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Old 01-24-2015, 01:01 AM   #21
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You only talk about diameter of the line, not the length. If it is a short line it will be unable to stretch. There are lots of vessels about with 6' snubbers, these are fine for taking the load off the windlass and stopping the chain rattling on the bow roller - but as a device to absorb shacks - basically a waste of time. You need around 30' to be of value and on a trawler with plenty of beam I'd be using 2, one each side. This will not halve the load but will reduce veering and each 'side' will take near the full load half the time. Its the veering that induces the shock loads, so any reduction will reduce the severity of the shock loads.

Snubbers should be considered consumables, so having the load each side will double the life (though there are no savings as you need 2!) Join them to a common chain hook. if your snubbers do not break at around 18 months 2.5 years - they are too big! (or you need to get out more

I'd say at 3/4" you are too big, but it will be good for winds over 35 knots, or thereabouts, but will be too inelastic at 25 knots to 35 knots. The ideal is to have 2 sets of snubbers, something for everyday use and something with a bit more muscle for times when you wish you had bought the better anchor

Tests were conducted on those Taylor Made rubber snubbers - waste of money. Size for size - you would need 5 rubber snubbers to absorb the snatch that a 30' piece of nylon can absorb, and I know which is cheapest and easier to use .


edit: There is an article in the Nov 2013 issue of Practical Sailor that looks at nylon, 3 strand, multi plait and climbing rope and Taylor Made type snubbers with some calculations. close edit
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Old 01-24-2015, 01:14 AM   #22
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DJ: In total it's 40ft in length.
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Old 01-24-2015, 01:31 AM   #23
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DJ: In total it's 40ft in length.
Magic

You really do not need, want, 40' of nylon stretched out of the bow - attach to a stern cleat, or amidships cleat, run up the side deck and have just a short length (beyond a fairlead or bow roller) actually attached to the chain. You will have abrasion points, the fairlead etc, so use something to protect against chafe.

If you have lots of snubber forward of the bow it will be in the sea, collecting sand and mud (which will increase wear) and if it is such it can contact the seabed then conventional chain hooks have propensity to fall off. Keeping the 'beyond bow length' short means it will never touch the seabed (or not intentionally)

Each installation is very vessel specific so I can only generalise.

But I strongly suggest, if you have a beamy vessel - go for the bridle.
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Old 01-24-2015, 01:37 AM   #24
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Magic



You really do not need, want, 40' of nylon stretched out of the bow - attach to a stern cleat, or amidships cleat, run up the side deck and have just a short length (beyond a fairlead or bow roller) actually attached to the chain. You will have abrasion points, the fairlead etc, so use something to protect against chafe.



If you have lots of snubber forward of the bow it will be in the sea, collecting sand and mud (which will increase wear) and if it is such it can contact the seabed then conventional chain hooks have propensity to fall off. Keeping the 'beyond bow length' short means it will never touch the seabed (or not intentionally)



Each installation is very vessel specific so I can only generalise.



But I strongly suggest, if you have a beamy vessel - go for the bridle.

Thanks for the tips, like I've said I've talk to multiple people that have used this setup successfully. So I don't think I'm going to change one bit of it. The night of chain will keep the hook on the chain.
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Old 01-31-2015, 01:30 PM   #25
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Thanks for the tips, like I've said I've talk to multiple people that have used this setup successfully. So I don't think I'm going to change one bit of it. The night of chain will keep the hook on the chain.
Oliver
I tried using the standard chain hook with not much success. I switch to the Mantis chain hook, and has been very pleased your results may vary.
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Old 01-31-2015, 01:37 PM   #26
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I have used metal hooks of different types and my conclusion 1/2 inch rode with a good rolling hitch is just fine. Less to break or distort goes on easy and stays there until you remove it. No hidden stress cracks to give in the middle of the night. cheap actually free.
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Old 02-01-2015, 08:43 AM   #27
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Good ole fashioned chain hook.
Attachment 36778
That's what I also use and I have never had it come off when under use.
It's also easy for me t pluck off as it gets to the pulpit.
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Old 02-02-2015, 01:21 PM   #28
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Thanks for the tips, like I've said I've talk to multiple people that have used this setup successfully. So I don't think I'm going to change one bit of it. .
I think your plan is fine. I also use a single line and a standard chain hook.
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Old 02-02-2015, 01:30 PM   #29
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I think your plan is fine. I also use a single line and a standard chain hook.
Thanks, as long as there's a good bight of chain i don't see how i can have a problem.
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Old 02-02-2015, 01:39 PM   #30
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Because of my combo rode, I rarely need the snubber unless the waters are very shallow and the anchorage is tight with friends' boats. On the few occasions I need a snubber, I use a chain hook, too. Like Richard, I've never had it fall off. As you say, it's all about the proper rigging.

The artist who painted my boat in my avatar picture took it from an early morning picture taken at anchor by Giggitoni with the snubber in place. She accurately captured the bight as well as the deck chairs left on the foredeck from the previous night's stargazing. The only problem is that she swapped the chain for the snubber so links of chain show where there is actually snubber and vice versa.



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Old 02-02-2015, 02:13 PM   #31
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I'm converting to an all chain rode and am using this to attach my snubber to the chain.



Thinking about using a two line snubber. Might even put one of those cool rubber thingamigigies in line and see how it does.

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Old 02-02-2015, 02:17 PM   #32
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Because of my combo rode, I rarely need the snubber unless the waters are very shallow and the anchorage is tight with friends' boats. On the few occasions I need a snubber, I use a chain hook, too. Like Richard, I've never had it fall off. As you say, it's all about the proper rigging.

The artist who painted my boat in my avatar picture took it from an early morning picture taken at anchor by Giggitoni with the snubber in place. She accurately captured the bight as well as the deck chairs left on the foredeck from the previous night's stargazing. The only problem is that she swapped the chain for the snubber so links of chain show where there is actually snubber and vice versa.

Wow thats very nice!!! Might need to get one made of our boat to hang up.
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Old 02-02-2015, 02:19 PM   #33
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I'm converting to an all chain rode and am using this to attach my snubber to the chain.



Thinking about using a two line snubber. Might even put one of those cool rubber thingamigigies in line and see how it does.

I talked to a good friend that had one, said he wasn't a huge fan of it. Maybe he'll chime in as to why.
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Old 02-02-2015, 02:39 PM   #34
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I talked to a good friend that had one, said he wasn't a huge fan of it. Maybe he'll chime in as to why.
There are not allot of chain grabs that will stay attached if the chain goes slack.

Maybe I'm a worry wart because a standard chain grab would always have the weight of the chain holding the grab.
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Old 02-02-2015, 02:46 PM   #35
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For a V-bridle snubber like the one we made up, the slotted plate chain grab stays put no matter what happens until such time that we pull the rode straight during anchor retrieval. At that point the grab falls off the chain and swings down on the bridle legs to hang back under the forefoot of the boat out of the way while we continue to retreive the anchor. Once it's up and stowed we pull in the bridle.
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Old 02-02-2015, 03:48 PM   #36
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[QUOTE=ksanders;304149]

Thinking about using a two line snubber. Might even put one of those cool rubber thingamigigies in line and see how it does.

[/QUOTE


These rubber snubbers are the equivalent to adding about 6' to the existing nylon snubber rope.

I know which is cheaper and easier to install and they add nothing that nylon does not add.
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Old 02-02-2015, 03:49 PM   #37
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There are not allot of chain grabs that will stay attached if the chain goes slack.



Maybe I'm a worry wart because a standard chain grab would always have the weight of the chain holding the grab.

I do think you may be overthinking it a tad, but it's your setup and you have the freedom to do what you want. If you want something that has absolute no possibility of falling off I would look at soft shackles. No where near as bulky as there's mantus chain grabs.
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Old 02-02-2015, 04:41 PM   #38
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I've been using shockles. They are made with multiple strands of bungee cord. It looks like FlyWrights picture when used. Not sure if they make a size larger enough for a 90,000b boat. It won't come off until you want to remove it.

I think I am going to try a bridle setup this season. I'm trying to reduce sailing on anchor.
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Old 02-02-2015, 05:32 PM   #39
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I think I am going to try a bridle setup this season. I'm trying to reduce sailing on anchor.
As I've mentioned in past posts, we use a V-bridle with our all-chain rode and have been now for some 15 years or so. We will also sometimes use a single-line snubber for short stays at anchor.

To be honest, I have not noticed any significant difference in the way the boat behaves when using our V-bridle or single-line snubbers. The boat still moves around with the current, of course, and the wind pushes it around, too.

Our boat has much more windage ahead of the center of yaw than aft of it, so it's inclined to "hunt" no matter what. If we really had an issue with this hunting, or sailing if you will, we could add a steady sail to the mast and boom which, like adding bigger feathers to the back of an arrow, would help reduce the hunting in the wind.

But the boat's moving around is of no consequence to us in smooth water.

Where it can become annoying is when we are anchored or on a mooring buoy and the waves are coming from one direction when the wind is coming from another. This is a not-uncommon occurance in some of the deeper, more narrow anchorages we frequent, particulary in strong or storm winds. The waves built by the wind can bend around when they enter these narrow anchorages and so tend to come straight down the length of the anchorage even though the wind is blowing across it at an angle. When this happens, boats will point more or less into the wind which puts them at an angle to the waves, which are sometiimes pretty steep and breaking.

So the boat takes on a corkscrewing motion which can be quite uncomfortable.

When these conditions are present or anticipated, we usually put out a stern anchor to hold the boat's bow into the waves. Then all we have to contend with is a pitching movement.

A technique we have not tried in this situation when on a moooring buoy although we have the hardware on board to do it, is to put a heavy-duty snatch block on the mooring line, let the mooring line out a fair amount, and then take the line attached to the snatch block itself all the way aft and haul it in so that the block forces the mooring line into a Vee. By adjusting the depth of the Vee, the boat can be made to sit off the mooring buoy at an angle. So the Vee would be adjusted to hold the boat into the waves even though the wind was trying to hold it at an an angle.

This is easier to illustrate than describe verbally. I think we first read about it in Earl Hinz's excellent The Complete Book of Anchoring and Mooring although I may be mistaken.

But so far, at least in our experience, we have not found the V-bridle snubber to make much difference in our boat's hunting while at anchor. Perhaps if one ran the legs of the snubber back to the midships hawses and cleats it might make a noticeable reduction in the hunting. But run through the bow hawses as ours is, we don't see that it does much to reduce hunting, at least not with our boat.

We didn't start using a V-bridle for this reason; as I say, the boat's hunting around some in the wind doesn't bother us.
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Old 02-02-2015, 06:28 PM   #40
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I run my snubber line off to one side. This keeps the bow slightly off the wind and greatly reduces sailing (hunting) at anchor. "blue" line is snubber.
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