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Old 04-07-2013, 12:04 AM   #1
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Simpson Lawrence manual winch


Greetings,
Obtained a Simpson Lawrence Manual anchor winch. First introduction to the unit. Will have it installed later this month while in the yard in Wrangell. It looks simple enough. I looked at the blueprints that accompanied the winch. It appears that bicycle chain is the weak link (:Pun intended). Are these oil bathed? I see what appears to be a small filler plug. Also there is a small knife like prong that the owner said is use to back the rope out of the jaws. The blue print did not show a specific positioning for this separate item. It has four small bolt (screw?) holes four mounting(Location, Where?). Anyway, as there is no record on the thread regarding these winches specific I thought it enough to put it out there for comment, recommendations, or what to look out for.
Regards,
Al Johnson-Ketchikan
27' Marben pocket trawler
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Old 04-07-2013, 12:42 AM   #2
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Having spent nearly $1K and several hours replacing a perfectly functional manual windlass with an electrically powered one, I have to wonder why anyone would even consider a manual one.

So why?
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Old 04-07-2013, 05:56 AM   #3
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Have to agree with Ron, Al, having had to manually retrieve anchors in two yachts, and watched power boats with power winches with envy, the powered up and down winch is the best invention since sliced bread..in fact better than that. If you still have time, just save a bit more and go power winch. You would never regret doing it...you will regret not doing it. Sorry, but even with a 28 foot boat, this is a no-brainier, as they say...or they do here downunder anyway.

As to the pointy knife like thing, I think you are describing the splitter, and this is meant to be positioned so the point is where the rode needs to be separated from the gypsy, and down the rode guide or hawse tube or hole.
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Old 04-07-2013, 06:36 AM   #4
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IF you have the S/L 555 you have the finest manual windlass made.

The 40-1 ratio will allow line pulls for un-grounding the electric toy folks can only dream of.
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Old 04-07-2013, 12:11 PM   #5
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IF you have the S/L 555 you have the finest manual windlass made.

The 40-1 ratio will allow line pulls for un-grounding the electric toy folks can only dream of.
That may be true....probably is. But my Admiral would push me overboard if she had to wait for me to crank-up an anchor with a 40-1. Come to think of it, I'd probably jump before she pushed me.

I would, however, treasure the option of having both, and the ability to un-earth the anchor by manual feel.
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Old 04-07-2013, 01:49 PM   #6
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Ron- You ask "Why"?
Being Brainless I lack compassion and would throw an admiral overboard would he or she be impatient. Yes,FF. it is a 555.
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Old 04-07-2013, 11:31 PM   #7
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Ron- You ask "Why"?
Being Brainless I lack compassion and would throw an admiral overboard would he or she be impatient. .................
Huh?
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Old 04-08-2013, 06:20 AM   #8
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The SL 555 is a 2 speed unit , bu moving the lever to the 'other" gear socket its 10-1.

The 40-1 is simply for breaking out the anchor if one is too lazy to get the anchor crown ball.

And of course the 555 can simply be tailed if the engine or sails are used to move the vessel over the anchor.
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Old 04-08-2013, 07:35 AM   #9
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Having spent nearly $1K and several hours replacing a perfectly functional manual windlass with an electrically powered one, I have to wonder why anyone would even consider a manual one.

So why?

Cost ... maybe 1/2 the price. Simplicity ... no extra batts, wiring, solenoids, switches, etc. Reliability ... my SL 555 has the reputation of being bullet proof.
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Old 04-08-2013, 08:36 AM   #10
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Cost ... maybe 1/2 the price. Simplicity ... no extra batts, wiring, solenoids, switches, etc. Reliability ... my SL 555 has the reputation of being bullet proof.
Using that logic, we should all be using hand tools instead of power tools. Saws, drills, screwdrivers, etc.

Changing my manual windlass out for electric was one of the first improvements I made to my boat. Cost was about $1K and that's pretty small compared to what I paid for my boat. It does have a manual backup mode..

I spent close to twice that replacing the cabin carpet with teak and holly (synthetic).
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Old 04-08-2013, 09:18 AM   #11
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Using that logic, we should all be using hand tools instead of power tools. Saws, drills, screwdrivers, etc.
And using that logic we should hire out all work to the yard and get a crew to run the boat! Why break a sweat? To each is own.
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Old 04-08-2013, 09:58 AM   #12
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That is what I had on my last boat (37 Seabird - ketch) and I loved it! One inch per click. With power like that, never break a sweat. The "knife" goes just where the rode leaves the gypsey, to help guide it down a pipe to the locker below (if fitted).
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:04 AM   #13
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And using that logic we should hire out all work to the yard and get a crew to run the boat! Why break a sweat? To each is own.
Cranking that anchor and rode up an inch or two at a time will get pretty tedious if it's raining or cold and once you break the anchor free of the bottom, your boat is at the mercy of wind and current until you get it up and secured (unless you have someone else to drive the boat).

If you really like to break a sweat, I have some yard work you can do for me!
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:12 AM   #14
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Sounds like your'e against work Ron.
I have a friend in Alaska that said he was going to make a bumper sticker that would read "Just Say No to Work". He never made the sticker but lives his life accordingly.
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Old 04-08-2013, 11:15 AM   #15
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Sounds like your'e against work Ron.
I have a friend in Alaska that said he was going to make a bumper sticker that would read "Just Say No to Work". He never made the sticker but lives his life accordingly.
I am against unnecessary work. At work I would see guys lifting heavy objects to move them. When I needed to do that, I got a hand truck and rolled them to where they needed to be. Guys would call me lazy. I told them I was just working smart.
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Old 04-09-2013, 07:15 AM   #16
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Having spent nearly $1K and several hours replacing a perfectly functional manual windlass with an electrically powered one, I have to wonder why anyone would even consider a manual one.

Pulling Power and reliability .

A puny $1k electric job will pull the anchor rode up for you but that's about it.

Un grounding ? forgetaboutit.
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:41 AM   #17
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Yes, but you don't strain the winch breaking the anchor out, you lock it off and let the weight of the boat with a wee bit of forward motion break it out. I have to do that every time, and then as soon as it is free the winch does it's magic and up she comes. I love it.
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Old 04-09-2013, 08:55 AM   #18
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Yes, but you don't strain the winch breaking the anchor out, you lock it off and let the weight of the boat with a wee bit of forward motion break it out. I have to do that every time, and then as soon as it is free the winch does it's magic and up she comes. I love it.
I think FF is talking abut kedging off....beefy manuals are usually much more suitable for that...can be manually done with an electric one but many don't have the mechanical advantage or 2 speeds.
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Old 04-09-2013, 09:26 AM   #19
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What's this Peter's a moderator now?

That's a step up for Trawler Forum.
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Old 04-09-2013, 10:08 AM   #20
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.............. A puny $1k electric job will pull the anchor rode up for you but that's about it..
That's what I need it to do.
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