Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 08-08-2016, 08:09 PM   #41
Member
 
City: Eastern KY
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 18
Fletcher - I looked at them. I like their dual frequency redundancy. I can see me hopping onto the dock, turning around and seeing my ride motor off in the distance because some kid with a R/C boat has highjacked the freq! haha
__________________
Advertisement

Notlandlockedforlong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 09:05 PM   #42
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12,928
Notlandlockedforlong,
Wow .. That's a lot of pecking and keeping all the letters right. Perhaps you could post your name .. Al? Make it up. Make it short. I post my real name but some even post their phone numbers. I would'nt do that but a "stage name" should be great. Look at other members "signatures" to get some ideas. Don't know if you can change your Notlandlockedforlong name but I know you can change your "signature".

Also since you're from the US mentioning your state will be a benefit when posting especially in winter. A very high percentage of towns and small cities most of us have never heard of. I don't think anybody cares about the town or city but the state will tell what climate you have and boating is heavily related to climate.

Thanks in advance and not picking on you but trying to get out a heads up to older members.
__________________

__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 09:13 PM   #43
Member
 
City: Eastern KY
Country: USA
Join Date: Aug 2016
Posts: 18
I'll work on it. Fletcher500 called me "Notlong". I had to laugh (some might say "not long enough") so I might go with that. Currently I reside in KY due to a lapse in judgement, hence the use of the phrase "land locked". If you've ever been to Eastern KY, you'll know why my current locale is not really an indicator of my "sailing climate". Worked for Ingram on the Ohio and I'm not planning on going back. Warm and sunny from now on :-)
Notlandlockedforlong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 09:16 PM   #44
Guru
 
Steve's Avatar
 
City: Thibodaux, Louisiana
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Gumbo
Vessel Model: 2003 Monk 36
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,420
I have done it often, as others have said it is important to get everything in order before pulling up tho "the spot". Always best to practice a few times out in the open before attempting it in a crowded anchorage.
Good luck

"La Petit Mort" interesting name for a boat!
__________________
Steve W.
http://mvgumbo.blogspot.com/
Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-08-2016, 09:36 PM   #45
Guru
 
ben2go's Avatar
 
City: Upstate,SC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: The Caroliner
Vessel Model: Plans to build 30' Spira Sitka
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notlandlockedforlong View Post
I'll work on it. Fletcher500 called me "Notlong". I had to laugh (some might say "not long enough") so I might go with that. Currently I reside in KY due to a lapse in judgement, hence the use of the phrase "land locked". If you've ever been to Eastern KY, you'll know why my current locale is not really an indicator of my "sailing climate". Worked for Ingram on the Ohio and I'm not planning on going back. Warm and sunny from now on :-)

My SO, and all her family is from Perry county,a little coal mining village up in the high mountains.Ain't no Walfart within an hour and a half drive.
__________________
BEN'S BOAT BLOG

ben2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-09-2016, 05:56 AM   #46
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,617
We choose to to use chain in rocky Maine and the Bahamas coral, but otherwise prefer nylon.

The technique is helped by our method of storing the anchor line , on deck in a loose figure 8 loop. Nothing stinks like mud on the chain , but even the wet nylon has a smell, so its kept on deck.

There is usually a breeze or a current so the boat is simply stopped , the anchor lowered and the line paid out as the boat is blown back, then secured.

You can watch and feel the boat snub to the anchor..

If there is no wind I drop the anchor after tying off the line at the amount of scope desired , then back with a poke of idle , again you will feel the boat snub, after it has pulled the line off the deck.

The AM departure is very easy as with a Hyd capstan there are no load restrictions , no burned brushes or escaping white smoke.

The boat is simply hauled to the anchor , with the momentum breaking out the anchor as we go over the top .

Should more force be required either the hyd is used to lift hard or the line is tied off , and a bit of throttle is used on the secured line , the way the chain / electric folks must do it.

When underway the line is again laid in the figure 8 , so it can dry and be ready for use.

Single handing is no big deal, with a bit of planning and line.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-18-2016, 02:09 PM   #47
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12,928
FF wrote;
"If there is no wind I drop the anchor after tying off the line at the amount of scope desired , then back with a poke of idle"

With no wind it sounds like you drop the rode on top of the anchor. Am I reading this right? Can't remember what anchor you use but it would likely open the door to the rode getting tangled in parts of the anchor. Some anchors are rather immune to this but many to most are not. I suspect you've done this a lot and I'm wondering why the anchor dosn't foul the rode.
__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2016, 11:32 AM   #48
Senior Member
 
grahamdouglass's Avatar
 
City: Vancouver Rowing Club, Coal Harbour, Vancouver, B.C.
Country: Canada
Vessel Name: Summer Wind 1
Vessel Model: Marine Trader 41
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 101
all chain rode getting tangled in the chain locker

One of the problems of anchoring alone is if you are using all chain. If your by your self and your retrieving anchor a chain pile in the anchor locker can complicate things. Or a chain ball can snag the chain when lowering the anchor on power down.

What I do is try to anchor in no more than 25 feet of water. This means I don't need more than 100 to 125' of chain. If it's really windy. After I anchor I check my locker and make sure the chain is flaked out in the anchor locker and there is plenty of room to retrieve the anchor. I use remote windless controls from the lower helm if it is windy so I am allways in control and safe inside when retrieving the anchor I'm able to idle forward when I hear the windless straining.

If it is not windy, I will use the deck switch and wash the chain as it comes on board. I will let the anchor stay in the water, mabey a foot or so underneath to give it a good wash when I leave the anchorage.

I notice there is a posting on this forum and they talk about anchor chain piling up in the locker.
grahamdouglass is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2016, 11:54 AM   #49
TF Site Team
 
FlyWright's Avatar
 
City: California Delta and SF Bay
Country: Sacramento, CA, USA (boat in Vallejo)
Vessel Name: FlyWright
Vessel Model: Marshall Californian 34 LRC
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 9,482
That's often a sign of an undersized or overloaded anchor locker. With enough drop, the chain should flow easily in and out. If your chain is tangling, it might be rusted or corroded and in need of replacement.
__________________
Al

Custom Google Trawler Forum Search
FlyWright is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2016, 06:34 AM   #50
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 15,617
"With no wind it sounds like you drop the rode on top of the anchor.'

Sort of , but it is DRY nylon so hardly sinks very fast and the walk back to the shift lever doesn't take long.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-25-2016, 09:45 AM   #51
Guru
 
Nomad Willy's Avatar
 
City: Concrete Washington State
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Willy
Vessel Model: Willard Nomad 30'
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 12,928
Quote:
Originally Posted by FF View Post
"With no wind it sounds like you drop the rode on top of the anchor.'

Sort of , but it is DRY nylon so hardly sinks very fast and the walk back to the shift lever doesn't take long.
That's what I thought for a long time.
However anchors differ widely on their ability to not snag the rode and make the anchor inoperative. Using an anchor that is immune to this would be a big asset to the solo skipper.
Most anchoring dynamics would not pile the rode in one spot, much less exactly on top of the rode.
And if a skipper waits a few moments before paying out the rode and doing it slowly that would help quite a bit.
Getting the boat moving back w the boats engine, wind or whatever would be a help.
Perhaps lowering the anchor and a nylon rode by hand from the helm window after placing the rode on the walkway beside the wheelhouse.
And if a rode could be pulled out of the locker or off the deck by the boats slowly backing down.

And w a little imagination many more methods could be devised.
__________________

__________________
Eric

North Western Washington State USA
Nomad Willy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:49 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012