legs of our V-bridle snubber go to our heavily backed deck cleats on the foredeck as do our mooring lines. The short, heavy line we use to set the anchor against or break it out with also goes to one of the big foredeck cleats. This line enables us to set the anchor or break it out without putting any pressure at all on the pulpit, the windlass gears, or the windlass fasteners.

I agree that the cleat on the windlass should be used for light loads only.
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