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Old 01-04-2013, 04:07 PM   #41
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I already tried to reverse the palarity, but the windlass just pull. I never saw that , one DC motor that don't turn to other side.
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:09 PM   #42
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Next 17, Im going to sse the boart and will try again some solution
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Old 01-05-2013, 10:02 PM   #43
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I have used tandem anchoring three times in high gales, one of which lasted three days (no sleep). The primary rode is run through a large stainless steel caribiner at the secondary anchor so the secondary anchor acts as a large kellet keeping the primary rode horizonatal on the bottom. I had no problems with tangled rodes due to tide or current changes. In previous storm conditions I put out two separate rodes and always had a tangled mess to deal with.
I like this idea
How are the rode's retrieved? Seems to me that the second anchor is acting like a mooring buoy and takes much of the load off of the first anchor?
Does anyone use a mooring buoy?
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Old 01-06-2013, 12:54 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by boatpoker
I have used tandem anchoring three times in high gales, one of which lasted three days (no sleep). The primary rode is run through a large stainless steel caribiner at the secondary anchor so the secondary anchor acts as a large kellet keeping the primary rode horizonatal on the bottom. I had no problems with tangled rodes due to tide or current changes. In previous storm conditions I put out two separate rodes and always had a tangled mess to deal with.

I like the above method a lot and will set up something similar on Tidahapah. (I think)
Previously I have used 2 anchors on numerous occasions when sitting out a blow anchored up in the outer reefs of the Great Barrier Reef.
I have previously used my spare plough, 60 lb shackled on to the cross bar of my primary anchor with about 10 mts (30') of chain.
A bit of a pita to set and retrieve but has always held very well, but one is actually using the smaller anchor as the primary anchor.
The secret will be to get a suitable large shackle that will run down the anchor chain as I am worried that a carbiner might snag on the anchor chain.
It would appear that it might work better with rope rode (a no no for me) than all chain.
I may have to give it more thought.
Cheers
Benn
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Old 01-06-2013, 12:59 AM   #45
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Does anyone use a mooring buoy?
We have them at the little island in the San Juan's where we have property. And of course most of the Washington State Marine Parks have mooring buoys. But for them to be reliable in windy weather they need to be secured to pretty hefty anchors that won't unset if the wind shifts.

The marine parks today use big screw anchors that are "drilled" down into the bottom. At the island our mooring buoys are anchored to blocks of concrete that over the years have buried or half buried themselves in the mud. The sizes of the blocks vary with the sizes of the owners' boats. Some are a half ton, some are a ton and there may be larger ones.

Screw anchors and concrete blocks are not the most practical things to carry on a boat like ours.

And a mooring buoy doesn't take any load off its anchor. It just makes it easy to find and pick up the permanent rode attached to the anchor. The load of the boat is transmitted to the anchor through the buoy. In fact the buoys we use run the rode up through the center of the buoy to a big ring that lies on top of the buoy. So the buoy itself is simply like a bead that slides up and down on a string.
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Old 01-06-2013, 01:10 AM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tidahapah View Post
Originally Posted by boatpoker
I have used tandem anchoring three times in high gales, one of which lasted three days (no sleep). The primary rode is run through a large stainless steel caribiner at the secondary anchor so the secondary anchor acts as a large kellet keeping the primary rode horizonatal on the bottom. I had no problems with tangled rodes due to tide or current changes. In previous storm conditions I put out two separate rodes and always had a tangled mess to deal with.

I like the above method a lot and will set up something similar on Tidahapah. (I think)
Previously I have used 2 anchors on numerous occasions when sitting out a blow anchored up in the outer reefs of the Great Barrier Reef.
I have previously used my spare plough, 60 lb shackled on to the cross bar of my primary anchor with about 10 mts (30') of chain.
A bit of a pita to set and retrieve but has always held very well, but one is actually using the smaller anchor as the primary anchor.
The secret will be to get a suitable large shackle that will run down the anchor chain as I am worried that a carbiner might snag on the anchor chain.
It would appear that it might work better with rope rode (a no no for me) than all chain.
I may have to give it more thought.
Cheers
Benn
Benn, I think you would be better off just getting an anchor buddy, and keeping it simple, for the odd occasion you need the extra weight.
Worldwide distributors for Anchor Buddy anchor weights / kellets

Worldwide distributors for Anchor Buddy anchor weights / kellets
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Old 01-06-2013, 05:08 AM   #47
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I don't know Peter @ $340.00 when I already have a spare anchor on board.
Havn't done much in the last couple of years but am endeavouring to get back out a lot more this next few years and when I was doing the reef a few times a year for a couple of weeks at a time I was doing the tandem anchor caper 2 or 3 times a trip.
It is good to see they are available down here now as they weren't previously.
By the way how far away are you from the Gold Coast City Marine complex.
If this next refit comes off I may have the boat down there for a couple of months.
Cheers
Benn

PS. Peter, on second thoughts it may be a bloody good purchase, will have to check on freight costs.
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Old 01-06-2013, 04:53 PM   #48
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And a mooring buoy doesn't take any load off its anchor. It just makes it easy to find and pick up the permanent rode attached to the anchor. The load of the boat is transmitted to the anchor through the buoy. In fact the buoys we use run the rode up through the center of the buoy to a big ring that lies on top of the buoy. So the buoy itself is simply like a bead that slides up and down on a string.
Well i know you hate chapman's, but the approved method in a storm according to them is to use a float on your rode to which your vessel is attached. They claim the reason the anchor gives way is because the wave action causes the weight of the vessel to be applied directly to the anchor via the rode. To fix this they recommend using a buoy attached to the anchor with proper scope then the boat is attached to the buoy. The bouy then takes the wave load of the boat allowing the anchor to stay set.
The above is the reason for my original question. Oh, power squadron has the same recommendation s0 does boat US
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Old 01-06-2013, 06:52 PM   #49
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Now that I have a winch I just use caribiners to clip my Kellet to the chain about 10' behind the anchor.
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