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Old 12-29-2016, 08:05 AM   #21
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Steve

It could also be said the finest set won't be worth a damn if the anchor doesn't dig in and hold. Most any anchor will work some times and some won't work most of the time. It's a crap shoot but the more positive varribles you can line up on your side the better you will be. I firmly believe in this new generation of anchors, an oversized anchor, a good set and luck.
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Old 12-29-2016, 08:50 AM   #22
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" It could also be said the finest set won't be worth a damn if the anchor doesn't dig in and hold. Most any anchor will work some times and some won't work most of the time. It's a crap shoot but the more positive varribles you can line up on your side the better you will be. I firmly believe in this new generation of anchors, an oversized anchor, a good set and luck."

I agree with much of what you state. However not the statement that "the finest set won't be worth a damn if the anchor doesn't dig in and hold." I would say the set was not the finest if the anchor doesn't dig in and hold. I promote the qualities of our anchor but there are many great anchors out there that are both from the older generation and the newer generation. There are documented reports from satisfied users on just about any anchor on the market. Those endorsements are the result of successful use.

Most anchors work better in certain bottom substrates than other seabeds. As a result, it may take a slightly different setting process to get an excellent hold in different seabeds. One has to know the strengths of his/her anchor and ground tackle as well as its challenges.

I believe that excellent execution is more important than luck. Luck comes into play when factors beyond one's control appear to not negatively impact what is within one's control. The more one can minimize the potential impact of factors out of your control by better controlling or managing those under one's control, the better. Using a quality properly sized anchor with appropriate ground tackle components, set correctly in the seabed, with appropriate scope for the weather and tidal conditions is the skill we all strive for.

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Old 12-29-2016, 09:54 AM   #23
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Anchoring a boat is a skill that takes learning. It's not just "throwing out the anchor" as I see so many do on smaller boats.

I won't try to describe how to anchor here, the information is available in books and on the Internet.

You are much more likely to wake up in the same place as when you went to sleep if you study and learn how to anchor a boat, regardless of the anchor used.
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Old 12-29-2016, 10:22 AM   #24
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"You are much more likely to wake up in the same place as when you went to sleep if you study and learn how to anchor a boat, regardless of the anchor used."

Well said.
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Old 12-29-2016, 10:37 AM   #25
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Hi Steve

I can't disagree with what your wrote except for the luck part. One night anchored in the Bahamas a Bahamian sailing vessel in a 40 knot wind got too close and picked up nylon rode and drug me about 50 yards. My yelling stopped him but by the time I could start the engines and pick up the anchor I was aground. Luckily I was able to get off buy my white rode remained black from tar until I sold the boat. Yes luck did play a role, I reanchored and spent the rest of the night but didn't sleep very well.
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Old 12-29-2016, 10:40 AM   #26
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I should add that you can do everything right and still have a bad outcome. Buy good equipment, oversize your anchor and ground tackle, check it often and develope good anchoring techniques .... then pray for good luck.
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Old 12-29-2016, 10:52 AM   #27
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I actually think we might saying the same thing about luck with your example. It appears that what happened to you was out of your control with the other boat but fortunately after all was said and done, you were lucky that nothing more was damaged or passengers injured.

I suspect your skill and abilities had a lot to do with counteracting that situation.
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Old 12-29-2016, 11:02 AM   #28
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Hi Steve

My skill and abilities would have killed me, but luck was smiling on me. LMAO. Somehow I have survived boating for 60 years with luck and the gods of boating smiling down on me. ��


Yes I believe we make our own luck most of the time but sometimes, just sometimes we need the fickle finger of luck to touch us.
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Old 12-29-2016, 12:42 PM   #29
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You guys are ignoring the biggest variable in anchoring .. the bottom.
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Old 12-29-2016, 02:16 PM   #30
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We bought a 20 kg Vulcan this fall. Very limited experience so far but has immediately stuck like glue each time dropped. Hope this continues.
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Old 12-29-2016, 02:48 PM   #31
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Hi Eric

I agree 100% but I thought that was included either proper equipment and/or using good anchoring techniques.

Sorry if I wasn't clear..
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Old 12-29-2016, 04:36 PM   #32
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I think all anchor comparisons are "subjective", not "objective. Unless you take several brands of anchors and subject them to identical conditions, your results are not scientific. Some anchor manufacturers have done side by side tests but since their anchors always win, these tests may be skewed.
We are much favored by having Steve (SV Panope`s) objective tests of set, reset and scope shortening of numerous anchors. Which identified several, maybe 3 or 4, outstanding performers.
IMO every anchoring is a self contained event, current, tide, depth, wind, bottom,selected scope, setting/testing technique, etc, so many variables. Practice helps a lot.
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Old 12-29-2016, 07:14 PM   #33
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We anchored in 20' of water with our Rocna Vulcan 20Kg ( 44 lbs ) all chain 5/16" HT rode and it set immediately and held during night winds of 10 to 15 with gust to 20 knots and a wind direction change of 180 degrees. I no longer miss my 45 lb CQR !
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Old 12-29-2016, 07:34 PM   #34
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I'm as impressed with these new generation of anchors as you are. They are so good I get lazy sometimes and don't put out as much rode as I should or set it as properly as I should, I just hope a big wind doesn't come up at night.
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Old 12-30-2016, 07:21 AM   #35
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Quote:
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You guys are ignoring the biggest variable in anchoring .. the bottom.
I don't think so. You may have missed this in an earlier message: "Most anchors work better in certain bottom substrates than other seabeds. As a result, it may take a slightly different setting process to get an excellent hold in different seabeds. One has to know the strengths of his/her anchor and ground tackle as well as its challenges."

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Old 12-30-2016, 09:17 AM   #36
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Steve,
I been caught ....
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Old 01-10-2017, 06:13 PM   #37
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I have no science to back this up but I have dropped both aluminum and ss Spade type anchors in protected fair bottomed harbors with all or mostly chain. I have taken some care that the chain does not drop on the anchor. No effort was made to back down with any force. Twenty to thirty minuets later I attempted back down and every time the anchor was already set to point where chain went taught. I believe some anchors like the Spades ronca and mansons just set themselves. When I was a younger sailor and I dropped anchor without power even old school anchors often set first time. On the other hand I have seen many Chinese fire drills where boats tried to set with powered reverse and just backed across the anchorage. I am sure that my boats 660HP or any significant % of it would make a set unlikely. I have gradually over the years developed the habit of a slow set followed later by reverse to confirm and dig a little deeper. We must also remember that often enough with a significant change in wind and current our wonderful set is turned or pulled out and that is where a good anchor resets itself without the back down usually while we sleep and what does that have to do with our great anchoring skill. I reserve most of my skill for picking where I anchor and determining if I will need a second anchor and how much and what kind of rode after that it is up to the anchor and rode to do their job especially while I sleep.
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Old 01-10-2017, 06:38 PM   #38
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No question that some anchors almost set themselves. That is what many advocate not rushing and allowing the anchor to do its thing. I know of at least one other anchor that acts the same way!
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Old 01-10-2017, 06:39 PM   #39
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"We must also remember that often enough with a significant change in wind and current our wonderful set is turned or pulled out and that is where a good anchor resets itself without the back down"

I always considered the change of tide or wind and the feet the boat moved at that time to be similar to my setting the anchor under power.

Just my SSO.
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Old 01-10-2017, 07:58 PM   #40
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No question that some anchors almost set themselves. That is what many advocate not rushing and allowing the anchor to do its thing. I know of at least one other anchor that acts the same way!
Steve
So do I, it`s the one from Australia.
Another Steve, of SV Panope has done the hard yards of set and reset and scope shortening testing for this very Forum.
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