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Old 07-29-2016, 04:38 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by twistedtree View Post
These pictures might help. The first is the windlass and you can see the chain lock just forward where the chain runs through it.

Next is a close up (sort of) of the chain lock. The hinged thingy has a tab on the end that locks down in between two of the chain links and takes all the chain load off the windlass. We have that short section of shock cord on it to hold the catch out of the way when raising and lowering the anchor.
Thanks Peter. I have seen those before. On here, even. Works like an old winch gear dog.

That setup still puts a good bit of downward pull on the bow hardware/pulpit, no?
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Old 07-29-2016, 04:48 PM   #22
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I took some pictures of my setup.


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This is the link e grabber wrapped around the chain. The loop there is what my shackle goes through.



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Not sure how well this will show up. The shackle is connected through both pieces of the bridle and through the loop of the line grabber.
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Old 07-29-2016, 05:16 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by dhays;
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Not sure how well this will show up. The shackle is connected through both pieces of the bridle and through the loop of the line grabber.
Then Medusa goes overboard?

Looks complicated. Might be just the pic though.
Would that be easy enough to deal with in the middle of the night in a panic?
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Old 07-29-2016, 05:56 PM   #24
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Yeah, just the picture. It isn't complicated at all
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Old 07-30-2016, 09:19 AM   #25
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You keep tension on the hook by having a big lazy loop of chain out behind it, which has the added benefit of adding weight to the "system". In hundreds of nights on the hook in all sorts of conditions, never had our chain plate-type hook fall off. Never had a rolling hitch slip either, including in some sustained multi-day 20+ winds.

Have to admit some of these schemes described above look way too complicated. And some sound like the snubber line runs through the pulpit, introducing chafe potential.
Once deployed, having the hook fall out is not an issue. All the trouble I've had has been during deployment of the snubber line + hook. If there is any slack on the snubber as you pay out the chain, the hook drops off and you have to start all over again. I think the degree to which this happens depends on the style of chain hook that you use, and perhaps I made a couple of bad choices when I bought hooks, but I have had poor success with them.
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Old 07-30-2016, 09:32 AM   #26
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Thanks Peter. I have seen those before. On here, even. Works like an old winch gear dog.

That setup still puts a good bit of downward pull on the bow hardware/pulpit, no?
Yes, good point. it definitely requires that the lock be mounted to a strong point on the boat. If you don't have such a spot, it won't be a good approach. Mine is on the main deck of the hull, not out on the pulpit. And that section of the deck is all reinforced for the purpose and is also where the main deck cleats are mounted. But the chain still goes over the pulpit roller so that takes all the force too. So use of a lock like mine should not exceed your confidence in the strength of your lock mount point and/or your pulpit.

I should have also said that I would NOT rely on the lock for storm anchoring. I would be perfectly comfortable with it up to 20-30kt winds, but if there were chance of more I would favor a snubber through both hause pipes and cleated off on deck. That brings us back to the soft shackle, and explains why I've only used it a couple of times.
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Old 07-30-2016, 10:14 AM   #27
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I can't remember if I've had the chain hook fall out when deploying or not, perhaps I got lucky when I bought the hook. I would think that if the hook falling out was an issue , dipping the hook in a flexible plastic coating would help solve that problem.
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Old 07-30-2016, 10:32 AM   #28
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Soft Shackle

I have less experience that almost all of you. Even up with my sailboat we haven't anchored all that much.

The pulpit on my boat is reasonably robust, even so I wouldn't want to put too much force on it as others have mentioned. Here are what I see as my needs.

1. Secure the anchor. The PO of my boat used a small line tied to the anchor shackle and cleated to the cleat next to the windlass. This was effective but cumbersome. Instead, I have opted to use a SS chain hook on a 6' length of nylon 3 strand. When the ancho is raised, I place the chain hook on the chain and then clear down the snubber. I then realize the tension on the windlass so the weight of the anchor is held by the snubber.

2. Set the anchor. I have been using the same chain hook and snubber line for this. When the ancho is down and just before I set it, I place the chain hook on the chain and relax the windlass. I can then set the anchor with all the load being taken by the clear next to the windlass.

3. Secure the rode overnight. This is where I use the bridle. The anchor is already set, the engine is shut down, and we are completely secure. I take the thimble end of each bridle leg and pass it up and thought the pulpit (this is the only awkward part as I have to bend down to do it). These are then shackled to the chain with the soft shackle and line grabber. This is very quick and easy. Then each end of the bridle is passed through the hawse holes and cleated. I then release the snubber and let out chain so the load is taken by the bridle. I can let out up to 25' of bridle depending on the anticipated conditions. I then re-hook the snubber on the chain as a backup to the bridle. All of this may take me 1-2 minutes since I don't move fast.

Now, if I am sure of the weather and am in a very protected anchorage, I don't bother with the bridle. Then I will simply use the snubber. The chain hook I have will easily pass over the rollers and through my pulpit. I will have about a 4' length of line on it. If I want more line on a snubber, but don't want to use the bridle, I will just use the soft shackle with a single leg of my bridle line and pass it through the bow rollers.

What would be nice is to have a chain lock. I could use it instead of the snubber for #1 and #2 above. It wouldn't really be any quicker than using the snubber, but then I could eliminate that line on the deck all the time. That is where Twisted's chain lock would be nice. I will have to check with the builder and see what he thinks about mounting one in front of the windlass.
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Old 07-30-2016, 07:50 PM   #29
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The chain lock isn't very good for securing the anchor while stowed. I find that I want the chain and anchor pulled tight so the anchor isn't wiggling or flopping around is the seas get rough. Since the chain lock that I have is in a fixed position, it will never hold the anchor tight in the pulpit. I currently do the same as you - use a chain hook on a line pulled tight and cleated off. I think this is where a cam lock or turnbuckle chain lock can do better by serving as both a storage tie down as well as a mild weather lock when the anchor is deployed. But the ones I've seen are more cumbersome to deploy so you end up trading off ease of use for multi function.
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Old 07-30-2016, 08:34 PM   #30
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The chain lock isn't very good for securing the anchor while stowed. I find that I want the chain and anchor pulled tight so the anchor isn't wiggling or flopping around is the seas get rough. Since the chain lock that I have is in a fixed position, it will never hold the anchor tight in the pulpit. I currently do the same as you - use a chain hook on a line pulled tight and cleated off. I think this is where a cam lock or turnbuckle chain lock can do better by serving as both a storage tie down as well as a mild weather lock when the anchor is deployed. But the ones I've seen are more cumbersome to deploy so you end up trading off ease of use for multi function.

Good point about the chain lock not being tight. I hadn't thought of that. I have seen the other type that you mention, but as you said, it adds some complexity making the simple chain hook and snubber maybe a better storage solution. And if I already have one in place, then I might as well keep using it to set the anchor as I have been.
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Old 07-30-2016, 11:01 PM   #31
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We just use the windlass to pull the anchor taught in the pulpit and leave it at that 99% of the time. If we see any risk of rough weather, then we use the chain hook and line to snub the assembly down a second time as a backup.
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